How Many Feathers? – Creation Moments

Tongtianlong Cropped ©WikiC

And God made the beast of the earth after his kind, and cattle after their kind, and every thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind: and God saw that it was good.” Genesis 1:25

 Today, we often see pictures of dinosaurs covered in feathers, which used to be represented with bare scales. Why has this change occurred? There is a preconceived notion, held by many evolutionists, that birds evolved from therapod dinosaurs, such as tyrannosaurus and the smaller raptor dinosaurs.

One such dinosaur reported in the media just a few years ago was Tongtianlong limosus. Apparently, its name means “muddy dragon on the road to heaven”. This sheep-sized dinosaur was discovered in China, and the fossil had an arched neck and raised head, as if it was trying to get free of something. Artists’ impressions of the creature show it covered with feathers, and reporters and researchers alike assume that this is correct. One scientific commentator said, “Modern birds came from dinosaurs … and it’s dinosaurs like Tongtianlong that give us a glimpse of what the ancestors of modern birds would have looked like. Fossils like these capture evolution in action.” Yet, this is simply not the case and appears to be an example of circular reasoning. The fossil shows no sign of feathers – not even the so-called dubious proto-feathers associated with other finds. It is simply the type of dinosaur that has caused it to be so classified by evolutionists, exercising more artistic license than is appropriate for serious scientific work.

In the Bible we read that God made birds on day five, and He made land animals on day six, so birds could not have evolved from dinosaurs.

Prayer: Lord God, You made everything right, in the way that You designed it, according to Your glory. Amen.

Author: Paul F. Taylor

Ref: Robinson, P. (2016), Sorry, how many feathers did you find?, < https://creation.com/sorry-how-many-feathers-did-you-find >, accessed 5/1/2019. Image: CC BY-SA 4.0 International.

Used With Permission: © 2020 Creation Moments, Inc.


“If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” Adolf Hitler

“If I told you earthly things and you do not believe, how will you believe if I tell you heavenly things?” [Jesus’ Words] (John 3:12 NASB)

If people do not believe the things that the Lord said about His Creation, and continue to make up false theories, how will they ever believe the truth of Christ’s offer of salvation?

Will they prepare for heaven? God’s Word is true, yet many refuse to believe it. They would rather lie, than accept the truth. So sad. Maybe a good title for this article should have been,

“How Many Lies!”

Creation Moments – How Many Feathers?

Creation Moments

More Creation Moment articles here

ABC’s of the Gospel

Birdwatching At Home – Maybe III

Gator and Sandhill Cranes 05-20-20 by Lee

Gator and Sandhill Cranes 05-20-20 by Lee

“Ponder the path of your feet, And let all your ways be established.” (Proverbs 4:26 NKJV)

In Birdwatching At Home – Maybe Part I and Part II, I referred to our gator that hangs out at the edge of our backyard. Here is the video I promised.

The two Sandhills had been on our back lanai and we had shooed them off. They went down to the water at the end of our yard and started teasing the gator. They jumped up a few times and just looked at him. Then they flew across to the other bank, and that is where I captured this on video.

[I thought I knew how to kill parts of the sound, but it killed it all. So I left the sound on. We were eating our breakfast when all of this was occurring. I was sitting in my chair filming this.]

From the following articles, it is obvious that Sandhill Cranes are quite common here in central Florida. They are fun to watch, except when the peck on the back sliding door.

