Patience Trying To Photograph Yellow-billed Hornbill

Trying to get through the fence/cage
Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill (Tockus leucomelas) Cincinnati Zoo 2016

If you followed the posts while we were on our trip, you are aware that we skipped going to the Cincinnati Zoo because of weather.

Home Again After 2,000 Mile Trip

And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience; And patience, experience; and experience, hope: (Romans 5:3-4 KJV)

Since we have been there twice already, I decided to see if there were some birds that were not written about from those trips. Actually, there are quite a few.

This Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill’s photo caught my attention. It is so hard to get a photo through the cages of the zoos. This Avian Wonder was just as hard to capture. After several tries, the Hornbill came into focus and I still remember my excitement. Patience is hard at times, but it does pay off.

Yeah! I got through!
Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill (Tockus leucomelas) Cincinnati Zoo 2016

“But if we hope for that we see not, then do we with patience wait for it.” (Romans 8:25 KJV)

https://youtu.be/SnIfbwWep6g
I captured him calling.

Here are some more articles written about our visits to the Cincinnati Zoo:

God’s Weaver Birds At Work

Lesser Masked Weaver (Ploceus intermedius) by Bob-Nan

“My days are swifter than a weaver’s shuttle,…” (Job 7:6a KJV)

“Them hath he filled with wisdom of heart, to work all manner of work, of the engraver, and of the cunning workman, and of the embroiderer, in blue, and in purple, in scarlet, and in fine linen, and of the weaver, even of them that do any work, and of those that devise cunning work.” (Exodus 35:35 KJV) [This has to do with the Tabernacle bulders, but the wisdom of heart applies here also.]

A friend shared a video with me of the Weaver Birds on Facebook while we were traveling. I thought I would share some of the fantastic weaving ability given these birds by their Creator.

These are just a few of the videos of Weavers at Work

Here’s another video on YouTube taken at the San Diego Zoo

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Previous Articles about the Weaver Birds:

Sunday Inspiration – Weavers and Allies
Wonga Dove and Taveta Weavers at Houston Zoo
Nuggets Plus – The Weaver, The Caller (Ready)
Interesting Things – The Weaver Bird
Baya Weaver – The Model Church

Who Paints The Leaves?

Many Geese and Ducks in Indiana

Mallards

“A man that hath friends must shew himself friendly: and there is a friend that sticketh closer than a brother.” (Proverbs 18:24 KJV)”

So far we haven’t seen many birds. My sister-in-law has a pond behind here with Mallards. Also, a Blue Jay has been calling, but has refused to show himself.

The ponds around town, Indianapolis, has lots of Canadian Geese hanging out. The one batch/flock had about 20 or so, and they were all faced south. Maybe they were getting aligned so they could get started South for the winter. Yet, up here it is still summer weather. Maybe they aren’t sure when to leave. Also, the remnants of Tropical Storm Gordon is going to come through tomorrow. The rain chance is 100% and flood warnings are being issued starting tomorrow. Welcome to Indiana.

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) by Ian

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) by Ian

Dan’s 60th High School reunion starts today and will be having gatherings for the next two days. We plan to leave here Sunday afternoon to go to Cincinnati area. Plans, depending on all this rain, we hope to go to the Cincinnati Zoo and then the Creation Museum. Then mosey home.

“But I trust I shall shortly see thee, and we shall speak face to face. Peace be to thee. Our friends salute thee. Greet the friends by name.” (3 John 1:14 KJV)

So far, praise the Lord, I have been handling this trip. My recent back surgery is still causing pain, but doing okay so far.

Unfortunately, my relative has NO INTERNET!!! :(   So here I sit at McDonalds. Yeah, for free internets! That is why the posts are intermitten. Trust to post photos from the Zoo later. Hope they won’t have raindrops dripping off of them. :)

Stay tuned!

