Let Birds Flying Across The Expanse – Creation Moments

LET BIRDS FLY ACROSS THE EXPANSE

Genesis 1:20

“And God said, Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creature that hath life, and fowl that may fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven.”

On the fifth day of the Creation Week, God created swarms of sea creatures. He also created flying creatures. In Genesis 1:20, God says: “Let birds fly above the earth across the expanse of the heavens.” The birds were not, in fact, in the firmament. When the KJV translates the phrase as “in the open firmament”, the word open reminds us that the birds are simply seen against the background of the firmament, and are not in it. We heard in the previous Creation Moment that God created whole swarms of sea creatures. It could also be assumed that He created a very large variety of flying creatures.

This brings us to the fact that many translations tell us that God made birds. The KJV refers to fowl. The use of a word other than bird in the KJV is significant. The Hebrew word is ôph (עוֹף). There is another Hebrew word that means birds. It is tsippor(צִפּוֹר). In fact, the word ôph is much wider in meaning than birds and includes all flying creatures. For instance, in Leviticus 11:13-19, the bat is included at the end of a list of birds. But the collective word used in Leviticus 11:13 is ôph, not tsippor. So ôph does not really mean birds – it means flying creatures. Hence, the creation of flying creatures in Genesis 1:20 includes not only birds, but also bats, and, by implication, flying insects also – and pterosaurs – the flying dinosaurs.

Once again, we notice the efficiency and economy of the words used in Genesis 1, which gives far more information than at first we think.  

Prayer: Your wonderful book, the Bible, astonishes us again and again as it explains to us how and why You created this world. Thank You for the wide variety of creatures that You put in the world. Amen.

Ref: Sarfati, J. (2015), The Genesis Account, (Powder Springs, GA: CMI), pp. 223-225. Image: Adobe Stock Images, licensed to author.

©Creation Moments 2019, Used with permission.


A very interesting study of the creation of the “fowls/birds.” Would make for a good BIrds of the Bible article, but they beat me to it. :)

Part III – 11th Anniversary of Blogging About Birds

Firey-throated and Volcano Hummingbird ©Raymond Barlow

I trust the last two posts have been informative and a blessing. Eleventh Anniversary and Eleventh Anniversary II. It still amazes me how the Lord would choose to use us in even a small way. If you have followed Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures very long, you know I believe that all these beautiful birds are a gift from the Lord’s Creative hand. They did not evolve from some blob or a dinosaur. The Bible has given us too many proofs of this, unless you have chosen not to believe His Word. I have no problem believing the following verses:

“And God created great whales, and every living creature that moveth, which the waters brought forth abundantly, after their kind, and every winged fowl after his kind: and God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, Be fruitful, and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let fowl multiply in the earth. And the evening and the morning were the fifth day.” (Genesis 1:21-23 KJV)

Watching Birds at MacDill AFB Shore

Nor believing that Adam named those first critters, including the birds:

“Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name. So Adam gave names to all cattle, to the birds of the air, and to every beast of the field. But for Adam there was not found a helper comparable to him.” (Genesis 2:19-20 NKJV)

Of course today, the I.O.C. gets together with many ornithologist from around the world to name birds. Adam didn’t need a committee at that time. He was the only human present. Eve came after the naming. [They, IOC, have increased their numbers by over 400 newly named birds since the Birds of the World section was added.]

Black-capped Foliage-gleaner (Philydor atricapillus) by Dario Sanches

Black-capped Foliage-gleaner (Philydor atricapillus) by Dario Sanches

Back to the reviewing of the past eleven years. From the beginning, the Lord’s Word about the birds has been the main part as I tried to find the various birds mentioned in the Bible. From there is has grown in various ways, but always, God’s Words are mentioned. Almost all of our writers, that thankfully add to this blog, believe that these fantastic birds are from God’s Hand.

The Seventh Anniversary in 2015 revealed that there had been 1.3 million visits and there were over 1,100 followers. Wow! By then Golden Eagle, Dr. James J. S. Johnson and Emma Foster were writing articles. Enough to have their own page in the menu [left side].

Must have skipped the 8th and 9th anniversaries, but much was going on. The Birds of the Bible for Kids blog was being re-fired up and most of the articles were move back over to there.

Dust Storm in Texas in 1935 ©WikiC

The Tenth anniversary had me Really Kicking Up A Dust Storm, sometime during those years, somehow, this site was hacked. Many of the photos used in post were GONE. The “pipe dream” of having a photo of every bird in the world blew up. This really involved much work to fix all the broken links that caused. Now in the Birds of the World, the list of the birds are there, but with some photos at the end of the page. [This was the only way to fix hundreds of broken links.]