Sandhill Cranes ousidet window Coventry by Lee

Sandhill Cranes ousidet window Coventry by Lee

“Yea, the stork in the heaven knoweth her appointed times; and the turtle and the crane and the swallow observe the time of their coming; but my people know not the judgment of the LORD.” (Jeremiah 8:7 KJV)

“Sandhill Cranes mate for life, choosing their partners based on dancing displays. Displaying birds stretch their wings, pump their heads, bow, and leap into the air.” [All About Birds – Sand Hill Cranes]

More about Cranes:

Bible Birds – Crane’s Introduction

Bible Birds – Cranes I

Sandhill Cranes and Rabbits

Bible Birds – Sandhill Cranes In The Yard

Thanksgiving – Sandhill Crane Colt

Emma’s Stories – Ted and Red

Eye of the Beholder – Ibises and Crane

Wordless Birds

Birdwatching At Home – Maybe II

Old Bench for Backyard Birdwatching

Old Bench for Backyard Birdwatching

Our gator adventure has been keeping me from using my bench, but we still have lots of birds to watch. Just from a safer distance. In Birdwatching At Home – Maybe I, I explained why I haven’t used my bench too much yet. The talk of the neighborhood, “our own gator,” brings visitors to the water. As I mentioned before, we don’t get to see it most of the time because of the embankment.

When he [or she] moves more to the middle of the water, then we get to see it. When we came home from church, Sunday (5-17), there he was. We both grabbed our cameras, which we now keep at the table by the door. Here is what I saw:

Dan taking a photo of the gator and me taking of photo of him.

Dan taking a photo of the gator and me taking of photo of him.

Then I zoomed in on what he was taking a photo of:

What Dan Was Photographying by Lee 5-17-20

What Dan Was Photographying by Lee 5-17-20

We still have that Variant House Finch stopping by. He feeds at the feeder up by the door. Much safer there. The sun was shining brightly, and it made him almost glow. Here a few I took a few days ago:

Variant House Finch 5-14-20

Variant House Finch 5-14-20

Variant House Finch 5-14-20

Variant House Finch 5-14-20

Also recently, the three species I mentioned in the first post, we spotted though the door on May 16th. Here are a few more closeups:

Great Blue Heron close up

Great Blue Heron close up

“And the stork, the heron after her kind, and the lapwing, and the bat.” (Leviticus 11:19 KJV) – Don’t Eat List

Great Blue Heron with neck bent in S

Great Blue Heron with neck bent in S – Sandhill Crane in foreground

Great Egret 5-16-20

Great Egret 5-16-20

I know these are not the greatest photos, but I sure do enjoy seeing so many interesting birds to watch, and even the alligator. Stay tuned for a video I shot this morning.

Birdwatching At Home – Maybe I

Bible Birds – Herons

Bible Birds – Cranes

Wordless Birds

 

 

Birdwatching At Home – Maybe I

Old Bench for Backyard Birdwatching

Old Bench for Backyard Birdwatching

Recently, we laid a few blocks down in the backyard so that I [we] could use our old bench. My goal was to be able to watch some of the numerous birds that stop or fly by. Needless to say, the bench needs a little TLC [tender love and care] This was taken May 14th.

I grabbed my camera and took a few photos, thinking I’d start a new series called: Backyard Birdwatching. Real original, right?

Great White Egret - First bird spotted from bench 05-14-20

Great White Egret – First bird spotted from bench 05-14-20

Had to wait for him to get in the clear.

Great White Egret finally in the clear 05-14-20

Great White Egret finally in the clear 05-14-20

I took a few photos and then the next day, decided that plan may be put on hold for awhile. Why? Hang on.

On the 16th, I was able to capture three different species through our door. We were having breakfast when they all appeared. A Great Blue Heron and Great Egret by the water’s edge and the two pesky Sandhill Cranes.

Three species from our door 05-16-20

Three species from our door 05-16-20

Why was I shooting through the door instead of from my bench? Well, this dude showed up the 15th.

Alligator Taken from my neighbor's yard. 05-16-20

Alligator Taken from my neighbor’s yard. 05-16-20

This Alligator is at the end of our yard. Because of the incline by the bank, we don’t get to see him often. So, I went to my neighbor’s yard and took this. She was with me, so if I had to waddle away fast, she could help me. Our neighbor, from across the water, told us that he comes and has layed on our bank at about 6 or 7 every morning for that last few days. Yikes!!

