Artistic Birds From Their Creator II

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor) Male ©WikiC

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor) Male ©WikiC

Bezalel was given much wisdom and understanding to help in the construction of the Tabernacle. He then was given the ability to train others to help. They were given abilities to help do the work also. Today, as Christians, we each are given talents and gifts to help in building the Church. Are we using those abilities?

“and He has filled him [Bezalel] with the Spirit of God, in wisdom and understanding, in knowledge and all manner of workmanship, to design artistic works, to work in gold and silver and bronze, in cutting jewels for setting, in carving wood, and to work in all manner of artistic workmanship. “And He has put in his heart the ability to teach, in him and Aholiab the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan. He has filled them with skill to do all manner of work of the engraver and the designer and the tapestry maker, in blue, purple, and scarlet thread, and fine linen, and of the weaver—those who do every work and those who design artistic works.” (Exodus 35:31-35 NKJV)

When the Lord created the birds, He especially used His Ultimate Creative Ability. As mentioned in the Introduction to this new series, Artistic Work In Birds, we will looking for those birds which seem to have been painted/designed with great markings and other characteristics.

Frigatebirds

Frigatebirds (also listed as “frigate bird”, “frigate-bird”, “frigate”, “frigate-petrel”) are a family of seabirds called Fregatidae which are found across all tropical and subtropical oceans. The five extant species are classified in a single genus, Fregata. All have predominantly black plumage, long, deeply forked tails and long hooked bills. Females have white underbellies and males have a distinctive red gular pouch, which they inflate during the breeding season to attract females. Their wings are long and pointed and can span up to 2.3 metres (7.5 ft), the largest wing area to body weight ratio of any bird.

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor palmerstoni) Female by Ian

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor palmerstoni) Female by Ian

Able to soar for weeks on wind currents, frigatebirds spend most of the day in flight hunting for food, and roost on trees or cliffs at night. Their main prey are fish and squid, caught when chased to the water surface by large predators such as tuna.

Now that is design and engineering! The Great and Magnificent Frigatebirds have a distinctive red gular pouch, and it had a few paint strokes added to make it more attractive. [I guess]

Great Frigatebird (Fregata minor) Male Displaying ©WikiC

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©WikiC

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©WikiC

Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) ©WikiC

Starting off with a simple bird, also, will be working way through the birds sort of in Taxonomic order.

Frigatebirds – Wikipedia

Artistic Birds From Their Creator – Introduction

Wordless Birds

Concern For The Birds Of The Bahamas

Bahama Yellowthroat (Geothlypis rostrata) ©WikiC

Bahama Yellowthroat (Geothlypis rostrata) ©WikiC

As you know, over the Labor Day week-end and beyond, hurricane Dorian “parked” over the Bahamas. Many people have lost their lives and the count will take quite a while to access the true count of lost lives.

BirdWatching has an article that tells about the “grave concern” for the birds in those islands. I thought you might find this article very sad and concerning also. It is worth reading.

After Dorian “Grave Concern” Birds of Northern Bahamas

Bananaquit (Coereba flaveola) by Raymond Barlow

Bananaquit (Coereba flaveola) by Raymond Barlow

“I know every bird of the mountains, And everything that moves in the field is Mine.” (Psalms 50:11 NASB)

The Lord is in control of these hurricanes, and because of the curse, things like this happen. When the earth is renewed, things like this will not happen.

Our hearts go out to those who have lost family members, or were spared, but lost everything. We have church members whose families in the Bahamas were spared, but 70% of them lost all.

“Trust in the LORD with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths. Be not wise in thine own eyes: fear the LORD, and depart from evil.” (Proverbs 3:5-7 KJV)

Artistic Birds From Their Creator I

MaCaw by Dan at Gatorland

MaCaw by Dan at Gatorland

[Due to hurricane Dorian and an unexpected event, we have been busy/occupied. This is going to continue for awhile. So, here is the first of a series of articles from over on the Lee’s Birdwatching Adventure’s Blog, that will also be shared here.]

