Birds of the Bible – Woodpecker & Friend’s Storehouse

Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus) by Raymond Barlow

Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus) by Raymond Barlow

While working on the El Carpintero – The Woodpeckers article, many Bible verses about “gathering” and “storing” things were found. Following are some of those verses with photos. There is also a video of an Acorn Woodpecker gathering his supply.

We have used the verse about birds teaching us, so let’s see what can be learned this time about gathering and storing. (Job 12:7)

Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus) with Hoard or Grainary WikiC

Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus) with Hoard or Grainary WikiC

He who gathers in summer is a wise son; He who sleeps in harvest is a son who causes shame. (Proverbs 10:5 NKJV)

PIC-Pici Acorn Woodpecker Granary Tree holes ©Flickr Ornitholoco

Provides her supplies in the summer, And gathers her food in the harvest. (Proverbs 6:8 NKJV) (the ant)

Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus) by Reinier Munguia

Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus) by Reinier Munguia

Wealth gained hastily will dwindle, but whoever gathers little by little will increase it. (Proverbs 13:11 ESV)

Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus) by Ian

Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus) by Ian

Wise people store up knowledge, But the mouth of the foolish is near destruction. The rich man’s wealth is his strong city; The destruction of the poor is their poverty. The labor of the righteous leads to life, The wages of the wicked to sin. (Proverbs 10:14-16 NKJV)

Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) by Ray - They will store food for later use.

Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) by Ray – They will store food for later use.

He stores up sound wisdom for the upright; He is a shield to those who walk uprightly; (Proverbs 2:7 NKJV)

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) Collecting for Cache

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) Collecting for Cache

For they do not know to do right,’ Says the LORD, ‘Who store up violence and robbery in their palaces.’ ” (Amos 3:10 NKJV)

Western Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma californica) Holding an Acorn ©WikiC

Western Scrub Jay (Aphelocoma californica) Holding an Acorn ©WikiC

storing up for themselves a good foundation for the time to come, that they may lay hold on eternal life. (1 Timothy 6:19 NKJV)

Grey-headed Chickadee (Poecile cinctus) ©WikiC

Grey-headed Chickadee or Siberian Tit (Poecile cinctus, formerly Parus cinctus) May store upto 500,000 items per year ©WikiC

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Bird Tales – The Woodpeckers Bird Band

Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus) by Daves BirdingPix

Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus) by Daves BirdingPix

 

The Woodpeckers Bird Band

The Woodpecker family were around on various trees drumming, drumming on the bark. Mr. Hairy Woodpecker, Mr. Downy Woodpecker, and Mr. Red-Headed Woodpecker were hard at work.

Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) by Raymond Barlow

Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) by Raymond Barlow

“Let’s start a band,” suggested Mr. Hairy Woodpecker.

Red-headed Woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) ©USFWS

Red-headed Woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) ©USFWS

“What’s that you say?” asked Mr. Red-Headed Woodpecker, who had been so busy at work that he had not heard what Mr. Hairy Woodpecker had been suggesting. “A band,” repeated Mr. Hairy Woodpecker. “What sort of a band?” asked Mr. Red-Headed Woodpecker. “In the first place,” continued Mr. Hairy Woodpecker, “our bills are not only fine tools for the work we have to do getting the insects from the trees, and burrowing for our nests, but they would be splendid to use in beating the drums in a band.” “Where would we get the drums?” asked Mr. Red-Headed Woodpecker. “The trees, of course, you silly!” said Mr. Hairy Woodpecker. “Oh yes, yes,” agreed Mr. Red-Headed Woodpecker. And Mr. Downy Woodpecker said, “Of course, of course. The trees will be our drums.”

American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis) on Thistle by Fenton

American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis) on Thistle by Fenton

“We’ll get the other birds,” said Mr. Hairy Woodpecker, “to help us. We need something in a band besides the drums. We will ask the goldfinches, the mocking-birds, the bobolinks, the phœbe and chickadee families, all of the warbler and vireo families, and the robins of course. Then I think we’ll ask the orioles, the whippoorwills, the thrush family, and the song sparrows.”