If you have a blog or are thinking about starting one, they are enjoyable, but there can be issues that can “spoil the vines. “Take us the foxes, the little foxes, that spoil the vines: for our vines have tender grapes.” (Song of Solomon 2:15 KJV) Do we throw in the towel, or do we continue? So far, we have continued. Else we wouldn’t be celebrating 11 years of blogging.

Hummingbird at Trumpet Vine ©Harold A Davis

The Lord has been very gracious. We have made many friends over the years because of this blog. I feel like I know some of you personally, even though we probably won’t meet until we arrive in heaven. Thanks for all the friendships that have developed over these many years. The Lord truly has been blessing.

Tomorrow, I hope to add at least one more post to this anniversary remembrances.

Wordless Birds – With Hummingbirds

 

 

Part II – 11 Years of Blogging About Birds

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) by Dan

“Remember His marvelous works which He has done, His wonders, and the judgments of His mouth,” (1 Chronicles 16:12 NKJV)

Yesterday, the Eleventh Anniversary of Blogging About Birds article mentioned our early beginnings for this blog. Today, I’d like to continue with what the Lord has enabled us to do. Over the years, there have been Anniversary articles written. Each one tried to update the latest events, but also, to look back and thank the Lord for His blessings. The Lord wants us to “Remember.” His blessings.

“Remember to magnify His work, Of which men have sung.” (Job 36:24 NKJV)

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) by Dan

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) by Dan

Here are six of those years:

“I remember the days of old; I meditate on all Your works; I muse on the work of Your hands.” (Psalms 143:5 NKJV)

Actually, yesterday, I used a quotes from Jim Elliot, but was actually thinking of a quote I used in the Happy One Year Anniversary! article. This is what happens as you age. :) Both men were great missionaries and showed tremendous insight in their quotes.

“Our pastor just reminded us of a quote by William Carey, an English Missionary to India:

“Expect great things from God, attempt great things for God.”

That article was reposted in 2017. Looking Back – Happy One Year Anniversary! – Repost

In 2010, the 2nd Anniversary rolled around and some quest writers were added. Also, Ian Montgomery started allowing his Bird of the Week articles to be posted. Also, the Plus section, Birds of the World, and Birds in Hymns started up. This is all covered in Second Anniversary of Blog

It appears that I forgot to produce a Third or Fourth year anniversary article. Plenty was going on. The number of visitors to this blog, for which I am thankful for everyone who visits every time, was up to 250,000 on Apr. 9, 2011. 500,000 visits by Mar. 1, 2012, and about 850,000 by the time the Fifth Anniversary rolled around. Formed by Him started around the beginning of 2012. Also, many very talented photographers allowed me the permission to use their photos. There has been a list of them in the right column for years.

White-throated Sparrow by Ray Barlow

In 2013, I remembered to produce a Fifth Blog Anniversary post. There I mentioned the second blog site, Birds of the Bible for Kids. That website was started to get back to the roots of the whole purpose of blogging. That is, introducing young people to the Birds that are mentioned in the Bible. Like this main blog, it also has had growing pains. It was started, then I killed it and moved all the articles over here. Then last year, I decided to restart it back up. Much of the ups and downs of doing the “kids blog” has been due to my health issues. Right now it is up and running, not full speed, but then, neither am I running at full speed. Though I am much improved from last summer’s back surgery. Let’s hope and pray that the young people’s blog starts producing more articles.

I forgot again on the Sixth anniversary of the blog, but WordPress reminded me. Never Give Up

“The steps of a good man are ordered by the LORD, And He delights in his way. Though he fall, he shall not be utterly cast down; For the LORD upholds him with His hand. I have been young, and now am old; Yet I have not seen the righteous forsaken, Nor his descendants begging bread.” (Psalms 37:23-25 NKJV)

Enough for now. I trust you are enjoying seeing how the Lord leads in our lives. Who ever thought that six years into doing a blog would have lead me to that point. I’ll tell you more in the next part.

Whatever your talent or abilities, if you know the Lord as your Savior, let Him use you. This is just a little blog in the midst of millions, yet the Lord has been using it. That is what I read from your remarks. Thank you for visiting over the years.

Using Whatever Talent the Lord Has Given You written Sept 16, 2010

You are never too young to do your best! Especially, if you have accepted the Lord as your Savior.

Wordless Toucan

Part I – 11 Years of Blogging About Birds

Wood Stork by Lee

“But now ask the beasts, and they will teach you; And the birds of the air, and they will tell you;” Job 12:7

This is being shared from Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures Plus. It is the home blog of this website.