While reading through the New King James Bible in Exodus, the word “Artistic” works and “Artist” designs appears thirteen times. In the King James Version, this word is translated “Cunning” or “Curious.” Other versions; NASB uses “skillful”and “inventive”; the ESV uses “skillfully or skilled” “artistic”; the AMP uses “skillfully or skilled” and “artistic designs.”

The verses are all referring to preparing the tabernacle. Many people gave supplies that were needed, but God gave those that were actually putting it together, special wisdom and gifts/talent to accomplish the different task.

“And God has put in Bezalel’s heart that he may teach, both he and Aholiab son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan. He has filled them with wisdom of heart and ability to do all manner of craftsmanship, of the engraver, of the skillful workman, of the embroiderer in blue, purple, and scarlet [stuff] and in fine linen, and of the weaver, even of those who do or design any skilled work.” (Exodus 35:34-35 AMP)

As I read these passages:

Exodus 28:25, 31:4, 35:32, 35:33, 35:35, 36:8, 36:35, 39:3, 39:8, 39:27,

the birds and their fantastic designs came to mind. How many birds that I have seen personally, or photos of that look like they were artistically designed? Many of them fascinate me. It looks like the Lord, in His Creation of these avian wonders, used a paintbrush as the colors and designs were added to the birds. I am sure a few also come to your memory also.

My first thought was of the Blue Jays that come to our yard frequently.

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) by Daves BirdingPix

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) by Daves BirdingPix

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) ©Flickr Stan Lupo

That is just a start. I would consider the Blue Jay “artistically designed. Wouldn’t You? How about that MaCaw?

Stay Tuned as a search through the Birds of the World seeks to see “Artistically” designed birds.

Birds of the World

Wordless Birds

Bible Birds – Falcon

Peregrine Falcon by Ray

Peregrine Falcon by Ray

“And these you shall regard as an abomination among the birds; they shall not be eaten, they are an abomination: the eagle, the vulture, the buzzard, the kite, and the falcon after its kind;” (Leviticus 11:13-14 NKJV)

The Falcon is mentioned in three verses in the New King James Version of the Bible. Leviticus 11:14; [above]; “the red kite, the falcon, and the kite after their kinds;” (Deuteronomy 14:13 NKJV); and “That path no bird knows, Nor has the falcon’s eye seen it.” (Job 28:7 NKJV)

Saker Falcon (Falco cherrug) ©©

Saker Falcon (Falco cherrug) ©©

Other versions of the Bible also list the Falcon.

*  These are the translations that use falcon in Deuteronomy 14:13: (From BibleGateway)

  • ASV and the glede, and the falcon, and the kite after its kind,
  • AMP and the red kite, the falcon, and the birds of prey of any variety,
  • CSB the kites, any kind of falcon,
  • DARBY and the falcon, and the kite, and the black kite after its kind;
  • ERV red kites, falcons, any kind of kite,
  • ESV the kite, the falcon of any kind;
  • ESVUK the kite, the falcon of any kind;
  • EXB red kites, falcons, any kind of kite,
  • HCSB the kite, any kind of falcon,
  • ICB red kites, falcons, any kind of kite,
  • MEV the red kite, the falcon, and the kite after its kind,
  • NABRE the various kites and falcons,
  • NASB and the red kite, the falcon, and the kite in their kinds,
  • NCV red kites, falcons, any kind of kite,
  • NIRV They include red kites, black kites and all kinds of falcons.
  • NIV the red kite, the black kite, any kind of falcon,
  • NIVUK the red kite, the black kite, any kind of falcon,
  • NKJV the red kite, the falcon, and the kite after their kinds;
  • NLV the red kite, the falcon, every kind of kite,
  • NLT the kite, the falcon, buzzards of all kinds,
  • WEB the red kite, the falcon, the kite of any kind,
Did you notice the other birds mentioned in these verses? Many of them are Kites, including Red and Black Kites. The Glede is mentioned in one verse and is closely related to the Kites. See Bible Birds – Gledes and Kites. The Kites, Gledes, and our Falcons are considered Birds of Prey.

