Black-bellied Whistling-Duck Trying To Decide

Shall I Go To The This Way?

Shall I Go To That Way?

And Elijah came unto all the people, and said, How long halt ye between two opinions? if the LORD be God, follow him: but if Baal, then follow him. And the people answered him not a word. (1 Kings 18:21 KJV)

Still Undecided As To Which Way To Go by Lee

Elijah went there and stood in front of the people. He said, “How long will it take you to make up your minds? If the LORD is the one and only God, follow him. But if Baal is the one and only God, follow him.” The people didn’t say anything. (1 Kings 18:21 NIrV)

Just About Decided

Elijah challenged the people: “How long are you going to sit on the fence? If GOD is the real God, follow him; if it’s Baal, follow him. Make up your minds!” Nobody said a word; nobody made a move. (1 Kings 18:21 MSG)

This Black-bellied Whistling-Duck was undecided about where to go. There were quite a few Whistling Ducks at Viera Wetlands, and they were playing “musical palm tree stubs.” They kept landing on these tree tops and chasing the other off. Yet, this verse comes to mind.

I trust all of us are decided about WHO we are going to follow.

Now for a picture of a Black-bellied Whistling-Duck by Dan [the much better photographer]

Black-bellied Whistling Duck by Dan

The Black-bellied Whistling-Duck is a large, gooselike duck with a long neck, long legs, and short tail. In flight, look for their broad wings, long neck, and hunched back.

Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks are dark overall: a chestnut breast and black belly are set off by a bright-pink bill and legs, grayish face, and broad white wing stripe, also visible in flight. Immatures are duller than adults, with a dark bill, pale breast, and mottled black belly. [Info from All About Birds]
*

Andre Rieu – Amazing Grace

Thought you might enjoy this video. Andre Rieu – Amazing Grace

Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound,
That saved a wretch like me.
I once was lost but now am found,
Was blind, but now I see.

Graceful Prinia (Prinia gracilis) by Nikhil Devasar

Graceful Prinia (Prinia gracilis) by Nikhil Devasar

T’was Grace that taught my heart to fear.
And Grace, my fears relieved.
How precious did that Grace appear
The hour I first believed.

Injured Roseate Spoonbill at Flamingo Gardens by Lee

Through many dangers, toils and snares
I have already come;
‘Tis Grace that brought me safe thus far
and Grace will lead me home.

Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea) Neal Addy Gallery

Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea) Neal Addy Gallery

The Lord has promised good to me.
His word my hope secures.
He will my shield and portion be,
As long as life endures.

Yea, when this flesh and heart shall fail,
And mortal life shall cease,
I shall possess within the veil,
A life of joy and peace.

Brown-throated Sunbird (Anthreptes malacensis) ©WikiC

When we’ve been there ten thousand years
Bright shining as the sun.
We’ve no less days to sing God’s praise
Than when we’ve first begun.


Birds in Hymns

What will you do with Jesus?

 

More Robbers – Chapter 17

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) at Bok Tower By Dan'sPix

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) at Bok Tower By Dan’sPix

More Robbers

The Crow and the Blue Jay.

The Burgess Bird Book For Children

*

Listen to the story read.

CHAPTER 17. More Robbers.

By the sounds of rejoicing among the feathered folks of the Old Orchard Johnny Chuck knew that it was quite safe for him to come out. He was eager to tell Skimmer the Tree Swallow how glad he was that Mr. Blacksnake had been driven away before he could get Skimmer’s eggs. As he poked his head out of his doorway he became aware that something was still wrong in the Old Orchard. Into the glad chorus there broke a note of distress and sorrow. Johnny instantly recognized the voices of Welcome Robin and Mrs. Robin. There is not one among his feathered neighbors who can so express worry and sorrow as can the Robins.

Johnny was just in time to see all the birds hurrying over to that part of the Old Orchard where the Robins had built their home. The rejoicing suddenly gave way to cries of indignation and anger, and Johnny caught the words, “Robber! Thief! Wretch!” It appeared that there was just as much excitement over there as there had been when Mr. Blacksnake had been discovered trying to rob Skimmer and Mrs. Skimmer. It couldn’t be Mr. Blacksnake again, because Farmer Brown’s boy had chased him in quite another direction.