Needless to say, I have not been using my bench, yet!!

“Of the birds after their kind, of animals after their kind, and of every creeping thing of the earth after its kind, two of every kind will come to you to keep them alive.” (Genesis 6:20 NKJV)

We know that at least two of each kind of birds and creeping things were kept alive in the ark. I wonder if the alligators were on board, or swimming? Never thought about that before. Have you?

More later. We had a great view of this gator and the two Sandhill cranes today. Stay turned!

 

Clyde and Benny – Crow And A Robin

Clyde and Benny by Emma Foster

American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) by Kent Nickell

American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) by Kent Nickell

Clyde was an old crow who lived in a tall pine tree in the darkest part of the woods. Because preferred to spend time away from all the other birds and forest animals, he didn’t have any friends. Many of the other birds avoided him because they were afraid of him.

But one day Clyde returned with a large worm in his mouth to his nest to find something in his nest. That something was a little white egg. Clyde had no idea where the egg had come from or how it had gotten there, but he knew he did not want the egg in his nest. While he was thinking about what to do with it, the egg started shaking. A few moments later, a tiny robin chick popped out, peeping loudly.

American Robin (Turdus migratorius) Hatching ©WikiC

Now Clyde really didn’t know what to do. He wanted to be left alone, but the tiny robin flopped out of the egg and stared at him, thinking that Clyde was his mother. Clyde thought for a long time, thinking that he should find another nest somewhere else, but the chick looked too helpless for him to leave. Instead, he reluctantly gave the chick the worm he found and went to look for its mother.

Clyde searched all through the forest, but he couldn’t find any other family of robins. Many of the birds were surprised at seeing Clyde, and most of them hid in the trees to keep away from him. Clyde returned to his nest, back to the chick, and he decided that he would have to keep him. Eventually Clyde decided to call him Benny.

Even though Clyde gave Benny his name, he still did not want Benny around. Clyde begrudgingly found extra worms for Benny and himself. However, once Benny was old enough to fly out of the nest, Clyde showed him how to find the worms for himself so he wouldn’t bother him so much.

Crow Getting Worm ©PxHere

Crow Getting Worm ©PxHere

Unfortunately, teaching Benny how to fly took what felt like hours to Clyde. Benny was a very clumsy little robin. The first time, Benny fluttered out of the nest, dropped, and flopped onto the branch below them. Clyde had to set Benny on his back, take him back up to the nest, then start all over again. Finally, Benny was able to fly a few feet to the next branch, which was a great relief to Clyde.

Once Benny, learned how to fly, however, Benny would not leave Clyde alone. He followed Clyde wherever he went, even after Clyde showed Benny where to actually find food. Whenever Clyde passed other birds or animals, they wondered who the tiny robin was because they had no idea where he came from.

Clyde became so tired of Benny following him around that one day, he took Benny to an unfamiliar part of the forest. Now that he thought Benny could take care of himself, he figured he could lose Benny somewhere in the woods. When they reached a small river, Clyde waited for Benny to start searching for food like he had been told. Once Benny was distracted, Clyde flew off, not looking back until he was far away from the river.

Clyde returned to his nest, but he realized it felt empty and quiet. It was just like before Benny arrived, when all the other birds were afraid of him and he had no one to talk to. Clyde started to feel very lonely, and he realized he shouldn’t have left Benny all by himself. Clyde immediately wanted to fly back to the river.

As Clyde made his way back, he realized he had taken a wrong turn. All of the trees looked unfamiliar. Clyde sat down on a branch and thought for a long time on where to go. He worried abut Benny, since he was lost as well. He cawed for Benny for a long time, but he never received an answer. Finally, Clyde heard a rustling of branches a little way off.

Crow in Nest ©NeedPix

Clyde the Crow in Nest ©NeedPix

When Clyde rounded the corner he saw something flapping from branch to branch, shaking the leaves. Clyde realized that the bird was Benny, and that he couldn’t fly well because he had found the largest worm Clyde had ever seen.