Migration Is Starting And The Birds Are Heading Out

Common Cranes in Israel. Many species of crane gather in large groups during migration and on their wintering grounds

Common Cranes in Israel. Many species of crane gather in large groups during migration and on their wintering grounds

“Even the stork in the sky Knows her seasons; And the turtledove and the swift and the thrush Observe the time of their migration; But My people do not know The ordinance of the LORD.” (Jeremiah 8:7 NASB)

This time of the year, the birds start gathering together to migrate, or move, to their winter place. The birds in Australia, begin flying north to their summer place. But they like to fly in groups. This helps keep them secure and going in the right direction. The cartoon below is cute, but God has built into birds a very accurate way to migrate. A few birds become confused in storms and become “lost.” Even then, many of them still arrive at their destinations.

Migration – Family Circus

The V-formation helps the birds use less energy. This enables the birds to travel the long distances much easier. There are several articles written that you might want to read:

You Comfort Me

Skimmer Baby Leaning against Parents Beak – ©Thomas C – NatlGeog – Pinterest

“If I say, “My foot slips,” Your mercy, O LORD, will hold me up. In the multitude of my anxieties within me, Your comforts delight my soul.” (Psalms 94:18-19 NKJV)

A Black Skimmer chick holding on to it’s parent. Adorable!

What verse(s) would you use for this photo?

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Gideon

Woodstock’s Shock Lessons

Woodstock and Flying

For those of you who do not know about Peanuts, the cartoon character, they feature a dog named Snoopy. Snoopy’s friend is a little yellow bird named Woodstock. Snoopy is the only one who understands what Woodstock says.

While I have been recovering from my surgery, my birdwatching has been only reading about the adventures of Woodstock and Snoopy instead of out birdwatching for real. I have kept a few the adventures of them to share with you all.

The top photo was a shock to Woodstock, and you can see this in – Flying is at least safer for Woodstock

Here are a few more adventures of Woodstock:

Woodstock Shock of No Worms

“O satisfy us early with thy mercy; that we may rejoice and be glad all our days.” (Psalms 90:14 KJV)

“I love them that love me; and those that seek me early shall find me.” (Proverbs 8:17 KJV)

Woodstock was seeking a worm to eat, but the Lord wants us to seek Him early in the morning, and all day long.

Woodstock’s Wake Up Shock

“A friend loves at all times, …” (Proverbs 17:17a NKJV)

Sometimes were are tempted to do things, but really shouldn’t do it. We really do not want to hurt one another.

Woodstock Needs Recycled

“But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin. If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we say that we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.” (1 John 1:7-10 KJV)

The Lord knows that we fail sometimes, but He gives us many 2nd chances.

Wordless Birds

 

Emma’s Stories Retold – Lizzy and the Penguin Catapult

Emperor Penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) ©WikiC

Emperor Penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) ©WikiC

Emma’s Stories Retold – Lizzy and the Penguin Catapult

~ by Emma Foster

Once there was a penguin named Lizzy who lived with many other penguins in cold Antarctica.

As the penguins traveled through the winter, Lizzy watched with great interest all the eggs that lay on the penguin dad’s feet. Lizzy was too young to go fishing with all the mother penguins that year, so she was traveling with the father penguins to someplace slightly warmer.

Emperor with egg on feet ©WikiC

Emperor with egg on feet ©WikiC

Eventually all of the penguins came to an enormous, icy lake that was too large to go around. The penguin parents huddled together and decided to build a catapult out of some wood they brought with them to build their homes. The catapult would shoot penguins one at a time over the lake. The penguins decided this because the dad penguins could not cross the lake with eggs; and, if they all traveled across it at once, the ice might break. The penguins decided the eggs would be safe because there was a lot of snow on the other side of the lake which would cushion their landing.

Gentoo Penguin - Paradise Bay

Gentoo Penguin – Paradise Bay

Lizzy helped build the catapult and it wasn’t long before it was finally completed.

The first penguin had to be launched by the catapult, but no penguin was willing to do it. Lizzy was a brave penguin and decided to go first.

The catapult was launched, and Lizzy flew through the air. She was actually flying!

Adelie Penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) by Bob-Nan

Adelie Penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) by Bob-Nan

Lizzy landed softly and safely in the snow on the other side of the lake and waved to the other penguins. One by one, the rest of the penguins catapulted over the lake with the eggs. When they were all safely on the other side, they traveled to their new home.

The End


Lee’s Addition:

“Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God; (Philippians 4:6 NKJV)

Thanks, Emma, for another delightful story. Lizzy is one brave little Penguin and also willing to help out.