“What is it now?” asked Johnny of Skimmer, who was still excitedly discussing with Mrs. Skimmer their recent fright.

“I don’t know, but I’m going to find out,” replied Skimmer and darted away.

Johnny Chuck waited patiently. The excitement among the birds seemed to increase, and the chattering and angry cries grew louder. Only the voices of Welcome and Mrs. Robin were not angry. They were mournful, as if Welcome and Mrs. Robin were heartbroken. Presently Skimmer came back to tell Mrs. Skimmer the news.

“The Robins have lost their eggs!” he cried excitedly. “All four have been broken and eaten. Mrs. Robin left them to come over here to help drive away Mr. Blacksnake, and while she was here some one ate those eggs. Nobody knows who it could have been, because all the birds of the Old Orchard were over here at that time. It might leave been Chatterer the Red Squirrel, or it might have been Sammy Jay, or it might have been Creaker the Grackle, or it might have been Blacky the Crow. Whoever it was just took that chance to sneak over there and rob that nest when there was no one to see him.”

Crow at Flamingo Gardens by Lee (210)

Crow at Flamingo Gardens by Lee

Just then from over towards the Green Forest sounded a mocking “Caw, caw, caw!” Instantly the noise in the Old Orchard ceased for a moment. Then it broke out afresh. There wasn’t a doubt now in any one’s mind. Blacky the Crow was the robber. How those tongues did go! There was nothing too bad to say about Blacky. And such dreadful things as those birds promised to do to Blacky the Crow if ever they should catch him in the Old Orchard.

“Caw, caw, caw!” shouted Blacky from the distance, and his voice sounded very much as if he thought he had done something very smart. It was quite clear that at least he was not sorry for what he had done.

All the birds were so excited and so angry, as they gathered around Welcome and Mrs. Robin trying to comfort them, that it was some time before their indignation meeting broke up and they returned to their own homes and duties. Almost at once there was another cry of distress. Mr. and Mrs. Chebec had been robbed of their eggs! While they had been attending the indignation meeting at the home of the Robins, a thief had taken the chance to steal their eggs and get away.

Of course right away all the birds hurried over to sympathize with the Chebecs and to repeat against the unknown thief all the threats they had made against Blacky the Crow. They knew it couldn’t have been Blacky this time because they had heard Blacky cawing over on the edge of the Green Forest. In the midst of the excited discussion as to who the thief was, Weaver the Orchard Oriole spied a blue and white feather on the ground just below Chebec’s nest.

“It was Sammy Jay! There is no doubt about it, it was Sammy Jay!” he cried.

At the sight of that telltale feather all the birds knew that Weaver was right, and led by Scrapper the Kingbird they began a noisy search of the Old Orchard for the sly robber. But Sammy wasn’t to be found, and they soon gave up the search, none daring to stay longer away from his own home lest something should happen there. Welcome and Mrs. Robin continued to cry mournfully, but little Mr. and Mrs. Chebec bore their trouble almost silently.

“There is one thing about it,” said Mr. Chebec to his sorrowful little wife, “that egg of Sally Sly’s went with the rest, and we won’t have to raise that bothersome orphan.”

“That’s true,” said she. “There is no use crying over what can’t be helped. It is a waste of time to sit around crying. Come on, Chebec, let’s look for a place to build another nest. Next time I won’t leave the eggs unwatched for a minute.”

Meanwhile Jenny Wren’s tongue was fairly flying as she chattered to Peter Rabbit, who had come up in the midst of the excitement and of course had to know all about it.

Fish Crow (Corvus ossifragus) at Lake Morton By Dan'sPix

Fish Crow (Corvus ossifragus) at Lake Morton By Dan’sPix

Blacky the Crow has a heart as black as his coat, and his cousin Sammy Jay isn’t much better,” declared Jenny. “They belong to a family of robbers.”

“Wait a minute,” cried Peter. “Do you mean to say that Blacky the Crow and Sammy Jay are cousins?”

