Sorry for the Long Delay

There hasn’t been a blog posted here since Aug 5th. The last few articles were scheduled ahead of time as I had back surgery on Aug 3rd. My overnight stay in the hospital turned out to be 5 days in the hospital. I had side affects like fluid build up in the sac by the lung. Could hardly breathe and that had to drained. And other side issues. Got out on Tuesday, and ended up in the Emergency Room the next day for another side-affect.

“Withhold not thou thy tender mercies from me, O LORD: let thy lovingkindness and thy truth continually preserve me.” (Psalms 40:11 KJV)

But all is not lost. Dr. James J. S. Johnson [Dr. Jim, to me] has kept the main blog active with some very interesting articles. So, if you are not a follower of Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures Plus [the main blog], take a look at the last articles that were posted over there. I trust, with the Lord’s continued healing, that things will get back to normal soon.

Shake a Leg (or 2 or 3 or 4), Crab-Eater! – Aug 7

Crazy as a Coot! – Aug 8

Pinyon Jay, Grand Canyon’s Forester – Aug 9

Killdeer atop Killdeer: Appreciating Help from Others – Aug 10

Loggerhead Shrike: Converting Thorns into Meat-hooks – Aug 11

Oystercatchers Must be Gentiles – Aug 12

Eggs Taste Better if Salted – Aug 13

Penguin Eggs Tragedy – Aug 14

Emma’s Stories Retold – Lizzy and the Penguin Catapult

Emperor Penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) ©WikiC

Emperor Penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) ©WikiC

Emma’s Stories Retold – Lizzy and the Penguin Catapult

~ by Emma Foster

Once there was a penguin named Lizzy who lived with many other penguins in cold Antarctica.

As the penguins traveled through the winter, Lizzy watched with great interest all the eggs that lay on the penguin dad’s feet. Lizzy was too young to go fishing with all the mother penguins that year, so she was traveling with the father penguins to someplace slightly warmer.

Emperor with egg on feet ©WikiC

Emperor with egg on feet ©WikiC

Eventually all of the penguins came to an enormous, icy lake that was too large to go around. The penguin parents huddled together and decided to build a catapult out of some wood they brought with them to build their homes. The catapult would shoot penguins one at a time over the lake. The penguins decided this because the dad penguins could not cross the lake with eggs; and, if they all traveled across it at once, the ice might break. The penguins decided the eggs would be safe because there was a lot of snow on the other side of the lake which would cushion their landing.

Gentoo Penguin - Paradise Bay

Gentoo Penguin – Paradise Bay

Lizzy helped build the catapult and it wasn’t long before it was finally completed.

The first penguin had to be launched by the catapult, but no penguin was willing to do it. Lizzy was a brave penguin and decided to go first.

The catapult was launched, and Lizzy flew through the air. She was actually flying!

Adelie Penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) by Bob-Nan

Adelie Penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) by Bob-Nan

Lizzy landed softly and safely in the snow on the other side of the lake and waved to the other penguins. One by one, the rest of the penguins catapulted over the lake with the eggs. When they were all safely on the other side, they traveled to their new home.

The End


Lee’s Addition:

“Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God; (Philippians 4:6 NKJV)

Thanks, Emma, for another delightful story. Lizzy is one brave little Penguin and also willing to help out.

I am sure the penguins, even though not humans, were thankful to their Creator for taking care of them.

“But now ask the beasts, and they will teach you; And the birds of the air, and they will tell you; Or speak to the earth, and it will teach you; And the fish of the sea will explain to you. Who among all these does not know That the hand of the LORD has done this, In whose hand is the life of every living thing, And the breath of all mankind? (Job 12:7-10 NKJV)

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See more of Emma’s Bird Tales

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ABC’s of the Gospel

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Viera Wetlands – Candy Corn Moorhen

Common Moorhen by Dan at Viera Wetlands

The Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) has a bill that reminds me so much of Candy Corn. On our latest trip to Viera Wetlands, Dan was able to capture this adult with his camera. We showed you the young one with big feet in Big Feet on July 5th.

Young Moorhen at Viera Wetlands

Here are some more photos taken previously:

Common Moorhen Parent and baby Moorhen at Lake Hollingsworth

Another Baby Moorhen at Lake Hollingsworth by Lee

Baby Moorhen – Big feet and undeveloped beak color. Lake Hollingsworth – by Lee

Baby Moorhen with Big Feet above and Adult Common Moorhen below with big feet

Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) PB Zoo by Lee

Then God said, “Let the waters abound with an abundance of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the face of the firmament of the heavens.” (Genesis 1:20 NKJV)

Back to the Candy Corn beak:

Baby Moorhen No Feathers on Wing at Lake Hollingsworth Cropped by Lee

Fact from All About Birds:

  • Newly hatched Common Gallinule chicks have spurs on their wings that help them climb into the nest or grab onto vegetation.

Common Gallinule (Gallinula galeata) Lowry Park Zoo

Common Gallinule (Gallinula galeata) Amazon and Beyond-wild – Zoo Miami – by Lee

Moorhens [Gallinule – They keep changing the names]- All About Birds

Big Feet

Wordless Waterbirds

Secretarybird – The Note Taker

Secretarybird look straight at the lens – ©Pinterest – Rudi Luyten

You would like me to take a note?