I am sure the penguins, even though not humans, were thankful to their Creator for taking care of them.

“But now ask the beasts, and they will teach you; And the birds of the air, and they will tell you; Or speak to the earth, and it will teach you; And the fish of the sea will explain to you. Who among all these does not know That the hand of the LORD has done this, In whose hand is the life of every living thing, And the breath of all mankind? (Job 12:7-10 NKJV)

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See more of Emma’s Bird Tales

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ABC’s of the Gospel

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Some Homes in the Green Forest – Chapter 18

Redtail the Hawk - Burgess Bird Book ©©

Redtail the Hawk – Burgess Bird Book ©©

Some Homes in the Green Forest

The Crow, the Oven Bird and the Red-tailed Hawk.

The Burgess Bird Book For Children

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CHAPTER 18. Some Homes in the Green Forest.

Listen to the story read.

Reddy Fox wasted very little time waiting for Peter Rabbit to come out from under that pile of brush where he had hidden at Sammy Jay’s warning. After making some terrible threats just to try to frighten Peter, he trotted away to look for some Mice. Peter didn’t mind those threats at all. He was used to them. He knew that he was safe where he was, and all he had to do was to stay there until Reddy should be so far away that it would be safe to come out.

Just to pass away the time Peter took a little nap. When he awoke he sat for a few minutes trying to make up his mind where to go and what to do next. From ‘way over in the direction of the Old Pasture the voice of Blacky the Crow reached him. Peter pricked up his ears, then chuckled.

“Reddy Fox has gone back to the Old Pasture and Blacky has discovered him there,” he thought happily. You see, he understood what Blacky was saying. To you or me Blacky would have been saying simply, “Caw! Caw!” But to all the little people of the Green Forest and Green Meadows within hearing he was shouting, “Fox! Fox!”

“I wonder,” thought Peter, “where Blacky is nesting this year. Last year his nest was in a tall pine-tree not far from the edge of the Green Forest. I believe I’ll run over there and see if he has a new nest near the old one.”

So Peter scampered over to the tall pine in which was Blacky’s old nest. As he sat with his head tipped back, staring up at it, it struck him that that nest didn’t look so old, after all. In fact, it looked as if it had recently been fixed up quite like new. He was wondering about this and trying to guess what it meant, when Blacky himself alighted close to the edge of it.

There was something in his bill, though what it was Peter couldn’t see. Almost at once a black head appeared above the edge of the nest and a black bill seized the thing which Blacky had brought. Then the head disappeared and Blacky silently flew away.

“As sure as I live,” thought Peter, “that was Mrs. Blacky, and Blacky brought her some food so that she would not have to leave those eggs she must have up there. He may be the black-hearted robber every one says he is, but he certainly is a good husband. He’s a better husband than some others I know, of whom nothing but good is said. It just goes to show that there is some good in the very worst folks. Blacky is a sly old rascal. Usually he is as noisy as any one I know, but he came and went without making a sound. Now I think of it, I haven’t once heard his voice near here this spring. I guess if Farmer Brown’s boy could find this nest he would get even with Blacky for pulling up his corn. I know a lot of clever people, but no one quite so clever as Blacky the Crow. With all his badness I can’t help liking him.”

Twice, while Peter watched, Blacky returned with food for Mrs. Blacky. Then, tired of keeping still so long, Peter decided to run over to a certain place farther in the Green Forest which was seldom visited by any one. It was a place Peter usually kept away from. It was pure curiosity which led him to go there now. The discovery that Blacky the Crow was using his old nest had reminded Peter that Redtail the Hawk uses his old nest year after year, and he wanted to find out if Redtail had come back to it this year.

Halfway over to that lonesome place in the Green Forest a trim little bird flew up from the ground, hopped from branch to branch of a tree, walked along a limb, then from pure happiness threw back his head and cried, “Teacher, teacher, teacher, teacher, teacher!” each time a little louder than before. It was Teacher the Oven Bird.

Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) by Raymond Barlow

Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) by Raymond Barlow

In his delight at seeing this old friend, Peter quite forgot Redtail the Hawk. “Oh, Teacher!” cried Peter. “I’m so glad to see you again!”