“For goodness’ sake, Peter!” exclaimed Jenny, “do you mean to say that you don’t know that? Of course they’re cousins. They don’t look much alike, but they belong to the same family. I would expect almost anything bad of any one as black as Blacky the Crow. But how such a handsome fellow as Sammy Jay can do such dreadful things I don’t understand. He isn’t as bad as Blacky, because he does do a lot of good. He destroys a lot of caterpillars and other pests.

“There are no sharper eyes anywhere than those of Sammy Jay, and I’ll have to say this for him, that whenever he discovers any danger he always gives us warning. He has saved the lives of a good many of us feathered folks in this way. If it wasn’t for this habit of stealing our eggs I wouldn’t have a word to say against him, but at that, he isn’t as bad as Blacky the Crow. They say Blacky does some good by destroying white grubs and some other harmful pests, but he’s a regular cannibal, for he is just as fond of young birds as he is of eggs, and the harm he does in this way is more than the good he does in other ways. He’s bold, black, and bad, if you ask me.”

Remembering her household duties, Jenny Wren disappeared inside her house in her usual abrupt fashion. Peter hung around for a while but finding no one who would take the time to talk to him he suddenly decided to go over to the Green Forest to look for some of his friends there. He had gone but a little way in the Green Forest when he caught a glimpse of a blue form stealing away through the trees. He knew it in an instant, for there is no one with such a coat but Sammy Jay. Peter glanced up in the tree from which Sammy had flown and there he saw a nest in a crotch halfway up. “I wonder,” thought Peter, “if Sammy was stealing eggs there, or if that is his own nest.” Then he started after Sammy as fast as he could go, lipperty-lipperty-lip. As he ran he happened to look back and was just in time to see Mrs. Jay slip on to the nest. Then Peter knew that he had discovered Sammy’s home. He chuckled as he ran.

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) by Daves BirdingPix

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) by Daves BirdingPix

I’ve found out your secret, Sammy Jay!” cried Peter when at last he caught up with Sammy.

“Then I hope you’ll be gentleman enough to keep it,” grumbled Sammy, looking not at all pleased.

“Certainly,” replied Peter with dignity. “I wouldn’t think of telling any one. My, what a handsome fellow you are, Sammy.”

Sammy looked pleased. He is a little bit vain, is Sammy Jay. There is no denying that he is handsome. He is just a bit bigger than Welcome Robin. His back is grayish-blue. His tail is a bright blue crossed with little black bars and edged with white. His wings are blue with white and black bars. His throat and breast are a soft grayish-white, and he wears a collar of black. On his head he wears a pointed cap, a very convenient cap, for at times he draws it down so that it is not pointed at all.

“Why did you steal Mrs. Chebec’s eggs?” demanded Peter abruptly.

Sammy didn’t look the least bit put out. “Because I like eggs,” he replied promptly. “If people will leave their eggs unguarded they must expect to lose them. How did you know I took those eggs?”

“Never mind, Sammy; never mind. A little bird told me,” retorted Peter mischievously.

Sammy opened his mouth for a sharp reply, but instead he uttered a cry of warning. “Run, Peter! Run! Here comes Reddy Fox!” he cried.

Peter dived headlong under a great pile of brush. There he was quite safe. While he waited for Reddy Fox to go away he thought about Sammy Jay. “It’s funny,” he mused, “how so much good and so much bad can be mixed together. Sammy Jay stole Chebec’s eggs, and then he saved my life. I just know he would have done as much for Mr. and Mrs. Chebec, or for any other feathered neighbor. He can only steal eggs for a little while in the spring. I guess on the whole he does more good than harm. I’m going to think so anyway.”

Peter was quite right. Sammy Jay does do more good than harm.

*

When they found the feather, a verse comes to mind:

… and be sure your sin will find you out.  (Numbers 32:23b NKJV)

*

  • Why were Welcome Robin and Mrs. Robin upset?
  • Which bird was the one who destroyed the eggs?
  • What did their friends try to do to help the Robins?
  • Should we do that for our friends also?
  • Who was the next robber?
  • How did they know it was him?
  • Both the Crow and the Blue Jay are cousins. Why?
  • Why did Peter decide that Sammy Blue Jay was okay?
  • Can we sin just a little and then do lots of good? Does that make it right?