The idea for the Birds of the Bible lessons began when we were members of Bethany Baptist Church in Avon Park, Florida. I used to carry a laptop into a junior Sunday School class, and for five minutes each week, present a different bird mentioned in the Bible.

Then, we moved up to Winter Haven and began attending Faith Baptist Church, where we are still members. For two years there was no outlet for me to present my birds. When Stephen, the assistant to the pastor, at that time, became aware of what I did, he offered me a chance to post on The Fountain. [The church’s blog] I have written about this before, but am still surprised at how the Lord has allowed me to continue this adventure for so long. On February 15th, 2019, it will be eleven years since this began.

The Fountain was/is on the Blogger platform where I cut my “blogging teeth.” They stopped using the blog in 2013, but have kept all their post. So, all my beginning blogs are still there, along with my learning process. Lee’s Birdwatching Adventure was begun so I could learn how to layout articles for the church blog.

My first blog in February, 2008: Birds of the Bible – Introduction (by Lee Dusing)

American White Pelicans at Lake Hollingsworth

On July 05, 2008, Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures Plus was created on the WordPress platform, where it still is today. All those original articles were moved over to the new blog and removed from the old one. What they look like on the church’s blog is how they looked originally.

When all this began, it never crossed my mind that the Lord would allow it to grow to where it is today.  Our pastor is always challenging us to give the Lord whatever talent or ability we have. Let Him decide how it is to be used, and be willing to let Him use us.

“So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” So the evening and the morning were the fifth day.” (Genesis 1:21-23 NKJV)

Thank you Lord for letting me love you and your created critters, especially the birds of the air. Another saying our pastor uses is from Missionary Jim Elliot: “He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose.” There has been many hours given, and I won’t know until heaven to find out what rewards these efforts may have earned.

Looking through Jim Elliot’s quotes on that link, I found these also:

“Wherever you are, be all there! Live to the hilt every situation you believe to be the will of God. ― Jim Elliot

“God always gives his best to those who leave the choice with him.” ― Jim Elliot

“Oh, the fullness, pleasure, sheer excitement of knowing God on earth!”― Jim Elliot

“Lord, make my way prosperous not that I achieve high station, but that my life be an exhibit to the value of knowing God.”― Jim Elliot

“I couldn’t have asked for more than God in deliberate grace has surprised me with!”― Jim Elliot

I am so thankful for the various writers that have contributed to this blog over the years. Two have already gone on to heaven, A J Mithra, and April Lorier. Currently, Ian Montgomery, Dr. James J. S. Johnson, Emma Foster, Golden Eagle, and others are contributing to the blog.

Again, all of these efforts would be of no avail, if you, the reader, had not stopped by to read these articles. Thank you for all your visits over the years. We trust you will continue to stop in to see what new Birdwatching Adventures we have written about.

One of my most favorite videos was on the Eagles post, which isn’t currently working on the Fountain post, The Birds of the Bible ~ Eagles

but here it is:

“Now my days are swifter than a runner; They flee away, they see no good. They pass by like swift ships, Like an eagle swooping on its prey.” (Job 9:25-26 NKJV)

Here are some of the first Birds of the Bible articles on The Fountain:

February 2008

March 2008

April 2008

Looking through the Blog Archive [right side] on the Fountain, you will find others also.

Safely Under The Wing Of A Grebe

Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis) by Ian Montgomery

“Keep me as the apple of the eye, hide me under the shadow of thy wings,” (Psalms 17:8 KJV)

Ian’s photo of the Little Grebe with a “little” Grebe safely under the wing of its parent.

(Taken from Ian’s Bird of the Moment – Australian Grebe)

Wordless Birds

Bible Birds – Mountain Birds Part II

Bar-headed Goose (Anser indicus) by Lee LPZ

Bar-headed Goose (Anser indicus) Lowry Park Zoo by Lee

While you were reading Bible Birds – Mountain Birds in Psalm 50:11 – Part I, did you notice where the birds/fowls are? Go to the last article and scroll through the verses. See if you find the ones listed below. Did you find any that I missed?

Most of them are from the mountains. Where else are they mentioned?

They are:

  • “in the mountains”
  • “of the mountains”
  • “on the mountains”
  • “of the hills”
  • “upon the mountains”
  • “living in the fields”
  • “every mountain bird”
  • “of the air”
  • “in the sky”
  • flying over the mountains” [more on this later]
Common Cranes in Israel. Many species of crane gather in large groups during migration and on their wintering grounds

Common Cranes in Israel. Many species of crane gather in large groups during migration and on their wintering grounds

Common Crane (Grus grus) by Nikhil Devasar

Common Crane (Grus grus) by Nikhil Devasar

Whose birds are they? What did the Creator say about these birds? Do the same again, before you look at this list. See what the Creator said about the birds.

