Christmas Hymns With Birds – Christmas Brings Joy To Every Heart

Long-tailed Broadbill (Psarisomus dalhousiae) babies ©©coracii

Long-tailed Broadbill (Psarisomus dalhousiae) babies ©©coracii

Rejoice in the Lord always. Again I will say, rejoice! (Philippians 4:4 NKJV)

Birds in Christmas Hymns

Birds in Christmas Hymns

Words by Bern­hardt S. In­ge­mann (1789-1862), 1840 (Julen har bragt velsignet bud); trans­lat­ed from Dan­ish to Eng­lish by Ce­cil Cow­drey.

Music: Christ­mas Brings Joy, Christ­oph E. Weyse (1774-1842), 1841

Christmas Brings Joy To Every Heart

Christmas brings joy to every heart,
Sets old and young rejoicing,
What angels sang once to all on earth,
Oh, hear the children voicing.
Bright is the tree with lights aglow,
Like birds that perch together,
The child that holdeth Christmas dear
Shall keep these joys forever.

Joy comes to the all the world today,
To halls and cottage hasting,
Come, sparrow and dove, from roof tree tall,
And share our Christmas feasting.
Dance, little child, on mother’s knee,
The lovely day is dawning,
The road to paradise is found
The blessèd Christmas morning.

Once to this earth our Savior came,
An infant poor and lowly,
To open for us those gardens fair
Where dwell His angels holy.
Christmas joy He bringeth us,
The Christ child King of heaven,
“To every little child,” He saith,
“Shall angel wings be given.”

Emerald Dove by Birdway

Most information from The Cyber Hymnal

See ~ Christmas Gospel Presentation

More ~ Birds in Hymns

*

Inside A Birdhouse

Thought you might enjoy seeing “Inside A Birdhouse”

A friend sent me a link to this commercial. Couldn’t resist.

Keep an eye out for the Human Clock.

A happy heart is good medicine and a cheerful mind works healing, but a broken spirit dries up the bones. (Proverbs 17:22 AMP)

(A fruit drink called Squash)

*

Birds of the Bible – Prayer

Sandhill Cranes with "Colts"

Sandhill Cranes with “Colts”

“Ah, Soul, God does listen to the chattering of cranes! I know He does, for I have read in His Word what is tantamount to that in the text [Isaiah 38:14],

Like a crane or a swallow, so did I chatter: I did mourn as a dove: mine eyes fail with looking upward: O LORD, I am oppressed; undertake for me. (Isaiah 38:14 KJV)

Northern Raven (Corvus corax) by Kent Nickell

Northern Raven (Corvus corax) by Kent Nickell

“He hears the young ravens when they cry.”

And surely if He hears a raven’s cry and if not a sparrow falls to the ground without our Father, your prayer, though it may be very indistinct and the language, itself, may be very unworthy of the Divine ear, yet it shall command an audience and will bring down a blessing from above!”

American Tree Sparrow (Spizella arborea) w chicks ©USFWS

American Tree Sparrow (Spizella arborea) w chicks ©USFWS

Above is a quote from C. H. Spurgeon’s Notable Quotes: —Volume 61, Sermon #3468

 Give ear to my words, O LORD, consider my meditation. Hearken unto the voice of my cry, my King, and my God: for unto thee will I pray. My voice shalt thou hear in the morning, O LORD; in the morning will I direct my prayer unto thee, and will look up. (Psalms 5:1-3 KJV)

See all the:

Birds of the Bible

*

Birds of the Bible – Smith’s Sparrow

Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) by J Fenton

Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) by J Fenton

While looking up the word “birds” in the Dictionary section of my e-Sword program, there is an “i” symbol that shows on the tab of the name of a dictionary. That “i” indicates that there is information about your search word. The Smith’s Bible Dictionary had an “i” so I investigated it. This is what I saw:

Birds
        Birds. See Sparrow.

So when I went there, this interesting definition of “sparrow” was found and I wanted to share it with you.