Therefore comfort each other and edify one another, just as you also are doing. (1 Thessalonians 5:11 NKJV)

Links:

*

Links:

Redtail the Hawk - Burgess Bird Book ©©Thum

 

 

 

Next Chapter (Some Homes in the Green Forest. Coming Soon)


Burgess-Bird-Book-for-Children

 

 Burgess-Bird-Book-for-Children

 

 


 

 

Wordless Birds

 

 


*

 

 

Birds Who Build Pyramids by Creation Moments

BIRDS WHO BUILD PYRAMIDS

Listen and or Watch


Job 12:7″But ask now the beasts, and they shall teach thee; and the fowls of the air, and they shall tell thee…”

Bee-eaters are birds whose way of life and behavior are both intelligent and unusual. There are 24 species of bee-eaters.
Birds Who Build Pyramids
Bee-eaters make their living catching and eating bees and wasps with stingers. The poison in many of these stinging insects is powerful enough to kill bee-eaters, but the birds are not only skilled at avoiding stings, they know how to remove the poison from the bee when they eat it. Having captured a bee or wasp, a bee-eater will take it to a branch where he will pound its head and rub its stinging end until all of the poison has been removed from the insect’s venom sac. Once the poison is removed, the bee-eater enjoys lunch.

Bee-eaters are described as lively and sociable. You seldom see one roosting all by itself. And when the weather is cool, bee-eaters huddle together to keep each other warm. There are even reports that bee-eaters will roost on each other’s backs, forming a feathered pyramid made out of birds.

Bee-eaters Huddled Together – from email

Now, it’s possible that bee-eaters figured out that they were warmer when huddled together, although even that much intelligence had to come from their Creator. But how could bee-eaters simply “discover” how to detoxify bees? If this ability evolved by trial and error, there would probably be no descendants of the first bee-eaters around today. Obviously, this dangerous behavior would not favor survival. This makes the bee-eater one of God’s own arguments against evolution!

Southern Carmine Bee-eater (Merops nubicus) by Marc at Africaddict

Southern Carmine Bee-eater (Merops nubicus) by Marc at Africaddict

Prayer: “Lord, not only does Your wisdom surround us, but You have so generously given intelligence and wisdom to so many of Your creatures. I thank You for the wonder Your handiwork inspires. In Jesus’ Name. Amen.

Notes:
Clanbake. Natural History, Mar. 1990. p. 94. Photo: A male Blue-throated Bee-eater presents his mate with a captured insect. Photo taken by Lip Kee Yap and licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Used with permission of Creation Moments

 

Tawny Frogmouths at the Zoo

Tawny Frogmouth at Brevard Zoo 4-3-18 by Lee

At the Brevard Zoo recently, we saw two Tawny Frogmouths. They were in one of their aviaries. [An aviary is a large area where birds can fly freely.] It also makes it easier to take photos, because you are in the aviary with the birds and critters. You do not have to take the photos through cage wires, etc.

Tawny Frogmouth [either young or famale] at Brevard Zoo

“Hide not thy face from me in the day when I am in trouble; incline thine ear unto me: in the day when I call answer me speedily.” (Psalms 102:2 KJV)

The Tawny Frogmouth (Podargus strigoides) is a species of frogmouth native to and found throughout the Australian mainland and Tasmania. Tawny frogmouths are big-headed, stocky birds often mistaken for owls due to their nocturnal habits [night time] and similar coloring.

Tawny Frogmouth at Brevard Zoo 4-3-18 by Lee

Fun Fact: “Their silvery-grey plumage patterned with white, black, and brown streaks and mottles allows them to freeze into the form of a broken tree branch and become practically invisible in broad daylight.”

This one might be thinking, “What you looking at?

Tawny Frogmouth at Brevard Zoo 4-3-18 by Lee

“Watch and pray, lest you enter into temptation. The spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak.” (Matthew 26:41 NKJV)


Big Feet

Young Gallinule at Viera Wetlands

On the Fourth of July, yesterday, we were at Viera Wetlands, Viera, Florida and spotted this young Common Gallinule, depending on what they are calling it. Look at its feet. He/she has some growing to do to fit those feet.

Below is how it will look when it matures.