There are currently 66 Falcons in the Falconidae Family.

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McGuffey’s Third Reader – The Little Bird’s Song

Bell's Vireo (Vireo bellii) by Kent Nickell

Bell’s Vireo (Vireo bellii) by Kent Nickell

THE LITTLE BIRD’S SONG.

1. A little bird, with feathers brown,
Sat singing on a tree;
The song was very soft and low,
But sweet as it could be.

2. The people who were passing by,
Looked up to see the bird
That made the sweetest melody
That ever they had heard.

3. But all the bright eyes looked in vain;
Birdie was very small,
And with his modest, dark-brown coat,
He made no show at all.

4. “Why, father,” little Gracie said
“Where can the birdie be?
If I could sing a song like that,
I’d sit where folks could see.”

Philadelphia Vireo (Vireo philadelphicus) by Kent Nickell

Philadelphia Vireo (Vireo philadelphicus) by Kent Nickell

5. “I hope my little girl will learn
A lesson from the bird,
And try to do what good she can,
Not to be seen or heard.

6. “This birdie is content to sit
Unnoticed on the way,
And sweetly sing his Maker’s praise
From dawn to close of day.

“To the end that my glory may sing praise to You and not be silent. O LORD my God, I will give thanks to You forever.” (Psalms 30:12 NKJV)

7. “So live, my child, all through your life,
That, be it short or long,
Though others may forget your looks,
They’ll not forget your song.”

Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus) by Raymond Barlow

Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus) by Raymond Barlow

“All the earth shall worship You And sing praises to You; They shall sing praises to Your name.” Selah” (Psalms 66:4 NKJV)


Title: McGuffey’s Third Eclectic Reader, Author: William Holmes McGuffey
Release Date: January 23, 2005 [EBook #14766]

 

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net

 

McGuffey’s Third Reader – Humming Birds

Rufous-tailed Hummingbird (Amazilia tzacatl) by Judd Patterson

Rufous-tailed Hummingbird (Amazilia tzacatl) by Judd Patterson

LESSON XXI. HUMMING BIRDS.
McGuffey's Third Eclectic Reader from Gutenberg.org

McGuffey’s Third Eclectic Reader from Gutenberg.org

1. The most beautiful humming birds are found in the West Indies and South America. The crest of the tiny head of one of these shines like a sparkling crown of colored light.

2. The shades of color that adorn its breast, are equally brilliant. As the bird flits from one object to another, it looks more like a bright flash of sunlight than it does like a living being.

Magnificent Hummingbird (Eugenes fulgens) by Judd Patterson

Magnificent Hummingbird (Eugenes fulgens) by Judd Patterson

3. But, you ask, why are they called humming birds? It is because they make a soft, humming noise by the rapid motion of their wings—a motion so rapid, that as they fly you can only see that they have wings.

4. One day when walking in the woods, I found the nest of one of the smallest humming birds. It was about half the size of a very small hen’s egg, and was attached to a twig no thicker than a steel knitting needle.

Vervain Hummingbird (Mellisuga minima) WikiC

Vervain Hummingbird (Mellisuga minima) WikiC

5. It seemed to have been made of cotton fibers, and was covered with the softest bits of leaf and bark. It had two eggs in it, quite white, and each about as large as a small sugarplum.

6. When you approach the spot where one of these birds has built its nest, it is necessary to be careful. The mother bird will dart at you and try to peck your eyes. Its sharp beak may hurt your eyes most severely, and even destroy the sight.

7. The poor little thing knows no other way of defending its young, and instinct teaches it that you might carry off its nest if you could find it.