  • “I know all the birds, every bird”
  • “I know and am acquainted with all the birds”
  • “all the wild birds are mine”
  • “I keep track of every bird”
  • “I know every movement of the birds”
  • “I have known every fowl”
  • “I see all the birds”
  • “I know every mountain bird by name”

This reminds us of “Are not two sparrows sold for a copper coin? And not one of them falls to the ground apart from your Father’s will.”
(Matthew 10:29 NKJV) Do you know of any other verses that tells us about how God cares about the birds?

At the end of these verses from Psalm 50:11, what does the Word say about them?

  • “are/is mine/Mine”
  • “are Mine and are with Me, in My mind”
  • “is in my care”
  • “is with me”
  • “indeed, everything that moves… is mine”
  • “All creation and its bounty are mine…”
  • “belong to me”
  • “are at my commandment”
  • “are in my sight”
  • “is in my thoughts. The entire world and everything it contains is mine.”
White Stork (Ciconia ciconia) by Ian

White Stork (Ciconia ciconia) by Ian

WOW! 

As my pastor would say, let those words sink in. If God, the Creator, cares that much about the birds and animals, how much more does He care about us.

Psalm 50:11 refers to all the birds living in and around the mountains. One of those translations caught my attention when it mentioned the birds “flying over the mountains“. I have never heard of the VOICE translation, but this is how it reads:

Bar-headed Goose (Anser indicus) Zoo Miami by Lee

Bar-headed Goose (Anser indicus) Zoo Miami by Lee

Every bird flying over the mountains I know; every animal roaming over the fields belongs to Me.”

Yes, all the mountain birds all fly over the mountains, but the Bar-headed Goose, that we saw at the zoo, is known to fly over the “peaks of the Himalayas on their migratory path.” At an altitude of 29,000 feet/8,800 meters. But this Goose isn’t the highest flying bird.

An article from Institute for Creation Research mentions high flying birds. “What about high-flying birds that have no such oxygen mask? How can they survive elevations of 15,000 feet and sometimes higher without a supplemental source of oxygen? Many bird migrations occur at extremely high elevations: 21,000 feet for the mallard duck, 27,000 feet for swans, even 36,000 feet for vultures!The article goes on to explain about the Creators design of such birds:

“A bird’s lungs function according to the through-flow principle: the inspired [inhaled] air collects in the bird’s posterior air-sacs and flows through the lungs to the anterior air-sacs before it passes back out. In the lungs the blood is oxygenated by fine air capillaries, where air and blood flow in opposite directions. Owing to this counterflow, the oxygenated blood that leaves the bird lung acquires a higher oxygen concentration than that corresponding to the oxygen pressure in the expired [exhaled] air.

In addition to flow-through lungs, birds have hearts that are proportionately larger to their bodies than those of mammals—from 0.8 to 1.5% of total body mass, compared to mammals, which average around 0.6%. The birds’ larger hearts enable speedy blood transport and intensive oxygen renewal.”

Which is the highest flying bird? The Ruppell’s Vulture (Gyps rueppellii). One was hit by a plane at 11,300 metres (37,100 feet).

Rüppell’s Vulture (Gyps rueppellii) ©WikiC

Check out Top 10 Highest Flying Birds in the World – TMW. You might be surprised how high those birds can fly.

Do you have a tendency, at times, to just read a verse and then move on? Yet, sometimes it is good to check out some of the other translations. The last article showed photos of some of the birds that live in the mountains, but how about these that fly over the mountains. Only a Creator could design them to be able to fly that high.. Chance molecules, evolution, or whatever theory man comes up with will not explain the Wisdom that comes Only from the Lord Jesus Christ, their Creator.


High Altitude Flying For Birds – I.C.R.

List of Birds by Flight Heights – Wikipedia

Top 10 Highest Flying Birds in the World – TMW

Bible Birds

Birds of the Bible

Bible Birds – Mountain Birds in Psalm 50:11 – Part I,

Wordless Toucan

Bible Birds – Mountain Birds in Psalm 50:11 – Part I

Mountain Wheatear (Myrmecocichla monticola) ©WikiC

“I know all the birds of the mountains, And the wild beasts of the field are Mine.” (Psalm 50:11) NKJV

Hooded Mountain Tanager (Buthraupis montana) ©BirdPhotos.com

This is Part I. Shown are the many translations of Psalm 50:11. God is speaking and telling us that He knows all these birds and cares about them. How much more does God the Creator care about us?
In the next post, there will be more facts about the Birds of the Mountains.
This list of verses came from the Bible Gateway when searching for Birds of the “mountain/s”. Psalm 50:11 was one of them., this is a list of all their translations for that verse. The version links will take you to the verse in that translation.
I know all the fowls of the mountains, and the wild beasts of the field are Mine.
I know all the birds of the mountains; And the wild beasts of the field are mine.
“I know every bird of the mountains, And everything that moves in the field is Mine.
I know and am acquainted with all the birds of the mountains, and the wild animals of the field are Mine and are with Me, in My mind.