Common Gallinule (Gallinula chloropus) by Reinier Munguia

“I have been young, and now am old; yet have I not seen the righteous forsaken, nor his seed begging bread.” (Psalms 37:25 KJV)

Another promise our Savior and Creator has given us. Lord’s Blessings.

Common Gallinule – All About Birds

Shield of Thy Salvation

Cardinal Parents at Brevard Zoo

Cardinal Brevard Zoo

At the Brevard Zoo today, we saw some Northern Cardinals flying really close to where I was standing.

Cardinal Brevard Zoo 7-3-18

I was enjoying getting some photos, when we noticed that they were feeding a youngster who had fallen out of the nest. It had landed on a palm leaf right above the walkway where I was standing.

Cardinal Baby Brevard Zoo 7-3-18

That is when I realized the Momma Cardinal was also keeping an eye on the situation.

Momma Cardinal Brevard Zoo 7-3-1

We were quite concerned that it might fall into the walkway and someone would step on it accidentally. At the next exhibit, we told the keeper. He asked if it was the one in the palm tree. Yes. Well, he had just put it back in the next about 10 minutes before. Said he would go back and put it back in again.

We sure hope it makes it and quits getting out of the nest. It is too small to survive on its own and can’t fly yet. He also told us that there were no other little ones in the nest. I am sure that those concerned Cardinals will do their best.

“I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.” (Psalms 50:11 KJV)

I know the Lord, who Created Cardinals, knows all about the situation. If He cares about the littlest baby Cardinal, rest assured, He cares about you and I.

Photos aren’t the best, but I am writing this on my laptop and away from the editing program.

Beautiful Scissor-Tailed Birds

In JJSJ’s [Dr. Jim] article, Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher, Oklahoma’s Long-tailed State Bird, he introduced the beautiful Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher. I would like to show you three more “scissor-tailed” birds.

The word “Scissor” is not mentioned in the Bible, at least that I can find. Yet, God told us in His Word:

“This shall be written for the generation to come: and the people which shall be created shall praise the LORD.” (Psalms 102:18 KJV)

“Let them praise the name of the LORD: for he commanded, and they were created.” (Psalms 148:5 KJV) [Refers to the heavens and these beautiful birds fly in the sky, which was created.


Scissor-tailed Hummingbird (Hylonympha macrocerca)

Scissor-tailed Hummingbird from Speak up for the Voices

Scissor-tailed Hummingbird (Hylonympha macrocerca) Endangered

Speak Up For The Voices Article About Scissor-tailed Hummingbird


Scissor-tailed Kite (Chelictinia riocourii) ©WikiC

Scissor-tailed Kite (Chelictinia riocourii) ©WikiC

Scissor-tailed Kite (Chelictinia riocourii)

Today we rode over to Melbourne, Florida (90 miles) for the one-year checkup of my back surgery. We were blessed to see one of the Scissor-tailed Kites flying along in the field. They are here in Florida for a few months, starting in April or May. We always enjoy watching them, especially when they turn and you get a glimpse of the “scissor” tail.

Scissor-tailed Kite (Chelictinia riocourii) ©Flickr Lawrence C

Scissor-tailed Kite (Chelictinia riocourii) ©Flickr Ron Knight


Scissor-tailed Nightjar (Hydropsalis torquata)

Scissor-tailed Nightjar (Hydropsalis torquata) by ©AGros

Scissor-tailed Nightjar (Hydropsalis torquata) ©WikiC

Scissor-tailed Nightjar (Hydropsalis torquata) ©WikiC


Check these links:

Scissor-tailed Nightjar (Hydropsalis torquata)

Scissor-tailed Hummingbird (Hylonympha macrocerca)

Scissor-tailed Kite (Chelictinia riocourii)

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus)

A Robber in the Old Orchard – Chapter 16

Purple Martin (Progne subis) ©USFWS

A Robber in the Old Orchard

The Purple Martin and the Barn Swallow.

The Burgess Bird Book For Children

*

CHAPTER 16. A Robber in the Old Orchard.

“I don’t believe it,” muttered Johnny Chuck out loud. “I don’t believe Jenny Wren knows what she’s talking about.”

“What is it Jenny Wren has said that you don’t believe?” demanded Skimmer the Tree Swallow, as he once more settled himself in his doorway.