“If a bird’s nest happens to be before you along the way, in any tree or on the ground, with young ones or eggs, with the mother sitting on the young or on the eggs, you shall not take the mother with the young;” (Deuteronomy 22:6 NKJV)

Title: McGuffey’s Third Eclectic Reader, Author: William Holmes McGuffey
Release Date: January 23, 2005 [EBook #14766]

The Owl – McGuffey’s Second Grade Reader

Western Screech Owl (Megascops kennicottii)(captive) by Raymond Barlow

Western Screech Owl (Megascops kennicottii)(captive) by Raymond Barlow

McGuffey Readers were a series of graded primers for grade levels 1-6. They were widely used as textbooks in American schools from the mid-19th century to the mid-20th century, and are still used today in some private schools and in homeschooling.

LESSON LII.

oak dusk fight squeak ruf’fled

bag Fred whoo a wake’ creep’ing

THE OWL.

1. “Where did you get that owl, Harry?”

2. “Fred and I found him in the old, hollow oak.”

3. “How did you know he was there?”

4. “I’ll tell you. Fred and I were playing ‘hide and seek’ round the old barn, one night just at dusk.

5. “I was just creeping round the corner, when I heard a loud squeak, and a big bird flew up with something in his claws.

6. “I called Fred, and we watched him as he flew to the woods. Fred thought the bird was an owl, and that he had a nest in the old oak.

Barn Owls (Family Tytonidae) with catch ©Pixelbirds

7. “The next day we went to look for him, and, sure enough, he was there.”

8. “But how did you catch him? I should think he could fight like a good fellow with that sharp bill.”

9. “He can when he is wide awake; but owls can’t see very well in the daytime, and he was taking a nap.

Northern Barred Owl (Strix varia) LPZ by Dan 2014

Northern Barred Owl (Strix varia) LPZ by Dan 2014

10. “He opened his great eyes, and ruffled up his feathers, and said, “Whoo! Whoo!’ ‘Never mind who,’ Fred said, and slipped him into a bag.”

Eurasian Eagle-Owl (Bubo bubo) by Nikhil Devasar

Eurasian Eagle-Owl (Bubo bubo) by Nikhil Devasar

May kinds of owls are mentioned in the Bible. Most of them are listed as birds to not eat.

“… the short-eared owl, ;… the little owl, the fisher owl, and the screech owl; the white owl,… (Leviticus 11:16-18 NKJV)

McGuffey’s Reader for 2nd Grade:

ABC’s of the Gospel

 

A Beautiful Rainbow

Rainbow Lorikeet Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

The friendly Rainbow Lorikeet at Lowry Park Zoo has been shown here before, along with the rainbow we saw on our trip through South Carolina several years ago.

Carolina rainbow spotted on Vacation 9-3-2013

This rainbow is much brighter and it’s a double rainbow. I enjoy seeing rainbows because they are a reminder of God’s promise to never totally flood the earth. There is no need today to build another Ark to save righteous people and the many animals and birds.

“And God said: “This is the sign of the covenant which I make between Me and you, and every living creature that is with you, for perpetual generations: I set My rainbow in the cloud, and it shall be for the sign of the covenant between Me and the earth. It shall be, when I bring a cloud over the earth, that the rainbow shall be seen in the cloud; and I will remember My covenant which is between Me and you and every living creature of all flesh; the waters shall never again become a flood to destroy all flesh.” (Genesis 9:12-15 NKJV)

Rainbow Across Yellowstone Lake ©David Grimes

Here is another bird with Rainbow in its name. The Rainbow-bearded Thornbill (Chalcostigma herrani). Michael Woodruff took this photo, but was not real close to it.

Rainbow-bearded Thornbill (Chalcostigma herrani) by Michael Woodruff

Rainbow-bearded Thornbill (Chalcostigma herrani) by Michael Woodruff

Look at this one! Wow! This is a closeup of the Rainbow-bearded Thornbill.