Mountain Blackeye (Chlorocharis emiliae) ©WikiC

I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
I know every bird of the mountains, and the creatures of the field are mine.
I know every mountain bird; even the insects in the fields are mine.
I know all the birds in the mountains; whatever moves in the fields is mine.

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) ©Elaine R Wilson WikiC

I know all the birds in the mountains, and every wild creature is in my care.
I know all the fowl of the mountains, and the roaming creatures of the field are mine:
I know every bird in the mountains. Everything that moves in the fields is mine.
I know every bird in the mountains, and everything that moves in the field is with me.

Mountain Bamboo Partridge (Bambusicola fytchii) by Lee Zoo Miami

I know all the birds of the hills, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the birds of the hills, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know every bird on the mountains, and every living thing in the fields is mine.
I know all the fowls on the mountains, and the wild beasts of the field are mine.

Mountain Quail (Oreortyx pictus) ©WikiC

I know every bird in the mountains. Everything that moves in the fields is mine.
All the wild birds are mine and all living things in the fields.
I know every bird of the mountains, and the creatures of the field are Mine.
I know every bird on the mountains. Every living thing in the fields is mine.

Rufous-bellied Mountain Saltator (Saltator rufiventris)©Flickr Ron Knight

I know all the birds in the mountains; indeed, everything that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the fowls of the mountains; and the wild beasts of the field are with me.
I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.

Tucuman Mountain Finch (Compsospiza baeri) ©Flickr Ron Knight

I know every bird of the mountains, and every moving creature in the field is mine.
For all the animals of field and forest are mine! The cattle on a thousand hills! And all the birds upon the mountains!
“…Every creature in the forest is mine, the wild animals on all the mountains. I know every mountain bird by name; the scampering field mice are my friends. If I get hungry, do you think I’d tell you? All creation and its bounty are mine….”
I know every bird of the mountains, and the creatures that move in the field are Mine.

Blue-winged Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus somptuosus) ©Flickr Lip Kee Yap

I know every bird in the mountains. Everything that moves in the fields is mine.
I know every bird in the heights; whatever moves in the wild is mine.
“I know every bird of the mountains, And everything that moves in the field is Mine.
I know every bird on the mountains, and every living thing in the fields is mine.

Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus igniventris) ©Flickr Joao Quental

I keep track of every bird in the hills, and the insects of the field are mine.
I own every bird in the mountains. The insects in the fields belong to me.
I know every bird in the mountains, and the insects in the fields are mine.
I know every bird in the mountains, and the insects in the fields are mine.

Mountain Tailorbird (Phyllergates cucullatus) by© Wiki

I know all the birds of the mountains, And the wild beasts of the field are Mine.
I know every bird of the mountains. And all things that move in the field are Mine.
I know every bird on the mountains, and all the animals of the field are mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
Mountain Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium gnoma) ©WikiC

Mountain Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium gnoma) ©WikiC

I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know kol oph (every bird) of the harim; and the animals of the wild are Mine.
Mountain Caracara (Phalcoboenus megalopterus) ©WikiC

Mountain Caracara (Phalcoboenus megalopterus) ©WikiC

Every animal of field and forest belongs to me, the Creator. I know every movement of the birds in the sky, and every animal of the field is in my thoughts. The entire world and everything it contains is mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know every bird of the mountains. Everything moving in the field is Mine.
Mountain Imperial-Pigeon (Ducula badia) by Ian

Mountain Imperial-Pigeon (Ducula badia) by Ian

Every bird flying over the mountains I know; every animal roaming over the fields belongs to Me.
I know all the birds of the mountains. The wild animals of the field are mine.
I have known all the volatiles of the firmament; and the fairness of the field is with me. (I know all the birds on those hills; and the wild beasts of the fields be mine.)
I have known every fowl of the mountains, And the wild beast of the field [is] with Me.