Teacher stopped singing and looked down at Peter. “If you are so glad why haven’t you been over to see me before?” he demanded. “I’ve been here for some time.”

Peter looked a little foolish. “The truth is, Teacher,” said he very humbly, “I have been visiting the Old Orchard so much and learning so many things that this is the first chance I have had to come ‘way over here in the Green Forest. You see, I have been learning a lot of things about you feathered folks, things I hadn’t even guessed. There is something I wish you’d tell me, Teacher; will you?”

“That depends on what it is,” replied Teacher, eyeing Peter a little suspiciously.

“It is why you are called Oven Bird,” said Peter.

“Is that all?” asked Teacher. Then without waiting for a reply he added, “It is because of the way Mrs. Teacher and I build our nest. Some people think it is like an oven and so they call us Oven Birds. I think that is a silly name myself, quite as silly as Golden Crowned Thrush, which is what some people call me. I’m not a Thrush. I’m not even related to the Thrush family. I’m a Warbler, a Wood Warbler.”

“I suppose,” said Peter, looking at Teacher thoughtfully, “they’ve given you that name because you are dressed something like the Thrushes. That olive-green coat, and white waistcoat all streaked and spotted with black, certainly does remind me of the Thrush family. If you were not so much smaller than any of the Thrushes I should almost think you were one myself. Why, you are not very much bigger than Chippy the Chipping Sparrow, only you’ve got longer legs. I suppose that’s because you spend so much time on the ground. I think that just Teacher is the best name for you. No one who has once heard you could ever mistake you for any one else. By the way, Teacher, where did you say your nest is?”

“I didn’t say,” retorted Teacher. “What’s more, I’m not going to say.”

“Won’t you at least tell me if it is in a tree?” begged Peter.

Teacher’s eyes twinkled. “I guess it won’t do any harm to tell you that much,” said he. “No, it isn’t in a tree. It is on the ground and, if I do say it, it is as well hidden a nest as anybody can build. Oh, Peter, watch your step! Watch your step!” Teacher fairly shrieked this warning.

Peter, who had just started to hop off to his right, stopped short in sheer astonishment. Just in front of him was a tiny mound of dead leaves, and a few feet beyond Mrs. Teacher was fluttering about on the ground as if badly hurt. Peter simply didn’t know what to make of it. Once more he made a movement as if to hop. Teacher flew right down in front of him. “You’ll step on my nest!” he cried.

Peter stared, for he didn’t see any nest. He said as much.

“It’s under that little mound of leaves right in front of your feet!” cried Teacher. “I wasn’t going to tell you, but I just had to or you certainly would have stepped on it.”

Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) Nest ©WikiC

Very carefully Peter walked around the little bunch of leaves and peered under them from the other side. There, sure enough, was a nest beneath them, and in it four speckled eggs. “I won’t tell a soul, Teacher. I promise you I won’t tell a soul,” declared Peter very earnestly. “I understand now why you are called Oven Bird, but I still like the name Teacher best.”

Feeling that Mr. and Mrs. Teacher would feel easier in their minds if he left them, Peter said good-by and started on for the lonesome place in the Green Forest where he knew the old nest of Redtail the Hawk had been. As he drew near the place he kept sharp watch through the treetops for a glimpse of Redtail. Presently he saw him high in the blue sky, sailing lazily in big circles. Then Peter became very, very cautious. He tiptoed forward, keeping under cover as much as possible. At last, peeping out from beneath a little hemlock-tree, he could see Redtail’s old nest. He saw right away that it was bigger than it had been when he saw it last. Suddenly there was a chorus of hungry cries and Peter saw Mrs. Redtail approaching with a Mouse in her claws. From where he sat he could see four funny heads stretched above the edge of the nest.

“Redtail is using his old nest again and has got a family already,” exclaimed Peter. “I guess this is no place for me. The sooner I get away from here the better.”