American Robin on Nest ©Alarmy

Benny the American Robin inn Nest ©Alarmy

Clyde returned to Benny, who dropped the worm, surprised that Clyde was so frantic. Benny hadn’t even known that Clyde had gone, but Clyde still apologized. He helped Benny take the worm back to the nest. Every day after that, Clyde and Benny spent all their time together. Even after Benny grew up. Benny placed his nest directly in the tree beside Clyde’s.


“Here’s my concern: that you care for God’s flock with all the diligence of a shepherd. Not because you have to, but because you want to please God. Not calculating what you can get out of it, but acting spontaneously.” (1 Peter 5:2 MSG)

Lee’s Addition:

Emma sent this delightful story to me recently. I trust you will enjoy it as much as I have putting the photos in. She, like many students, college or younger, has been finishing her classes at home.

The verse above has to do with pastors, but the principles apply to this story. Not so sure Clyde was so willing at first, but he came around. Thanks again,Emma, for another tale for us.

See All Of Emma’s Stories Here

 

McGuffey’s Reader – First Grade Lessons LVI and LVII

Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons) singing ©nebirdsplus

Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons) singing ©nebirdsplus

These lessons start off with words, then the story. You can practice writing with the Slate Work.

“The flowers appear on the earth; the time of the singing of birds is come, …” (Song of Solomon 2:12a KJV)

LESSON LVI.

strong round dry bill worked

sends claws flit God spring

“How does the bird make the nest so strong, Willie?”

“The mother bird has her bill and her claws to work with, but she would not know how to make the nest if God did not teach her. Do you see what it is made of?”

“Yes, Willie, I see some horse-hairs and some dry grass. The old bird must have worked hard to find all the hairs, and make them into such a pretty, round nest.”

“Shall we take the nest, Rose?”

“Oh no, Willie! We must not take it; but we will come and look at it again, some time.”

Verdin (Auriparus flaviceps) Building Nest 1 ©Earle Robinson

SLATE WORK.

[Illustration: Script Exercise:]

God made the little birds to sing,
And flit from tree to tree;
‘Tis He who sends them in the spring
To sing for you and me.


LESSON LVII.

feathers a go’ fly worm crumb feed’ing

ug’ly off feed brown guess things

Grey Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) Feeding at Nest WikiC

Grey Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) Feeding at Nest WikiC

“Willie, when I was feeding the birds just now, a little brown bird flew away with a crumb in its bill.”

“Where did it go, Rose?”

“I don’t know; away off, somewhere.”

“I can guess where, Rose. Don’t you know the nest we saw some days ago?
What do you think is in it now?”

“O Willie, I know! Some little brown birds. Let us go and see them.”

“All right; but we must not go too near. There! I just saw the old bird fly out of the bush. Stand here, Rose. Can you see?”

“Why, Willie, what ugly little things! What big mouths they have, and no feathers!”

“Keep still, Rose. Here comes the old bird with a worm in her bill. How hard she must work to feed them all!”


McGuffey’s Reader First Grade Introduction

The Wordless Book

Laughter From A Bird

Kookaburra Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

Laughing Kookaburra Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

A friend sent me a message with a Kookaburra video. and was wondering if this is a Kookaburra. In response, I reminded her of these previous articles here. We all need to laugh and let off some of our pent up boredom, fustration, idleness, loneliness, or just Need A Good Laugh for our soul’s Well-being.