“She said that Hummer the Hummingbird is a sort of second cousin to Sooty the Chimney Swift,” replied Johnny Chuck.

“Well, it’s so, if you don’t believe it,” declared Skimmer. “I don’t see that that is any harder to believe than that you are cousin to Striped Chipmunk and Nappy Jack the Gray Squirrel. To look at you no one would ever think you are a member of the Squirrel family, but you must admit that you are.”

PAS-Hiru Purple Martin (Progne subis) ©WikiCJohnny Chuck nodded his head thoughtfully. “Yes,” said he, “I am, even if I don’t look it. This is a funny world, isn’t it? You can’t always tell by a person’s looks who he may be related to. Now that I’ve found out that Sooty isn’t related to you and is related to Hummer, I’ll never dare guess again about anybody’s relatives. I always supposed Twitter the Martin to be a relative of yours, but now that I’ve learned that Sooty isn’t, I suspect that Twitter isn’t either.”

“Oh, yes, he is,” replied Skimmer promptly. “He’s the largest of the Swallow family, and we all feel very proud of him. Everybody loves him.”

“Is he as black as he looks, flying round up in the air?” asked Johnny Chuck. “He never comes down here as you do where a fellow can get a good look at him.”

“Yes,” replied Skimmer, “he dresses all in black, but it is a beautiful blue-black, and when the sun shines on his back it seems to be almost purple. That is why some folks call him the Purple Martin. He is one of the most social fellows I know of. I like a home by myself, such as I’ve got here, but Twitter loves company. He likes to live in an apartment house with a lot of his own kind. That is why he always looks for one of those houses with a lot of rooms in it, such as Farmer Brown’s boy has put up on the top of that tall pole out in his back yard. He pays for all the trouble Farmer Brown’s boy took to put that house up. If there is anybody who catches more flies and winged insects than Twitter, I don’t know who it is.”

Barn Swallow in Cades Cove by Dan

Barn Swallow in Cades Cove by Dan

“How about me?” demanded a new voice, as a graceful form skimmed over Johnny Chuck’s head, and turning like a flash, came back. It was Forktail the Barn Swallow, the handsomest and one of the most graceful of all the Swallow family. He passed so close to Johnny that the latter had a splendid chance to see and admire his glistening steel-blue back and the beautiful chestnut-brown of his forehead and throat with its narrow black collar, and the brown to buff color of his under parts. But the thing that was most striking about him was his tail, which was so deeply forked as to seem almost like two tails.

“I would know him as far as I could see him just by his tail alone,” exclaimed Johnny. “I don’t know of any other tail at all like it.”

“There isn’t any other like it,” declared Skimmer. “If Twitter the Martin is the largest of our family, Forktail is the handsomest.”

“How about my usefulness?” demanded Forktail, as he came skimming past again. “Cousin Twitter certainly does catch a lot of flies and insects but I’m willing to go against him any day to see who can catch the most.”

With this he darted away. Watching him they saw him alight on the top of Farmer Brown’s barn. “It’s funny,” remarked Johnny Chuck, “but as long as I’ve known Forktail, and I’ve known him ever since I was big enough to know anybody, I’ve never found out how he builds his nest. I’ve seen him skimming over the Green Meadows times without number, and often he comes here to the Old Orchard as he did just now, but I’ve never seen him stop anywhere except over on that barn.”

“That’s where he nests,” chuckled Skimmer.

“What?” cried Johnny Chuck. “Do you mean to say he nests on Farmer Brown’s barn?”

“No,” replied Skimmer. “He nests in it. That’s why he is called the Barn Swallow, and why you never have seen his nest. If you’ll just go over to Farmer Brown’s barn and look up in the roof, you’ll see Forktail’s nest there somewhere.”

“Me go over to Farmer Brown’s barn!” exclaimed Johnny Chuck. “Do you think I’m crazy?”

Skimmer chuckled. “Forktail isn’t crazy,” said he, “and he goes in and out of that barn all day long. I must say I wouldn’t care to build in such a place myself, but he seems to like it. There’s one thing about it, his home is warm and dry and comfortable, no matter what the weather is. I wouldn’t trade with him, though. No, sir, I wouldn’t trade with him for anything. Give me a hollow in a tree well lined with feathers to a nest made of mud and straw, even if it is feather-lined.”