Green-crowned Brilliant and Purple-throated Mountain-Gem by Ray

Additional Psalms 50:11 verses from e-Sword versions loaded [no links]:
(ACV)  I know all the birds of the mountains, and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(AKJV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(ASV)  I know all the birds of the mountains; And the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(BBE)  I see all the birds of the mountains, and the beasts of the field are mine.
Mountain Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus nipalensis) by Peter Ericsson

Mountain Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus nipalensis) by Peter Ericsson

(Bishops)  I knowe all the foules vpon the mountaynes: and the wylde beastes of the fielde are at my commaundement.
(Brenton)  I know all the birds of the sky; and the beauty of the field is mine.
(DRB)  I know all the fowls of the air: and with me is the beauty of the field.
(ECB)  I know all the flyers of the mountains and the creatures of the field with me.
Mountain Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus sindianus) by Nikhil Devasar

Mountain Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus sindianus) by Nikhil Devasar

(Geneva)  I knowe all the foules on the mountaines: and the wilde beastes of the fielde are mine..
(HRB)  I know all the birds of the mountains; and all moving in My fields are Mine;
(IAV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(Phillips) No verse
Brandt's Mountain Finch (Leucosticte brandti) by Nikhil

Brandt’s Mountain Finch (Leucosticte brandti) by Nikhil

(LITV-TSP)  I know all the birds of the mountains; and all moving in My fields are Mine;
(JPS)  I know all the fowls of the mountains; and the wild beasts of the field are Mine.
(KJ2000)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(KJV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
White-throated Mountaingem (Lampornis castaneoventris) by Ian

White-throated Mountaingem (Lampornis castaneoventris) by Ian

(KJV-1611)  I know all the foules of the mountaines: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(KJVA)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(KJV-BRG)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(LITV)  I know all the birds of the mountains; and all moving in My fields are Mine;
Mountain Thornbill (Acanthiza katherina) by Ian

Mountain Thornbill (Acanthiza katherina) by Ian

(MKJV)  I know all the birds of the mountains; and the wild beasts of the field are Mine.
(NAS77)  “I know every bird of the mountains, And everything that moves in the field is Mine.
(RV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(The Disciple’s Bible)  I know all the birds of the mountains; And the wild beasts of the field are mine.
Plate-billed Mountain Toucan (Andigena laminirostris) by Michael Woodruff

Plate-billed Mountain Toucan (Andigena laminirostris) by Michael Woodruff

(TRC)  I know all the fowls upon the mountains, and the wild beasts of the field are in my sight.
(TS2009)  “I know all the birds of the mountains, And all moving in My field are Mine.
(UKJV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(Webster)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.

Colombian Mountain Grackle (Macroagelaius subalaris) ©WikiC

Birds of the Bible – Birds of the What??

Bible Birds

Birds of the Bible

Wordless Woodpecker

Creation Moment’s – The First Beak

The First Beak Bird – from Creations Moments

Genesis 1:20

“And God said, Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creature that hath life, and fowl that may fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven.”

Hardly a week goes by without a new news story about the supposed evolution of birds. In the week that I wrote this script, evolutionary paleontologists announced that they had discovered the world’s oldest beak. This beak was attached to a bird called ichthyornis (or fish-bird), and the fossil was actually already in the possession of Yale University. Researchers from that institution examined the fossil, which included a complete skull. One researcher said:

The fossil record provides our only direct evidence of the evolutionary transformations that have given rise to modern forms. This extraordinary new specimen reveals the surprisingly late retention of dinosaur-like features in the skull of Ichthyornis – one of the closest-known relatives of modern birds from the Age of Reptiles.

Bird Beaks from Wikipedia

One has to ask how such a skull constitutes “direct evidence of evolutionary transformations”. We do not see the beak being transformed from a dinosaur skull. Indeed, even in the popular-level articles from which this information was gleaned, we see some startling problems. For example, ichthyornis is thought to have died out 83.5 million years ago. Yet, velociraptors – a potential therapod precursor to birds – was claimed not to have appeared until 75 million years ago, about 8 million years after the creature into which it is supposed to have evolved. Even allowing for these problems with timescales, creationist researchers have noted that the evolutionary distance from ichthyornis to modern birds is less than that alleged to exist between many modern birds. One must conclude that ichthyornis has been assigned the world’s oldest beak merely because of an a priori commitment and bias to evolutionary theory.

Lord God, we see evidence of Your unique designs in all the creatures You have made. Thank You that You have made all things well. Amen.

Ref: Yale University. “Scientists find the first bird beak, right under their noses.” ScienceDaily, 2 May 2018. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180502131859.htm>. Image: CC BY-SA 4.0.

Creation Moments ©2019, used with permission


Here we go again with the evolutionary theories.