A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance: but by sorrow of the heart the spirit is broken. (Proverbs 15:13 KJV)

Meet Merlin, from the Orlando Sea World:

Here are some more cool things about the Merlin the Kookaburra and other critters at Sea World:

Here are some of the articles from the past with these good-natured birds:

Kookaburra Encounter at Brevard Zoo – 2014

Birds Of The Bible – Joy And Laughter – 2013

From Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures Plus:

Kookaburra – Chattery Birds With A Merry Heart – 2010

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Laughing Kookaburra -2011

Kookaburra Encounter – 2014

Tickle Me Tuesday Revived – Laughing Kookaburras – 2019

Kingfishers And Kookaburras – From Creation Moments – 2020

Kookaburra at Brevard Zoo by Dan

Laughing Kookabura Brevard Zoo

Laughing Kookabura Brevard Zoo

Lee and Kookaburra at Brevard Zoo by Dan

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) at Cincinnati Zoo

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) at Cincinnati Zoo by Lee

Have a great day, and may you keep a smile on your face and in your heart.

 

 

 

 

House Finch Variants

House Finch on Feeder by Lee

House Finch on Feeder by Lee

Do you know what a House Finch looks like? We have been fortunate to have several families of these Finches visit our bird feeders lately. It is always enjoyable to have these little birds come by for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. In fact, these little flying avian wonders come by for snacks also. In other words, keep your eye on the feeders.

You can check out the Identification of House Finches as All About Birds – House Finch ID

When a Finch with a different color lands on your feeder, you get excited and question yourself, “What is this?” This happened lately, and caused me to look in the bird guides and search the internet bird sites, like All About Birds and others.

This eye opener landed on our feeder last week:

Varient House Finch on Feeder by Lee

Variant House Finch on Feeder by Lee

Varient House Finch on Feeder by Lee

Variant House Finch on Feeder by Lee

“He gives to the beast its food, And to the young ravens [or Finches] that cry.” (Psalms 147:9 NKJV)

Varient House Finch on Feeder by Lee

Variant House Finch on Feeder by Lee

What happened to this fellow? Apparently, diet or what the bird eats, affects its color. See this article, Orange or Yellow by All About Birds.

“Who provides food for the raven [or Finch], When its young ones cry to God, And wander about for lack of food?” (Job 38:41 NKJV)

Keep your eyes open while bird watching. You never know what might show up! Stay Tuned!

The Salvation Story

Ducks “Social Distancing”

Black-bellied Whistling Ducks by Lee 3-15-20

Recently we were visited by a small flock of Black-bellied Whistling Ducks. Not sure who told them to “Social Distance,” but they seem to be doing it.

A few years ago, we were at the shore where these birds were not practicing this. Then again, who had ever heard of “Social Distancing” until recently?

Crowded Shore at MacDill by Lee

These shorebirds definitely are NOT “Social Distanced.” We are trusting and praying that you are staying safe and finding things to do while staying home. Check the links along the sides of this page. There are many things and birds you can read about.

Remember that the Lord never wants us to “Social distance” from Him.

“But it is good for me to draw near to God; I have put my trust in the Lord GOD, That I may declare all Your works.” (Psalms 73:28 NKJV)

Spend some of your time at home checking out these topics:

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck Trying To Decide

Bible Birds – Whistling Ducks

Bible Birds

Scriptural Alphabet

Watching Birds

Golden Eagle

Bird Tales

Orni-Theology

Wordless Birds

 

50 Bird Species Sounds

Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) by Daves BirdingPix

Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) by Daves BirdingPix

Thought you might enjoy learning about the sounds of 50 birds. This is from an email link I received. It looks like, but you will have to click the link to actually hear the sounds. Enjoy!! [Make sure you turn your sound up.]

You will be able to click any bird to hear the sounds they make! Click a second time to pause the sound. 

