Scarlet-plus Birds

Scarlet-chested Sunbird (Chalcomitra senegalensis) ©WikiC

“Come now, and let us reason together, saith the LORD: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool.” (Isaiah 1:18 KJV)

“They shall spread over them a scarlet cloth, …” (Numbers 4:8a NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Scarlet II

Scarlet
This dye was obtained by the Egyptians from the shell-fish Carthamus tinctorius; and by the Hebrews from the Coccus ilicis, an insect which infests oak trees, called kermes by the Arabians.
This colour was early known (Gen_38:28). It was one of the colours of the ephod (Exo_28:6), the girdle (Exo_28:8), and the breastplate (Exo_28:15) of the high priest. It is also mentioned in various other connections (Jos_2:18; 2Sa_1:24; Lam_4:5; Nah_2:3). A scarlet robe was in mockery placed on our Lord (Mat_27:28; Luk_23:11). “Sins as scarlet” (Isa_1:18), i.e., as scarlet robes “glaring and habitual.” Scarlet and crimson were the firmest of dyes, and thus not easily washed out. [Easton’s Bible Dictionary]

Crimson, red, purple, and scarlet:
Used in the symbolisms of the tabernacle furnishings and priestly vestments and functions, as types and shadows of the atonement. ]Nave’s Topical Bible]


There are so many birds whose names begin with “Scarlet-“, that I decided to do a Part II. I want to show more of God’s Handiwork in the Avian Creations. These are by far not all of them.

Scarlet-and-white Tanager (Chrysothlypis salmoni) ©WikiC

Scarlet-browed Tanager (Heterospingus xanthopygius) ©WikiC

Scarlet-browed Tanager (Heterospingus xanthopygius) ©WikiC

Scarlet-browed Tanager (Heterospingus xanthopygius) ©WikiC

Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus igniventris) ©Flickr Joao Quental

Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus igniventris) ©Flickr vll.sandl

Scarlet-rumped Cacique (Cacicus microrhynchus) ©WikiC

Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum cruentatum) ©Flickr Dave Curtis

The scarlet-throated Frigate bird, Galapagos islands, EcuadorFrom Pinterest

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-horned Manakin (Ceratopipra cornuta) ©©Flickr JerryOldenettel

Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum cruentatum) by ©Wiki

Scarlet-headed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum trochileum) by© Wiki

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©©LipKee

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©©LipKee

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©WikiC

Scarlet-rumped Trogon (Harpactes duvaucelii) ©WikiC

Scarlet-headed Blackbird (Amblyramphus holosericeus) by Lee

Scarlet-headed Blackbird asleep by Lee

Scarlet-headed Blackbird by Dan

Scarlet-headed Blackbird (Amblyramphus holosericeus) by Dan


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

Wordless Birds

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Scarlet Birds

Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) by Dario Sanches

Scarlet Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) by Dario Sanches

She is not afraid of snow for her household, For all her household is clothed with scarlet. (Proverbs 31:21 NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Scarlet

SC’ARLET, n.
1. A beautiful bright red color, brighter than crimson.
2. Cloth of a scarlet color.
All her household are clothed with scarlet. Prov 31.
SC’ARLET, a. of the color called scarlet; of a bright red color; as a scarlet cloth or thread; a scarlet lip.


Scarlet Birds

Scarlet Finch

Scarlet Finch (Haematospiza sipahi) by Nikhil Devasar

Scarlet Finch (Haematospiza sipahi) by Nikhil Devasar

Scarlet Flycatcher

Scarlet Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) by Dario Sanches

Scarlet Ibis

Scarlet Ibis (Eudocimus ruber) ©whm.ac.uk

Scarlet Macaw

Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao) by Lee at Brevard Zoo

Scarlet Macaw (Ara macao) by Lee at Brevard Zoo

Scarlet Minivet

Scarlet Minivet (Pericrocotus speciosus) by Ian

Scarlet Myzomela

Scarlet Honeyeater or Myzolema (Myzomela sanguinolenta) by Tom Tarrant

Scarlet Robin

Scarlet Robin (Petroica boodang) by Ian

Scarlet Robin (Petroica boodang) by Ian

Scarlet Tanager

Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) by Kent Nickell

Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) by Kent Nickell

“And they stripped Him and put a scarlet robe on Him. When they had twisted a crown of thorns, they put it on His head, and a reed in His right hand. And they bowed the knee before Him and mocked Him, saying, “Hail, King of the Jews!” (Matthew 27:28-29 NKJV)


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “S”

Wordless Toucan

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Tangled Up Owls

Here are a couple of videos of two Owls in trouble. It is amazing to watch how they react to the people trying to free them.

The first one is trapped in fishing line.

This Great Horned Owl is caught in a Soccer Net.

Not sure if these owls prayed, but I know these verses are good for us when we are “in a pickle.”