Interesting Things

Snoopy’s Partridges In Pear Tree

Partridge Snoopy

Woodstock really has his issues with trying to be a bird. Then again, Snoopy’s analysis of the adventures of Woodstock can be rather entertaining. Here is the latest from the two.

Mountain Bamboo Partridge (Bambusicola fytchii) by Lee Zoo Miami

As the partridge sitteth on eggs, and hatcheth them not; so he that getteth riches, and not by right, shall leave them in the midst of his days, and at his end shall be a fool. (Jeremiah 17:11 KJV)

Partridges are medium-sized non-migratory gamebirds, with a wide native distribution throughout the Old World, including Europe, Asia, and parts of Africa. They are sometimes grouped in the Perdicinae subfamily of the Phasianidae (pheasants, quail, etc.). However, molecular research suggests that partridges are not a distinct taxon within the family Phasianidae, but that some species are closer to the pheasants, while others are closer to the junglefowl. Partridges are also one of our Birds of the Bible. See the Bible Birds – Partridge.

Chukar Partridge (Alectoris chukar) by Ian

Chukar Partridge (Alectoris chukar) by Ian

These are medium-sized birds, intermediate between the larger pheasants and the smaller quail. Partridges are native to the grassy steppes of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Nowadays they are often found nesting on agricultural land. They nest on the ground and have a diet consisting of seeds, grapes and insects. Species such as the grey partridge and the red-legged partridge are popular as game birds, and are often reared in captivity and released for the purpose of hunting. For the same reason, they have been introduced into large areas of North America.

Stone Partridge (Ptilopachus petrosus) ©WikiC

Stone Partridge (Ptilopachus petrosus) ©WikiC

A famous reference to the partridge is in the Christmas carol, “The Twelve Days of Christmas”. The first gift listed is “a partridge in a pear tree”, and these words end each verse. Since partridges are unlikely to be seen in pear-trees (they are ground-nesting birds) it has been suggested that the text “a pear tree” is a corruption of the French “une perdrix” [a partridge]. [Wikipedia with editing]

Rock Partridge (Alectoris graeca) WikiC

Here are some of the many Partridges from around the world. Our Creator has provided many partridges around the world for us to enjoy.

Comparison of the Bald, Golden, and Steller’s Sea-eagle

Steller’s Sea Eagle (Haliaeetus pelagicus) next to Bald Eagle by Lee at National Aviary

“Wilt thou set thine eyes upon that which is not? for riches certainly make themselves wings; they fly away as an eagle toward heaven.” (Proverbs 23:5 KJV)

The last post mentioned the Golden Eagle and the Sea Eagle. We were privileged to have seen the Bald Eagle [almost daily here in Polk Country this time of the year.], the Golden Eagle, and the Steller’s Sea Eagle. Just thought you might like a size comparison. The above photo was taken at the National Aviary in Pittsburgh, PA. The two exhibits were side by side and I was overwhelmed at the size of the Steller’s Sea Eagle on the right, and the Bald Eagle on the left. I backed up so I could get them both. What a difference!

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) by Lee at National Aviary

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) by Lee at National Aviary

The Bald Eagle has a body length of 70–102 cm (28–40 in). Typical wingspan is between 1.8 and 2.3 m (5.9 and 7.5 ft) and mass is normally between 3 and 6.3 kg (6.6 and 13.9 lb).[5] Females are about 25% larger than males, averaging 5.6 kg (12 lb), and against the males’ average weight of 4.1 kg (9.0 lb)

Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) Flying ©WikiC

The Golden Eagle is a very large raptor, 66 to 102 centimetres (26 to 40 in) in length. Its wings are broad and the wingspan is 1.8 to 2.34 metres (5 ft 11 in to 7 ft 8 in). Golden eagles’ wingspan is the fifth largest among living eagle species. Females are larger than males, with a bigger difference in larger subspecies. Females of the large Himalayan golden eagles are about 37% heavier than males and have nearly 9% longer wings, whereas in the smaller Japanese golden eagles, females are only 26% heavier with around 6% longer wings.[2][8] In the largest subspecies (A. c. daphanea), males and females weigh typically 4.05 kilograms (8.9 lb) and 6.35 kg (14.0 lb), respectively. In the smallest subspecies, A. c. japonica, males weigh 2.5 kg (5.5 lb) and females 3.25 kg (7.2 lb).[2] In the species overall, males average around 3.6 kg (7.9 lb) and females around 5.1 kg (11 lb). The maximum size of golden eagles debated. Large subspecies are the heaviest representatives of the Aquila genus and this species is on average the seventh-heaviest living eagle species. The golden eagle is the second heaviest breeding eagle in North America, Europe and Africa and the fourth heaviest in Asia. For some time, the largest known mass authenticated for a wild female was the specimen from the A. c. chrysaetos subspecies which weighed around 6.7 kg (15 lb) and spanned 2.55 m (8 ft 4 in) across the wings.[10] American golden eagles are typically somewhat smaller than the large Eurasian species,