Carolina Chickadee (Poecile carolinensis) by Daves BirdingPix

Carolina Chickadee (Poecile carolinensis) by Daves BirdingPix

“Oh,” said Mr. Downy Woodpecker, “that will make a perfect band. We’d better get started right away.” And the woodpeckers began to practise. They made such a noise that the birds came from far and near to see what they were doing. Mr. Sapsucker, Mr. Crested Woodpecker, and Mr. Flicker Woodpecker had all joined in beating the drums too!

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius) by Raymond Barlow

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius) by Raymond Barlow

“Why are you making so much noise?” asked the birds as they flew around to the nearby trees to talk to the woodpeckers. “Oh,” said Mr. Hairy Woodpecker, “we were just going to ask you all to join our band. We will beat the drums.”

American Robin (Turdus migratorius) by Daves BirdingPix

American Robin (Turdus migratorius) by Daves BirdingPix

“And just what do you want us to do?” asked Mr. Robin Redbreast, who was always eager to help. “You must all sing.”

Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) by J Fenton

Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) by J Fenton

“But we all sing differently,” chirped a song sparrow. “We know different tunes and different songs.” “Oh,” said Mr. Hairy Woodpecker, “I never thought about that. But never mind, you can have little parts to sing alone, and other choruses where you will all sing together. I’m sure it will be a very fine band after we have practised.” And they began pounding the drums again. “Well,” said Mr. Robin Redbreast, “if the bird band isn’t to be the finest in the land, at least we’ll make a cheerful noise!”

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) by J Fenton

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) by J Fenton

* Another Bird Tale From

Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories – Gutenberg ebooks

By

Mary Graham Bonner

With four illustrations in color by Florence Choate and Elizabeth Curtis

Daddys Bedtime Story Images

These stories first appeared in the American Press Association Service and the Western Newspaper Union.


Many of the sketches in this volume are the work of Rebecca McCann, creator of the “Cheerful Cherub,” etc.

Daddy's Bedtime Bird Stories by Mary Graham Bonner - 1917

Daddy’s Bedtime Bird Stories by Mary Graham Bonner – 1917


Lee’s Addition:

Psalms 98:4-8 KJV (4) Make a joyful noise unto the LORD, all the earth: make a loud noise, and rejoice, and sing praise. (5) Sing unto the LORD with the harp; with the harp, and the voice of a psalm. (6) With trumpets and sound of cornet make a joyful noise before the LORD, the King. (7) Let the sea roar, and the fulness thereof; the world, and they that dwell therein. (8) Let the floods clap their hands: let the hills be joyful together

Meet the whole band: (a few missed the photo session)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

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Inside A Birdhouse

Thought you might enjoy seeing “Inside A Birdhouse”

A friend sent me a link to this commercial. Couldn’t resist.

Keep an eye out for the Human Clock.

A happy heart is good medicine and a cheerful mind works healing, but a broken spirit dries up the bones. (Proverbs 17:22 AMP)

(A fruit drink called Squash)

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Birds of the Bible – Bird-Nesting (Hastings)

American Robin (Turdus migratorius) with young in nest

American Robin (Turdus migratorius) with young in nest

If a bird’s nest should chance to be before you in the way, in any tree or on the ground, with young ones or eggs, and the mother bird is sitting on the young or on the eggs, you shall not take the mother bird with the young. You shall surely let the mother bird go, and take only the young, that it may be well with you and that you may prolong your days. (Deuteronomy 22:6-7 AMP)

Bird-Nesting

(Just found this interesting Commentary for Children – Children’s Great Texts of the Bible by James Hastings for my e-Sword.)

If a bird’s nest chance to be before thee in the way, in any tree or on the ground, with young ones or eggs, and the dam sitting upon the young, or upon the eggs, thou shalt not take the dam with the young: thou shalt in any wise let the dam go, but the young thou mayest take to thyself; that it may be well with thee, and that thou mayest prolong thy days.—Deu_22:6-7.

You think of the children of Israel, don’t you, as having lived far back in the dark ages? But here is one of the commandments which God gave to them—a little one about a bird’s nest—and the words of it make us feel that those wanderers were just big boys and girls with the same inclinations as we ourselves have today.

We learn from the words that the birds that flew about the Israelites as they journeyed were, in many cases, birds such as those we have now. The people must have been robbing their nests too, else we should not have had this verse at all. Naturally enough, in their wanderings they often came upon a nest by the wayside.