“But You, O LORD, do not be far from Me; O My Strength, hasten to help Me!” (Psalms 22:19 NKJV)

“Behold, the eye of the LORD is on those who fear Him, On those who hope in His mercy, To deliver their soul from death, And to keep them alive in famine. Our soul waits for the LORD; He is our help and our shield. For our heart shall rejoice in Him, Because we have trusted in His holy name. Let Your mercy, O LORD, be upon us, Just as we hope in You.” n(Psalms 33:18-22 NKJV)

 

Clark’s Nutcracker’s Fantastic Memory

Clark’s Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) ©USFWS

Some trust in chariots, and some in horses; But we will remember the name of the LORD our God. (Psalms 20:7 NKJV)

How many of you have a good memory? A great memory? How about the memory of the Clark’s Nutcracker? “The Clark’s nutcracker, a bird that can hide as many as 30,000 seeds over dozens of square miles and remember where it put them several months later;” [quote from Jennifer Ackerman’s book, The Genius of Birds]

Clark’s Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) by Ian

“All year round, the staple food of a Clark Nutcracker’s diet is pine seeds, either fresh or stored. The nutcracker uses its long, sharp, sturdy bill to crack open closed, unripe pine cones and remove seeds from the cone scales. It shells seeds by cracking them in its bill or by holding them in its feet and hammering them. Between September and December it stores seeds to eat later, placing 30–150 seeds in the pouch under its tongue and carrying them to a spot nearby or up to 15 miles away.”

Clark’s Nutcracker – Notice the throat pouch ©WikiC

Remember His marvelous works which He has done, His wonders, and the judgments of His mouth, (Psalms 105:5 NKJV)

“It digs a trench in the soil with its bill and puts a cluster of seeds inside before covering them up again, or it pushes individual seeds into gravelly soil, pumice, or crevices in wood. During the winter and spring, it relocates caches by remembering where they lie in relation to nearby objects like rocks, logs, and trees. Nutcrackers have such good memories that they can relocate seeds more than nine months after caching them, though their accuracy declines after about six months. They don’t recover all the seeds they bury, and it’s estimated that for some high-elevation pines, such as whitebark pine, virtually all the trees you can see on the landscape come from seeds planted by a nutcracker.” [All About Birds, Clark’s Nutcracker]

Clark’s Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) by Ian

I will remember the works of the LORD; Surely I will remember Your wonders of old. I will also meditate on all Your work, And talk of Your deeds. (Psalms 77:11-12 NKJV)

Clark’s Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) ©WikiC

Interesting Fact:

  • Ounce for ounce, the whitebark pine seeds that many Clark’s Nutcrackers depend on have more calories than chocolate.

Clark’s Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) ©WikiC

See for more information about this amazing creation from the Lord:

Clark’s Nutcracker – All About Birds

Wordless Birds

Bible Birds – Immature Cormorant

Drying off

The Cormorant is a bird mentioned four times in the Bible. You can read about them in Bible Birds – Cormorant and Birds of the Bible – Cormorants.

“And the little owl, and the cormorant, and the great owl,” (Leviticus 11:17 KJV)

Today, I would like too share some photos of an immature Cormorant who seemed to have become to wet to fly back to land to dry off. It sort of swam to shore and then dried its wings. An experienced Cormorant wouldn’t have waited so long to head to shore.

When we are young, sometimes we forget what we were told, and then find ourselves in trouble.

“Hear my words, O ye wise men; and give ear unto me, ye that have knowledge.” (Job 34:2 KJV)

Looking for dry land

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Double-crested Cormorant wading in to shore

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Yeah! I made it! Double-crested Cormorant by Angie at beach

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Double-crested Cormorant by Angie at beach

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Drying off

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Not even concerned about the people nearby

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Double-crested Cormorant starting to feel better – by Angie at beach

Teach me good judgment and knowledge, For I believe Your commandments.” (Psalms 119:66 NKJV)

Bible Birds – Cormorant

Birds of the Bible – Cormorants

Wordless Birds

After Eden – Reason For The Ark


(12) So God looked upon the earth, and indeed it was corrupt; for all flesh had corrupted their way on the earth.

(13) And God said to Noah, “The end of all flesh has come before Me, for the earth is filled with violence through them; and behold, I will destroy them with the earth.

(14) Make yourself an ark of gopherwood; make rooms in the ark, and cover it inside and outside with pitch.

Ernesto Carrasco’s Noah’s Ark Model

(15) And this is how you shall make it: The length of the ark shall be three hundred cubits, its width fifty cubits, and its height thirty cubits.

(16) You shall make a window for the ark, and you shall finish it to a cubit from above; and set the door of the ark in its side. You shall make it with lower, second, and third decks.

(17) And behold, I Myself am bringing floodwaters on the earth, to destroy from under heaven all flesh in which is the breath of life; everything that is on the earth shall die.