This is view of the what you will see:

2020-04-03 23_43_07-

American Goldfinch American Robin Asian Koel Atlantic Puffin Bald Eagle Barn Owl Barn Swallow Black-Capped Chickadee Blue Jay Canada Goose Canary (Common) Cardinal Common Wood Pigeon Crow (American) Cuckoo Eurasian Wren European Robin Flamingo (American) Horned Lark Horned Owl House Sparrow Hyacinth Macaw Indigo Bunting Laughing Kookaburra Loon (Common) Magellanic Penguin Mallard Duck Mourning Dove Nightingale (Common) Northern Flicker Northern Mockingbird Osprey Parakeet (Budgerigar) Peafowl (Common) Pileated Woodpecker Purple Martin Raven (Common) Red-Winged Blackbird Rock Dove Rooster Snipe (Common) Song Thrush Starling (Common) Swift (Common) Tern (Common) Tufted Titmouse Turkey (Wild) Veery Whooper Swan Wood Thrush

“Another parable He put forth to them, saying: “The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed, which a man took and sowed in his field, which indeed is the least of all the seeds; but when it is grown it is greater than the herbs and becomes a tree, so that the birds of the air come and nest in its branches.” (Matthew 13:31-32 NKJV)

Wordless Birds

 

Things To Do While Staying Home

Swallow-tailed Kite

Like many of you, we are staying home during this time of protecting ourselves from the Corvid-19 threat. So, what are we to do?

Here are a few suggestions to keep you learning, especially about our wonderful Avian Wonders, birds, that the Lord created. There are many things about the birds that we can be entertained by and educated from websites on the internet.

“And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” (Genesis 1:22 NKJV)

Of course, you can check out our sites:

Here are few other places to check out:

Pete Thayer is offering free birdwatching software for students. Hurry, as there is a limited number available. It is great. I use it myself. [This is from my email.]

March 2020
Birding Software For Kids 
The coronavirus (COVID-19) has forced thousands of schools across the country to close for weeks. What are your kids or grand-kids going to do with themselves?
We have an interesting suggestion. Let them explore over 1,000 birds of North America. Take over 700 fun quizzes about birds. Listen to bird songs in their area. Watch videos of bird behavior. Learn more about their favorite birds.

Thayer Birding Software has started a “Young Birder” Program. Our goal is to give away one million copies of our software to kids 18 and younger. This seems like the perfect week to help spread the word about this no-cost program.

We want kids to discover birding and the joys of nature at an early age. You can help by letting others know about this program. Forward this newsletter to your neighbors, relatives, local teachers, school administrators, Audubon clubs, Scout leaders and even kids in your neighborhood.

(Maybe this offer will even go “viral”)
It is very easy to download a copy

Then click the “Windows download” button

Now click the “Add Promo button”

type in ThayerYoungBirder

Visit our web site to find out more.
Our software will also work on older Mac operating systems such as Mac OS X 10.9 – MacOS 10.13. This includes High Sierra, Sierra, El Capitan, Yosemite and Mavericks. If you have Mojave or Catalina click HERE for important information.
If you liked this free newsletter be sure to forward a copy to your friends so they can enjoy it too.
Pete Thayer and the Thayer Birding Software Newsletter Team9048 Whimbrel Watch Lane, Unit 202, Naples Florida 34109
E-mail us
]

Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) by Dan (closeup)

The Avian Conservation Center is South Carolina has this:

To facilitate continued access to our educational programming during this time of social distancing and e-learning, we are implementing a temporary learning program, which will allow students to connect to our educational content remotely. In addition to live streaming presentations on our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/scbirdsofprey,) we will also be adding educational videos to our YouTube (http://bit.ly/33rV0up) channel and other educational content will be posted on our website (www.thecenterforbirdsofprey.org.) Although we are sad not to be able to see you in person, we are excited to have our community join us online!

Stay Tuned for more ideas!

Wordless Woodpecker

Raven That Shakes His Tail

Thought you might enjoy this Raven. Not your typical Avian Wonder.

“Who provides food for the raven, When its young ones cry to God, And wander about for lack of food?” (Job 38:41 NKJV)

Most ravens have to search for their food, that the Lord provides. This Raven seems to have figured out how to charm this young man into providing food for him. There is a lot of trust shown here by both. The Lord has provided to feed the raven through this human.