 Rainbow-bearded Thornbill (Chalcostigma herrani) ©Flickr Jei Pov

Rainbow-bearded Thornbill (Chalcostigma herrani) ©Flickr Jei Pov

The Rainbow-bearded Thornbill (Chalcostigma herrani) is a species of hummingbird in the family Trochilidae. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical high-altitude grassland.

Rainbow-bearded Thornbill – Wikipedia

Rainbow-bearded Thornbill – Neo-tropical Birds

Rainbow-bearded Thornbill – HBAlive

Wordless Hummingbirds

Heathcliff’s North American Hot Dog Hawk

Today’s Heathcliff – The poor cat, Heathcliff, had his hot dog stolen by a swooping “Hot Dog Hawk.” Not sure if this hawk will ever show up in our Bird Guides.

Short-tailed Hawk (Buteo brachyurus) ©WikiC

Not exactly which genus it belongs to,

Heathcliff's Hot Dog Hawk 8-9-19

Heathcliff’s Hot Dog Hawk 8-9-19

But if that Hot Dog hawk had tried that with this Red-winged Blackbird, then there would be a battle over the Hot Dog. Maybe this is Heathcliff’s friend coming to the rescue.

“A man who has friends must himself be friendly, But there is a friend who sticks closer than a brother.” (Proverbs 18:24 NKJV)

Blackbird on a Hawk's Back ©Dept of Interior

Blackbird on a Hawk’s Back ©Dept of Interior

“A merry heart does good, like medicine, But a broken spirit dries the bones.” (Proverbs 17:22 NKJV)

ABC’s of the Gospel

Double Life of the Hummingbird – Creation Moments

Hummingbird family by Bob-Nan

Hummingbird family by Bob-Nan

Learn more about one of
God’s most unusual creatures by watching our video
“Double Life of the Hummingbird”

 Who doesn’t love the beautiful hummingbird? You’ll love them even more after viewing our “Double Life of the Hummingbird” video! That’s because you’ll about the unique abilities their Designer has given them. Truly, hummingbirds bear evidence of God’s creative hand!           

This Week’s Creation Action Moment

1. Watch our “Double Life of the Hummingbird” video by clicking on the picture above.

2. Then check out our Moments with God’s Creation 3-DVD set to add this video and more than 70 others like it to your home DVD collection. Your whole family will enjoy watching videos like these:

  • God’s Agriculture and the Stink Bug
  • The Venus Flytrap
  • Birds Who Build Pyramids
  • Reptilian Fuzzy Feet
  • The Double Life of the Hummingbird

When you order Moments with God’s Creation 3-DVD set at our online bookstore, you will also be helping Creation Moments stay on the air!

Vervain Hummingbird (Mellisuga minima) WikiC

Vervain Hummingbird (Mellisuga minima) WikiC


Click to learn about the easiest way to make
our ministry your ministry!

“I will both lay me down in peace, and sleep: for thou, LORD, only makest me dwell in safety.” (Psalms 4:8 KJV)

Wordless Woodpecker

McGuffey’s 6th Grade Reader – The Solitary Reaper

Asian Emerald Cuckoo (Chrysococcyx maculatus) by NikhilDevasar

Asian Emerald Cuckoo (Chrysococcyx maculatus) by NikhilDevasar

McGuffey’s 6th Grade Reader – The Solitary Reaper

William Wordsworth, 1770-1850, the founder of the “Lake School” of poets, was born at Cockermouth, Cumberland, England. From his boyhood he was a great lover and student of nature, and it is to his beautiful descriptions of landscape, largely, that he owes his fame. He was a graduate of Cambridge University, and while there commenced the study of Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, and Shakespeare, as models for his own writings. Two legacies having been bequeathed him, Wordsworth determined to make poetry the aim of his life, and in 1795 located at Racedown with his sister Dorothy, where he commenced the tragedy of “The Borderers.” A visit from Coleridge at this period made the two poets friends for life. In 1802 Wordsworth married Miss Mary Hutchinson, and in 1813 he settled at Rydal Mount, on Lake Windermere, where he passed the remainder of his life.