“Do you mean that such a neat-looking, handsome fellow as Forktail uses mud in his nest?” cried Johnny.

Skimmer bobbed his head. “He does just that,” said he. “He’s something like Welcome Robin in this respect. I—”

But Johnny Chuck never knew what Skimmer was going to say next, for Skimmer happened at that instant to glance up. For an instant he sat motionless with horror, then with a shriek he darted out into the air. At the sound of that shriek Mrs. Skimmer, who all the time had been sitting on her eggs inside the hollow of the tree, darted out of her doorway, also shrieking. For a moment Johnny Chuck couldn’t imagine what could be the trouble. Then a slight rustling drew his eyes to a crotch in the tree a little above the doorway of Skimmer’s home. There, partly coiled around a branch, with head swaying to and fro, eyes glittering and forked tongue darting out and in, as he tried to look down into Skimmer’s nest, was Mr. Blacksnake.

Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) WikiC

Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) WikiC

It seemed to Johnny as if in a minute every bird in the Old Orchard had arrived on the scene. Such a shrieking and screaming as there was! First one and then another would dart at Mr. Blacksnake, only to lose courage at the last second and turn aside. Poor Skimmer and his little wife were frantic. They did their utmost to distract Mr. Blacksnake’s attention, darting almost into his very face and then away again before he could strike. But Mr. Blacksnake knew that they were powerless to hurt him, and he knew that there were eggs in that nest. There is nothing he loves better than eggs unless it is a meal of baby birds. Beyond hissing angrily two or three times he paid no attention to Skimmer or his friends, but continued to creep nearer the entrance to that nest.

At last he reached a position where he could put his head in the doorway. As he did so, Skimmer and Mrs. Skimmer each gave a little cry of hopelessness and despair. But no sooner had his head disappeared in the hole in the old apple-tree than Scrapper the Kingbird struck him savagely. Instantly Mr. Blacksnake withdrew his head, hissing fiercely, and struck savagely at the birds nearest him. Several times the same thing happened. No sooner would his head disappear in that hole than Scrapper or one or the other of Skimmer’s friends, braver than the rest, would dart in and peck at him viciously, and all the time all the birds were screaming as only excited feathered folk can. Johnny Chuck was quite as excited as his feathered friends, and so intent watching the hated black robber that he had eyes for nothing else. Suddenly he heard a step just behind him. He turned his head and then frantically dived head first down into his hole. He had looked right up into the eyes of Farmer Brown’s boy!

“Ha, ha!” cried Farmer Brown’s boy, “I thought as much!” And with a long switch he struck Mr. Blacksnake just as the latter had put his head in that doorway, resolved to get those eggs this time. But when he felt that switch and heard the voice of Farmer Brown’s boy he changed his mind in a flash. He simply let go his hold on that tree and dropped. The instant he touched the ground he was off like a shot for the safety of the old stone wall, Farmer Brown’s boy after him. Farmer Brown’s boy didn’t intend to kill Mr. Blacksnake, but he did want to give him such a fright that he wouldn’t visit the Old Orchard again in a hurry, and this he quite succeeded in doing.

No sooner had Mr. Blacksnake disappeared than all the birds set up such a rejoicing that you would have thought they, and not Farmer Brown’s boy, had saved the eggs of Mr. and Mrs. Skimmer. Listening to them, Johnny Chuck just had to smile.

Listen to the story read.

 

Barn Swallow at the New Mexico Welcome Center

Barn Swallow at the New Mexico Welcome Center by Lee

Yea, the sparrow hath found an house, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, even thine altars, O LORD of hosts, my King, and my God. (Psalms 84:3 KJV)

Links:

*

Links:

Goldie the Baltimore Oriole, Sammy Jay - Burgess Bird Book ©©Thum

 

  Next Chapter (More Robbers. Coming Soon)

 

 

Burgess-Bird-Book-for-Children

 

 

  Burgess-Bird-Book-for-Children

 

  

  Wordless Birds

 

*

Scarlet-plus Birds

Scarlet-chested Sunbird (Chalcomitra senegalensis) ©WikiC

“Come now, and let us reason together, saith the LORD: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool.” (Isaiah 1:18 KJV)