Steller’s Sea Eagle (Haliaeetus pelagicus) by Lee at National Aviary

Steller’s Sea Eagle (Haliaeetus pelagicus) Feet by Lee at National Aviary

Steller’s Sea Eagle is the largest bird in the genus Haliaeetus and is one of the largest raptors overall. Females vary in weight from 6,195 to 9,500 g (13.658 to 20.944 lb), while males being rather lighter with a weight range of 4,900 to 6,800 g (10.8 to 15.0 lb). The average weight is variable, possibly due to seasonal variation in food access or general condition of eagles, but has been reported as high as a mean mass of 7,757 g (17.101 lb) to a median estimate weight of 6,250 g (13.78 lb)… [Above from Wikipedia, with editing.]

Steller’s Sea-eagle at San Diego Zoo 2015 by Lee

*

Golden Eagles in Scotland – YouTube

Bible Birds – Eagles

YouTube – Scotland’s Golden Eagles

Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) - Grandfather Eagle by PastorBBC

Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) – Grandfather Eagle by PastorBBC

“Doth the eagle mount up at thy command, and make her nest on high?” (Job 39:27 KJV)

I love watching Eagles. This video adds some views from the back of an Eagle. Worth watching.

The way of an eagle in the air;…” (Proverbs 30:19a KJV)

Bible Birds – Hawk Introduction

Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) by Dan (closeup)

“Does the hawk fly by your wisdom, And spread its wings toward the south? (Job 39:26 NKJV)

According to the King James Version of Scripture, the other two verses with hawk in them are:

“the ostrich, the short-eared owl, the sea gull, and the hawk after its kind;” (Leviticus 11:16 NKJV)

“the ostrich, the short-eared owl, the sea gull, and the hawk after their kinds;” (Deuteronomy 14:15 NKJV)

For more advanced reading, you can check out Birds of the Bible – Clean vs. Unclean,  Birds of the Bible – The Law Of The Birds and Deuteronomy 14:11-18 Visualized on Leesbird.com

What is a Hawk? To what Family of birds does it belong?

Harris Hawk in Training at National Aviary

Harris Hawk in Training at National Aviary

Hawks are one of God’s Created Avian Wonders. The bird family of Hawks, Accipitridae, not only includes Hawks, but also Eagles, Kites, Harriers, Vultures, plus more. The Lord has given them great eyesight, hearing, and speed.

Hawks have excellent eyesight. They can see up to 8 times more clearly than the sharpest human eye. Eyesight is primarily used for hunting.

Their hearing is acute, but their sense of smell is poor.

Hawk species are known for their speed, particularly when chasing prey. During the hunt, some species of hawks can dive 240 kilometers (150 miles) per hour through the air. [Just Fun Facts]

“All hawks are almost exactly the same structurally as all other birds, and the distinguishing features that set them apart from all of the other hawks are minute. Hawks are distinguished from all other birds, especially falcons, by their broader, more rounded wings. They also have sharp, curved, hooked bills, strong feet with curved talons, and amazing sight capabilities. All hawks have uniform 20/2 vision, exactly 8 times better than a human with good eyesight! Almost all male hawks are smaller than females.” Hawks – CreationWiki [with editing]

Great Black Hawk (Buteogallus urubitinga) ©WikiC

Great Black Hawk (Buteogallus urubitinga) ©WikiC

Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus) ©USFWS

Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus) ©USFWS

Short-tailed Hawk (Buteo brachyurus) ©WikiC

Short-tailed Hawk (Buteo brachyurus) ©WikiC

Hawks are in the Accipitridae Family of Kites, Hawks & Eagles and you can read more about them in the Birds of the Bible – Hawk section.
Hawks have claws which are used for catching their prey. Beware of these:

Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) talons by Beedie

  • A Cooper’s Hawk captures a bird with its feet and kills it by repeated squeezing. Falcons tend to kill their prey by biting it, but Cooper’s Hawks hold their catch away from the body until it dies. [Cool Fact from All about Birds]

Hawks and the other birds in this family did not always prey (catch) other living critters. Because of sin, these avian creations from the Lord, were placed under God’s curse. One day, when that curse is removed, the birds of prey will become birds of play [with others.]

Check out All About Birds – Hawks and Falcons

See also:

Accipitriformes – Order, Accipitridae – Family (Kites, Hawks & Eagles)

ABC’s of the Gospel