Wordsworth’s poetry is remarkable for its extreme simplicity of language. At first his efforts were almost universally ridiculed, and in 1819 his entire income from literary work had not amounted to 140 Pounds. In 1830 his merit began to be recognized; in 1839 Oxford University conferred upon him the degree of D. C. L.; and in 1843 he was made poet laureate.

“The Excursion” is by far the most beautiful and the most important of
Wordsworth’s productions. “Salisbury Plain,” “The White Doe of Rylstone,”
“Yarrow Revisited,” and many of his sonnets and minor poems are also much
admired.
###

The Solitary Reaper

Behold her, single in the field,
Yon solitary Highland lass!
Reaping and singing by herself;
Stop here, or gently pass!
Alone she cuts and binds the grain,
And sings a melancholy strain;
Oh listen! for the vale profound
Is overflowing with the sound.

Thrush Nightingale (Luscinia luscinia) ©©SergeyYeliseev

Thrush Nightingale (Luscinia luscinia) ©©SergeyYeliseev

No nightingale did ever chant
More welcome notes to weary bands
Of travelers in some shady haunt,
Among Arabian sands:
A voice so thrilling ne’er was heard
In springtime from the cuckoo bird,
Breaking the silence of the seas
Among the farthest Hebrides.

Jacobin Cuckoo (Clamator jacobinus) by Nikhil Devasar

Jacobin Cuckoo (Clamator jacobinus) by Nikhil Devasar

Will no one tell me what she sings?
Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow
For old, unhappy, far-off things,
And battles long ago:
Or is it some more humble lay,
Familiar matter of to-day?
Some natural sorrow, loss, or pain,
That has been, and may be again?

Black-headed Nightingale-Thrush (Catharus mexicanus) by Michael Woodruff

Black-headed Nightingale-Thrush (Catharus mexicanus) by Michael Woodruff

Whate’er the theme, the maiden sang
As if her song could have no ending;
I saw her singing at her work,
And o’er the sickle bending;—
I listened motionless and still;
And, as I mounted up the hill,
The music in my heart I bore,
Long after it was heard no more.

“Speaking to yourselves in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord; Giving thanks always for all things unto God and the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ;” (Ephesians 5:19-20 KJV)

Please leave a comment about whether these are helpful and enjoyable to you, your children, or your grandchildren. Maybe, even your students.

These are coming from the Gutenberg books online:

Wordless Birds

 

The McGuffey’s Reader Posts

Bald Eagle (close up) LP Zoo by Lee

Bald Eagle (close up) LP Zoo by Lee

If you have stopped by recently, you have noticed the different articles from the McGuffey’s Readers. So far, there have been posts from the Second Grade, Third Grade, Fourth Grade and the Sixth Grade Readers.

McGuffey Readers were a series of graded primers for grade levels 1-6. They were widely used as textbooks in American schools from the mid-19th century to the mid-20th century, and are still used today in some private schools and in homeschooling.

My question is would you like more of these posted? School will be starting soon and your young readers may find these useful for reading practice. Then again, they may be so busy they do not have time to read extra stories.

These all have good tales to tell, and I have been busy finding the BIRD stories, of course. I have found many more articles that can be made from the McGuffey’s Readers. They are full of stories that have good morals to them. Here they are updated with current neat bird pictures and Scripture verses.

House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) Five ©Indiatoday

House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) Five ©Indiatoday

Please leave a comment about whether these are helpful and enjoyable to you, your children, or your grandchildren. Maybe, even your students.

These are coming from the Gutenberg books online:

Yes, I have plans to do First Grade and Fifth Grade stories, if the answers are positive.

“Iron sharpens iron; so a man sharpens the countenance of his friend [to show rage or worthy purpose].” (Proverbs 27:17 AMP)

Wordless Birds