“They shall spread over them a scarlet cloth, …” (Numbers 4:8a NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Scarlet II

Scarlet
This dye was obtained by the Egyptians from the shell-fish Carthamus tinctorius; and by the Hebrews from the Coccus ilicis, an insect which infests oak trees, called kermes by the Arabians.
This colour was early known (Gen_38:28). It was one of the colours of the ephod (Exo_28:6), the girdle (Exo_28:8), and the breastplate (Exo_28:15) of the high priest. It is also mentioned in various other connections (Jos_2:18; 2Sa_1:24; Lam_4:5; Nah_2:3). A scarlet robe was in mockery placed on our Lord (Mat_27:28; Luk_23:11). “Sins as scarlet” (Isa_1:18), i.e., as scarlet robes “glaring and habitual.” Scarlet and crimson were the firmest of dyes, and thus not easily washed out. [Easton’s Bible Dictionary]

Crimson, red, purple, and scarlet:
Used in the symbolisms of the tabernacle furnishings and priestly vestments and functions, as types and shadows of the atonement. ]Nave’s Topical Bible]


There are so many birds whose names begin with “Scarlet-“, that I decided to do a Part II. I want to show more of God’s Handiwork in the Avian Creations. These are by far not all of them.

Scarlet-and-white Tanager (Chrysothlypis salmoni) ©WikiC

Scarlet-browed Tanager (Heterospingus xanthopygius) ©WikiC

Scarlet-browed Tanager (Heterospingus xanthopygius) ©WikiC

Scarlet-browed Tanager (Heterospingus xanthopygius) ©WikiC

Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus igniventris) ©Flickr Joao Quental

Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus igniventris) ©Flickr vll.sandl

Scarlet-rumped Cacique (Cacicus microrhynchus) ©WikiC

Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum cruentatum) ©Flickr Dave Curtis

The scarlet-throated Frigate bird, Galapagos islands, EcuadorFrom Pinterest

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum cruentatum) by ©Wiki

Scarlet-headed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum trochileum) by© Wiki

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©©LipKee

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©©LipKee

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©WikiC

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©WikiC

Scarlet-headed Blackbird (Amblyramphus holosericeus) by Lee

Scarlet-headed Blackbird asleep by Lee

Scarlet-headed Blackbird by Dan

Scarlet-headed Blackbird (Amblyramphus holosericeus) by Dan


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

Wordless Birds

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Scarlet Birds

Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) by Dario Sanches

Scarlet Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) by Dario Sanches

She is not afraid of snow for her household, For all her household is clothed with scarlet. (Proverbs 31:21 NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Scarlet

SC’ARLET, n.
1. A beautiful bright red color, brighter than crimson.
2. Cloth of a scarlet color.
All her household are clothed with scarlet. Prov 31.
SC’ARLET, a. of the color called scarlet; of a bright red color; as a scarlet cloth or thread; a scarlet lip.


Scarlet Birds

Scarlet Finch

Scarlet Finch (Haematospiza sipahi) by Nikhil Devasar

Scarlet Finch (Haematospiza sipahi) by Nikhil Devasar

Scarlet Flycatcher

Scarlet Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) by Dario Sanches

Scarlet Ibis

Scarlet Ibis (Eudocimus ruber) ©whm.ac.uk

Scarlet Macaw

Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao) by Lee at Brevard Zoo

Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao) by Lee at Brevard Zoo

Scarlet Minivet

Scarlet Minivet (Pericrocotus speciosus) by Ian

Scarlet Myzomela

Scarlet Honeyeater or Myzolema (Myzomela sanguinolenta) by Tom Tarrant

Scarlet Robin

Scarlet Robin (Petroica boodang) by Ian

Scarlet Robin (Petroica boodang) by Ian

Scarlet Tanager

Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) by Kent Nickell

Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) by Kent Nickell

“And they stripped Him and put a scarlet robe on Him. When they had twisted a crown of thorns, they put it on His head, and a reed in His right hand. And they bowed the knee before Him and mocked Him, saying, “Hail, King of the Jews!” (Matthew 27:28-29 NKJV)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

Wordless Toucan

*
[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]