Eurasian Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs) by Ian

Eurasian Chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs) by Ian

Sparrow

Sparrow. (Hebrew, tzippor, from a root signifying to “chirp” or “twitter”, which appears to be a phonetic representation of the call-note of any passerine (sparrow-like) bird). This Hebrew word occurs upwards of forty times in the Old Testament. In all passages, except two, it is rendered by the Authorized Version indifferently as “bird” or “fowl,” and denotes any small bird, both of the sparrow-like species and such as the starling, chaffinch, greenfinch, linnet, goldfinch, corn-bunting, pipits, blackbird, song-thrush, etc. In Psalm 84:3, and Psalm 102:7, it is rendered “sparrow.”

Corn Bunting (Emberiza calandra) ©WikiC

Corn Bunting (Emberiza calandra) ©WikiC

Yea, the sparrow hath found an house, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, even thine altars, O LORD of hosts, my King, and my God. (Psalms 84:3 KJV)

I watch, and am as a sparrow alone upon the house top. (Psalms 102:7 KJV)

Anyone for a Sparrow Snack?

The Greek, stauthion, (Authorized Version, “sparrow”), occurs twice in the New Testament, Matthew 10:29; Luke 12:6-7. (The birds above mentioned are found in great numbers in Palestine, and are of very little value, selling for the merest trifle, and are, thus, strikingly used by our Saviour, Matthew 10:20, as an illustration of our Father’s care for his children. — Editor).

Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father. (Matthew 10:29 KJV)

Are not five sparrows sold for two farthings, and not one of them is forgotten before God? But even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Fear not therefore: ye are of more value than many sparrows. (Luke 12:6-7 KJV)

Blue Rock Thrush (Monticola solitarius) by Nikhil Devasar

Blue Rock Thrush (Monticola solitarius) by Nikhil Devasar

The blue thrush, (Petrocossyphus cyaneus), is probably the bird to which the psalmist alludes in Psa_102:7, as “the sparrow that sitteth alone upon the house-top.” It is a solitary bird, eschewing the society of its own species, and rarely more than a pair are seen together. The English tree-sparrow, (Passer montanus), is also very common, and may be seen in numbers on Mount Olivet, and also about the sacred enclosure of the mosque of Omar. This is, perhaps, the exact species referred to in Psalm 84:3.

Yea, the sparrow hath found an house, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, even thine altars, O LORD of hosts, my King, and my God. (Psalms 84:3 KJV)

House Sparrows visiting National Aviary Parrot Show by Lee

House Sparrows visiting NA Parrot Show Outside

Dr. Thompson, in speaking of the great numbers of the house-sparrows and field-sparrows in troublesome and impertinent generation, and nestle just where you do not want them. “They stop your stove — and water-pipes with their rubbish, build in the windows and under the beams of the roof, and would stuff your hat full of stubble in half a day, if they found it hanging in a place to suit them.”

(I added the verses to make it easier and also the “blue thrush, (Petrocossyphus cyaneus)” could not be found. Photos also inserted.)

The Blue Rock Thrush (Monticola solitarius) is a species of chat. This thrush-like Old World flycatcher was formerly placed in the family Turdidae. It is now found in the Muscicapidae family.

Sparrows are found in two families today. The Family – Emberizidae – Buntings, New World Sparrows & Allies and the Family – Passeridae – Old World Sparrows, Snowfinches.

*

Smith’s Bible Dictionary, originally named A Dictionary of the Bible, was a 19th century Bible dictionary containing upwards of four thousand entries that became named after its editor, William Smith. Its popularity was such that condensed dictionaries appropriated the title, “Smith’s Bible Dictionary”.

The original dictionary was published as a three volume set in 1863, in London and Boston, USA. This first edition was followed in 1893 by an expanded four volume version which was published in the United States as A dictionary of the Bible comprising its antiquities, biography, geography, and natural history, edited by Smith and J. M. Fuller.

The original publications are now in the public domain; some derivative, commercial versions are still in copyright.

*