(18) But I will establish My covenant with you; and you shall go into the ark—you, your sons, your wife, and your sons’ wives with you.

(19) And of every living thing of all flesh you shall bring two of every sort into the ark, to keep them alive with you; they shall be male and female.

(20) Of the birds after their kind, of animals after their kind, and of every creeping thing of the earth after its kind, two of every kind will come to you to keep them alive.

(21) And you shall take for yourself of all food that is eaten, and you shall gather it to yourself; and it shall be food for you and for them.”

(22) Thus Noah did; according to all that God commanded him, so he did. (Genesis 6:12-22 NKJV)

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Wordless Birds

 

EVOLUTION OF NEW SPECIES? – Creation Moments

Large Cactus Finch (Geospiza conirostris) by ©Wiki -Espanola_Island, Galapagos, Ecuador

“And God created great whales, and every living creature that moveth, which the waters brought forth abundantly, after their kind, and every winged fowl after his kind: and God saw that it was good.” (Genesis 1:21)

Femal resident Finch from Daphne

It was Charles Darwin’s assumption that new species arose from previous ones by a process of natural selection. Darwin famously illustrated this point by reference to the various species of finch living on the Galapagos Islands.

Darwin’s finches recently received a new airing when a study about a new finch species appearing on the island of Daphne Major was published. Prior to the study, the island had three species of finch. A new bird was observed, which was larger than members of the existing species. Later genetic testing indicated that the bird had come from Española island, 62 miles to the southeast. Because this new bird had no other member of its species with which to mate, it mated with a bird from one of the existing species. The offspring of this so-called “Big Bird Lineage” was followed for six generations. After only two generations, sufficient changes were seen for a new species to be defined. A popular science website comments on these reports, stating, “The majority of these lineages have gone extinct but some may have led to the evolution of contemporary species.”

The problem is that the word evolution is here describing the change of species within an animal kind. This is not what we really mean by evolution when we expect to see new genetic information formed. What we have actually seen is finches changing into finches. Such variations within a kind are normal and biblically expected. This is not genuine Darwinian evolution.

Prayer:
Thank You, Lord, that Your word is true and that all that we study in science makes sense in the light of Your word. Amen.
Notes:
Ref: Princeton University. (2017, November 24). New species can develop in as little as two generations, Galapagos study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 25, 2017, from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/11/171124084320.htm.
Image: Female resident finch from Daphne Major, License: Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 3.0 Unported.

What’s For Breakfast?

Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) at Nest by Anthony747

Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) at Nest by Anthony747

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Family Circus - Taking Orders

Family Circus – Taking Orders

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Grey Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) Feeding at Nest WikiC

Grey Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) Feeding at Nest WikiC

“Consider the ravens [birds], for they neither sow nor reap, which have neither storehouse nor barn; and God feeds them. Of how much more value are you than the birds?” (Luke 12:24 NKJV)

Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea) at nest ©L Walkinshaw

“I know all the birds of the mountains, And the wild beasts of the field are Mine.” (Psalms 50:11 NKJV)

Wordless Woodpecker

Bible Birds – Sandhill Cranes In The Yard

Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) in Sideyard May 1, 2015, by Lee

Like a crane or a swallow, so I chattered; I mourned like a dove; My eyes fail from looking upward. O LORD, I am oppressed; Undertake for me! (Isaiah 38:14 NKJV)

Sandhill Crane “Colts” Taken across the street in our community pond.

Over the years we have lived here in Central Florida, we have been visited by Sandhill Cranes and their little ones. They are called “colts” when they are young. The ones in the above picture would be considered “juveniles.”

Leaving

It is enjoyable to watch them mature and eventually become red on the top.

Sandhill Cranes in Sideyard 5-1-15 by Lee

We are not “technically” supposed to feed them, but yet we can feed all the other birds. So how do you keep them out of your feeders. Hide them? No. The Lord made all of His creatures and promised to see that they are fed.

Oh, My, The feeder is down.

My flat feeders hang about 18 inches above the ground and Sandhill Cranes [adults] stand about:

SIZE: Body, 31.5 to 47.2 in; wingspan, 5 to 6 ft”

WEIGHT: 6.5 to 14 lbs

AVERAGE LIFE SPAN IN THE WILD: 20 years (Natl Geo)

Sandhill Cranes with Youngsters 4-26-16

See More:

ABC’s of the Gospel

God’s Recipe for the Bar-tailed Godwit

Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica) by Nikhil Devasar

God’s Recipe for the Bar-tailed Godwit

Family Circus – God’s good recipe

“Doth the hawk [Bar-tailed Godwit] fly by thy wisdom, and stretch her wings toward the south?” (Job 39:26 KJV)

The Bar-tailed Godwit was tracked by a tiny transmitter they attached to her. She flew “nonstop for 7,257 miles (11,679 km) from western Alaska to New Zealand.”

Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica) by MAMuin

“What’s more, the bird probably didn’t even glideBar-tailed godwits use forward flapping for flight and “seldom” glide, according to Robert Gill, Jr., lead author of the study.”

As for the humble godwit, its incredible journey and endurance is a fantastic testimony to the Creator’s design in the animal kingdom.

Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica) ©USFWS

This is the LORD’S doing; it is marvellous in our eyes.” (Psalms 118:23 KJV)


All quotes from Bird Sets Nonstop Flight Record at 7,257 miles

Answers in Genesis

Bar-tailed Godwit – Audubon

Bar-tailed Godwit – Wikipedia

God’s Recipe for the Fiery-throated Hummingbird

Fiery-throated Hummingbird (Panterpe insignis) ©WikiC

The Fiery-throated Hummingbird (Panterpe insignis) is a medium-sized hummingbird which breeds only in the mountains of Costa Rica and western Panama. It is the only member of the genus Panterpe.

This is a common to abundant bird of montane forest canopy above 1400 m, and also occurs in scrub at the woodland edges and clearings.

This bird is 11 cm long and weighs 5.7 g. It has a straight black bill and dusky feet.

Fiery-throated Hummingbird (Panterpe insignis) by Judd Patterson

Fiery-throated Hummingbird (Panterpe insignis) by Judd Patterson

The adult fiery-throated hummingbird has shiny green body plumage, a blue tail, and a white spot behind the eye. It often looks dark, but when the light catches it at the right angle, it shows a brilliant blue crown, yellow-bordered bright orange throat, and violet-blue chest patch. The sexes are similar, but young birds have rufous fringes to the head plumage. The call is a high-pitched twittering.

Fiery-throated Hummingbird in Flight ©Raymond Barlow

The female fiery-throated hummingbird is entirely responsible for nest building and incubation. She lays two white eggs in a bulky plant-fibre cup nest 2–4 m high at the end of a descending bamboo stem or on a rootlet under a bank. Incubation takes 15–19 days, and fledging another 20-26.

Fiery-throated Hummingbird (Panterpe insignis) Little color from side ©WikiC

The food of this species is nectar, taken from a variety of small flowers, including epiphytic Ericaceae and bromeliads. Like other hummingbirds it also takes small insects as an essential source of protein. Male fiery-throated hummingbirds defend flowers and scrubs in their feeding territories, and are dominant over most other hummingbirds. They will, however, allow females to share their food resources.

“In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.” (Genesis 1:1 KJV)

God’s Good Recipe For Birds

The Family Circus Artist surely came up with a great truth in this one. God’s “recipe” was Creation. His [God’s] wisdom is evident in all of his creation, especially the birds.

“For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.” (Romans 8:22 NASB)

What would this beautiful Fiery-throated Hummer look like if it weren’t under the curse of man’s sin?


Fiery-throated Hummingbird Panterpe insignis – Internet Bird Collection

Fiery-throated Hummingbird – Wikipedia

Fiery-throated Hummingbird – Neotropical Birds

 

 

Bible Birds – Ibis Introduction

Scarlet Ibis (Eudocimus ruber) by Lee

“and for a long time birds and hedgehogs, and ibises and ravens shall dwell in it: and the measuring line of desolation shall be cast over it, and satyrs shall dwell in it.” (Isaiah 34:11 Brenton)

Many of the birds in the Bible are listed differently in some versions. The Ibises is only listed in this verse in the Brenton, DRB, and the ABP versions. Most of the different versions list Pelicans, Cormorants, Bitterns, Heron, and Storks. The Pelicans, Cormorants, Bitterns, and Heron are all found in the PELECANIFORMES Order of birds. The Storks are in the close CICONIIFORMES Order.

All of these birds enjoy similar surroundings and the Ibises and Spoonbills make up the Threskiornithidae Family.
The ibises (collective plural ibis; classical plurals ibides and ibes) are a group of long-legged wading birds, that inhabit wetlands, forests and plains. “Ibis” derives from the Latin and Ancient Greek word for this group of birds. It also occurs in the scientific name of the cattle egret, (Bubulcus ibis), mistakenly identified in 1757 as being the sacred ibis.

American White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) 1st Birds of 2014 by Lee

American White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) 1st Birds of 2014 by Lee (In our yard)

Ibises all have long, down-curved bills, and usually feed as a group, probing mud for food items, usually crustaceans. They are monogamous and highly territorial while nesting and feeding. Most nest in trees, often with spoonbills or herons. The word ibis comes from Latin ibis from Greek ἶβις ibis from Egyptian hb, hīb.

Here is a list of the current living Ibises.
African Sacred Ibis

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Bible Birds – Ibis

Bible Birds

Birds of the Bible – Ibises

Threskiornithidae Family