Northern Lapwing (Vanellus vanellus) by Nikhil Devasar

Northern Lapwing (Vanellus vanellus) by Nikhil Devasar

It may be that the Israelitish boys knew the little bird nests which are found in a hollow by the side of a marsh. Perhaps they thoughtlessly scattered the eggs, or perhaps Mr. Lapwing—artful little bird that he is!—lured them away from it with the wonderful antics with which he and his ancestors, generation after generation, have protected their nests. For Mr. Lapwing is the real defender of his nest. The mother bird is generally so frightened that she flies away. But when an enemy approaches the male lapwing practices the tricks his father taught him. Gradually moving farther and farther away from where the precious eggs are, he turns a number of somersaults, or he does other equally extraordinary things. The onlooker becomes so interested that the nest is forgotten.

Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) by Reinier Munguia

Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) by Reinier Munguia

You remember Noah’s clever scout bird, the dove? She, too, would be known to the Israelites. The dove has a very mournful note. No wonder! Her family has ancient legends of how large numbers of them used to be trapped and taken captive to Jerusalem and then killed. Sacrifice had no meaning to them. It was all a mystery, and they just mourned.

What made me think of the text this morning? Why, just the fact that it is May! And May is the great month for birds’ nests. It is the birds’ busy time.
In trees, in bushes, on house-tops, or on the ground, they have built their little homes. What wonderful architects many of them are. One bird has woven twigs together into a building like an old Gothic church; another has built his house in the shape of a bottle; while one we all love lives in a dear little house made of mud. They were very patient while they gathered their building materials; and when they selected a site for their nest, by some strange instinct they chose it as far out of the reach of boys and girls as possible. But in spite of all their wonderful wisdom, somehow—and I feel ashamed to say it—there are always boys ready to climb up and destroy the little houses on which so much thoughtful care has been bestowed.

Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) at Nest  by Anthony747

Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) at Nest by Anthony747

Now I am to give you three reasons why I want you not to disturb a bird’s nest while it’s being used.

1. Because it is cruel and cowardly.—What would you think if anyone were to break open the door of your home and run away with your bed? Think of your mother going out one day and coming home to find that someone had been there and stolen you away! Yet, how often does the poor mother bird come home to find all her children taken from her? If you rob a nest, it is a case of the strong taking advantage of the weak —a cowardly action under any circumstances—you know it is.

2. Because the birds have rights.—Any creature that suffers has rights. Theodore Parker, the great American preacher, when a lad, saw a turtle on a log, and, with stone in hand, he crept up and was about to throw it, when he heard a voice within which made him desist. He asked his mother about it. She told him that it was the protest of the doctrine of rights— the voice of God. Killing an animal for food or clothing is a part of life. But killing an animal for “fun” or “sport” is wrong.

3. Because we ought to love the birds, and love never willfully hurts what it loves. Love was Christ’s great commandment—love in little as well as in big things. God is great, yet He cares for the birds. “Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father.”
What has the song of birds’ not done for many a man and woman? It has cheered them, it has inspired them, it has given them new courage. It has even led them to God.

Savannah Sparrow Fifty Point-Canada by Ray Barlow

Savannah Sparrow Fifty Point-Canada by Ray Barlow

Here are some beautiful verses, by the poet George Macdonald, which tell what the song of a bird did for the heart of a man.

A brown bird sang on a blossomy tree,
Sang in the moonshine, merrily,
Three little songs, one, two, and three,
A song for his wife, for himself, and me.

He sang for his wife, sang low, sang high,
Filling the moonlight that filled the sky;
“Thee, thee, I love thee, heart alive!
Thee, thee, thee, and thy round eggs five!”

He sang to himself, “What shall I do
With this life that thrills me through and through!
Glad is so glad that it turns to ache!
Out with it, song, or my heart will break!”

He sang to me, “Man, do not fear
Though the moon goes down and the dark is near
Listen my song and rest thine eyes;
Let the moon go down that the sun may rise!”

I folded me up in the heart of his tune,
And fell asleep with the sinking moon;
I woke with the day’s first golden gleam,
And, lo, I had dreamed a precious dream!

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By James Hastings’ Children’s Great Texts of the Bible

(I normally do a Birds of the Bible here and adapt it for the Birds of the Bible For Kids website. This time I am sharing one I posted on their site first.)

Birds of the Bible – Here

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