Red-tailed Hawk- Cochran Shoals Unit Chattahoochee River by SSlayton

Red-tailed Hawk- Cochran Shoals Unit Chattahoochee River by SSlayton

Just then Redtail himself dropped down out of the blue, blue sky and alighted on a tree close at hand. Peter decided that the best thing he could do was to sit perfectly still where he was. He had a splendid view of Redtail, and he couldn’t help but admire this big member of the Hawk family. The upper parts of his coat were a dark grayish-brown mixed with touches of chestnut color. The upper part of his breast was streaked with grayish-brown and buff, the lower part having but few streaks. Below this were black spots and bars ending in white. But it was the tail which Peter noticed most of all. It was a rich reddish-brown with a narrow black band near its end and a white tip. Peter understood at once why this big Hawk is called Redtail.

It was not until Mr. and Mrs. Redtail had gone in quest of more food for their hungry youngsters that Peter dared steal away. As soon as he felt it safe to do so, he headed for home as fast as he could go, lipperty-lipperty-lip. He knew that he wouldn’t feel safe until that lonesome place in the Green Forest was far behind.

Yet if the truth be known, Peter had less cause to worry than would have been the case had it been some other member of the Hawk family instead of Redtail. And while Redtail and his wife do sometimes catch some of their feathered and furred neighbors, and once in a while a chicken, they do vastly more good than harm.

This story gives good examples of friends watching out for friends. Also, friends love their neighbors and go for visits now and then.

“But you be watchful in all things,…” (2 Timothy 4:5a NKJV)

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  • Who was the one warning the animal and bird friends?
  • What is a call of the Crow?
  • Is it good for us to warn others of danger?
  • What does Peter really think it says?
  • Who was the little bird that Peter spotted up in the tree?
  • Why is he called by that name?
  • When Peter began to leave, why did the little bird become upset?
  • What bird was Peter looking for, yet had to make sure that bird didn’t see him?
  • Why didn’t Peter want to be seen?
  • Who sees us all the time? Can we hide from Him?

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“A friend loveth at all times,…” (Proverbs 17:17a KJV)

Links:

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Links:

 

  Next Chapter (A Maker of Thunder and a Friend in Black. Coming Soon)

 

 

Burgess-Bird-Book-for-Children

 

 

  Burgess-Bird-Book-for-Children

 

Gold/Yellow = Heaven

  

 

  Wordless Birds

 

 

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Viera Wetlands – Candy Corn Moorhen

Common Moorhen by Dan at Viera Wetlands

The Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) has a bill that reminds me so much of Candy Corn. On our latest trip to Viera Wetlands, Dan was able to capture this adult with his camera. We showed you the young one with big feet in Big Feet on July 5th.

Young Moorhen at Viera Wetlands

Here are some more photos taken previously:

Common Moorhen Parent and baby Moorhen at Lake Hollingsworth

Another Baby Moorhen at Lake Hollingsworth by Lee

Baby Moorhen – Big feet and undeveloped beak color. Lake Hollingsworth – by Lee

Baby Moorhen with Big Feet above and Adult Common Moorhen below with big feet

Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) PB Zoo by Lee

Then God said, “Let the waters abound with an abundance of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the face of the firmament of the heavens.” (Genesis 1:20 NKJV)

Back to the Candy Corn beak:

Baby Moorhen No Feathers on Wing at Lake Hollingsworth Cropped by Lee

Fact from All About Birds:

  • Newly hatched Common Gallinule chicks have spurs on their wings that help them climb into the nest or grab onto vegetation.

Common Gallinule (Gallinula galeata) Lowry Park Zoo

Common Gallinule (Gallinula galeata) Amazon and Beyond-wild – Zoo Miami – by Lee

Moorhens [Gallinule – They keep changing the names]- All About Birds

Big Feet

Wordless Waterbirds

Wordless Waterbirds

Common Moorhen by Dan

Wordless Waterbirds

Gold/Yellow = Heaven

The GOLD/Yellow tip of the beak reminds us of Heaven. The Bible tells us Heaven has a street of gold! But the best part about Heaven is that God, who created you and me, lives there. The Bible, God’s Word, says: “God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.” — John 3:16 Jesus, God the Son, is in Heaven preparing a place for all who put their trust in Him. (John 14:2-3) God is holy and perfect. He cannot allow anything in Heaven that is less than perfect, so there’s one thing that can never be in Heaven. Can you think of what that might be?

Black/Dark = Sin

It is sin! That is what this DARK back and head of the bird reminds us of. Sin is anything you think, say, or do that does not please God, like lying, cheating, being selfish, or hurting others. The Bible says: “All have sinned and come short of the glory of God.” — Romans 3:23 That means everyone, big or little, young or old! No matter where you live or who you are, you have sinned. Everyone is born with a “want to” to do wrong. God says that sin must be punished (Romans 6:23), and the punishment for sin is to be separated from God forever in a place of suffering….a place called Hell. But God has a wonderful plan so that you will not have to be punished for your sin!

Red = Jesus Blood

God sent Jesus Christ, His perfect Son, to be born as a little baby. Jesus lived a perfect life….He never sinned. When He was grown, wicked men nailed Him to a cross. This Moorhens beak is RED reminding us of Jesus’ blood. The Bible says that without the giving of blood there can be no forgiveness of sin (Hebrews 9:22). So Jesus Christ willingly died to take your sin punishment. “…Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures; and that He was buried, and that He rose again the third day, according to the Scriptures.“— 1 Corinthians 15:3-4 Now, because of what Jesus has done for you, you can have your sins forgiven. Read on to see how!

White = Clean Heart

The Bible says: “As many as received Him, to them gave He power to become the sons of God, even to them that believed on His name.” — John 1:12 The WHITE beak of the Hawaiian Coot reminds us of a CLEAN heart. How can you have a clean heart? A = Admit to God you are a sinner and want to turn away from those sins. B = Believe in Jesus Christ, that He is God’s perfect Son who died for your sin, was buried, and rose again. C = Call on Him to save you from your sin. Would you like to do that right now? He has promised to hear, and once you are His child, He will never leave you (Hebrews 13:5). Take a moment and talk to God right now. It will change your life forever. Only one more color! What can it mean?

Green = Growth

The GREEN around this Purple Gallinule stands for things that grow. When you ask God to forgive you and save you, you become His child. God wants you to get to know Him better and to grow to become more like Him. These four things will help you grow:

1. PRAY (talk to God every day)
2. READ & OBEY THE BIBLE (to know what He says, then do it)
3. TELL OTHERS ABOUT JESUS
4. GO TO A BIBLE-BELIEVING CHURCH (where you can learn more about pleasing Him)

As a child of God, if you should sin again, stop and tell Him about it. He promises in His Word… “If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.” — 1 John 1:9 Ask God to help you live a life to please Him! Share the Good News of this story with someone else.


The Wordless Book has been used for many years by CEF (Child Evangelism Fellowship). These words are from CEF.


Photo Credits – Common Moorhen by Dan at Viera Wetlands; Hawaiian Coot (Fulica alai) Cropped ©WikiCPurple Gallinule (Porphyrio martinicus) by Densie Russell;

Secretarybird – The Note Taker

Secretarybird look straight at the lens – ©Pinterest – Rudi Luyten

You would like me to take a note?

Secretarybird -Notice the eyelashes – ©Pinterest

Looking down to start writing! [Notice the eyelashes]

“Let not mercy and truth forsake you; Bind them around your neck, Write them on the tablet of your heart,” (Proverbs 3:3 NKJV)

These Secretarybird photos were on Pinterest and I decided to share them.

Secretarybird (Sagittarius serpentarius) by Africaddict

Secretarybird (Sagittarius serpentarius) by Africaddict

Secretarybirds were named this because: “The secretary bird’s English name was once thought to come from the 1800s, when Europeans first spotted these birds. Back then, male secretaries wore gray tailcoats and dark knee-length pants. They also used goose-quill pens that they carried behind their ears. This long-legged bird shares many of these same physical features: long, dark quills at the back of the head; long, gray wing and tail feathers that resemble a tailcoat; and black feathers that go midway down the legs like short pants. It’s fun to imagine how the two “secretaries” compare!” From San Diego Zoo – Secretary Bird Nice photos in this article to check out!

Secretarybird (Sagittarius serpentarius) by Lee

Secretarybird (Sagittarius serpentarius) by Lee

These are one of my many favorite birds. With over 10,700 birds in the world, it is easy to have many favorites that the Lord, their Creator, has given us to enjoy.

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Secretary Bird – The Walker

The Wise Owl