Secretarybird -Notice the eyelashes – ©Pinterest

Looking down to start writing! [Notice the eyelashes]

“Let not mercy and truth forsake you; Bind them around your neck, Write them on the tablet of your heart,” (Proverbs 3:3 NKJV)

These Secretarybird photos were on Pinterest and I decided to share them.

Secretarybird (Sagittarius serpentarius) by Africaddict

Secretarybird (Sagittarius serpentarius) by Africaddict

Secretarybirds were named this because: “The secretary bird’s English name was once thought to come from the 1800s, when Europeans first spotted these birds. Back then, male secretaries wore gray tailcoats and dark knee-length pants. They also used goose-quill pens that they carried behind their ears. This long-legged bird shares many of these same physical features: long, dark quills at the back of the head; long, gray wing and tail feathers that resemble a tailcoat; and black feathers that go midway down the legs like short pants. It’s fun to imagine how the two “secretaries” compare!” From San Diego Zoo – Secretary Bird Nice photos in this article to check out!

Secretarybird (Sagittarius serpentarius) by Lee

Secretarybird (Sagittarius serpentarius) by Lee

These are one of my many favorite birds. With over 10,700 birds in the world, it is easy to have many favorites that the Lord, their Creator, has given us to enjoy.

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Secretary Bird – The Walker

The Wise Owl

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck Trying To Decide

Shall I Go To The This Way?

Shall I Go To That Way?

And Elijah came unto all the people, and said, How long halt ye between two opinions? if the LORD be God, follow him: but if Baal, then follow him. And the people answered him not a word. (1 Kings 18:21 KJV)

Still Undecided As To Which Way To Go by Lee

Elijah went there and stood in front of the people. He said, “How long will it take you to make up your minds? If the LORD is the one and only God, follow him. But if Baal is the one and only God, follow him.” The people didn’t say anything. (1 Kings 18:21 NIrV)

Just About Decided

Elijah challenged the people: “How long are you going to sit on the fence? If GOD is the real God, follow him; if it’s Baal, follow him. Make up your minds!” Nobody said a word; nobody made a move. (1 Kings 18:21 MSG)

This Black-bellied Whistling-Duck was undecided about where to go. There were quite a few Whistling Ducks at Viera Wetlands, and they were playing “musical palm tree stubs.” They kept landing on these tree tops and chasing the other off. Yet, this verse comes to mind.

I trust all of us are decided about WHO we are going to follow.

Now for a picture of a Black-bellied Whistling-Duck by Dan [the much better photographer]

Black-bellied Whistling Duck by Dan

The Black-bellied Whistling-Duck is a large, gooselike duck with a long neck, long legs, and short tail. In flight, look for their broad wings, long neck, and hunched back.

Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks are dark overall: a chestnut breast and black belly are set off by a bright-pink bill and legs, grayish face, and broad white wing stripe, also visible in flight. Immatures are duller than adults, with a dark bill, pale breast, and mottled black belly. [Info from All About Birds]
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Andre Rieu – Amazing Grace

Thought you might enjoy this video. Andre Rieu – Amazing Grace

Amazing Grace, how sweet the sound,
That saved a wretch like me.
I once was lost but now am found,
Was blind, but now I see.

Graceful Prinia (Prinia gracilis) by Nikhil Devasar

Graceful Prinia (Prinia gracilis) by Nikhil Devasar

T’was Grace that taught my heart to fear.
And Grace, my fears relieved.
How precious did that Grace appear
The hour I first believed.

Injured Roseate Spoonbill at Flamingo Gardens by Lee

Through many dangers, toils and snares
I have already come;
‘Tis Grace that brought me safe thus far
and Grace will lead me home.

Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea) Neal Addy Gallery

Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea) Neal Addy Gallery

The Lord has promised good to me.
His word my hope secures.
He will my shield and portion be,
As long as life endures.

Yea, when this flesh and heart shall fail,
And mortal life shall cease,
I shall possess within the veil,
A life of joy and peace.

Brown-throated Sunbird (Anthreptes malacensis) ©WikiC

When we’ve been there ten thousand years
Bright shining as the sun.
We’ve no less days to sing God’s praise
Than when we’ve first begun.


Birds in Hymns

What will you do with Jesus?

 

Birds Who Build Pyramids by Creation Moments

BIRDS WHO BUILD PYRAMIDS

Listen and or Watch


Job 12:7″But ask now the beasts, and they shall teach thee; and the fowls of the air, and they shall tell thee…”

Bee-eaters are birds whose way of life and behavior are both intelligent and unusual. There are 24 species of bee-eaters.
Birds Who Build Pyramids
Bee-eaters make their living catching and eating bees and wasps with stingers. The poison in many of these stinging insects is powerful enough to kill bee-eaters, but the birds are not only skilled at avoiding stings, they know how to remove the poison from the bee when they eat it. Having captured a bee or wasp, a bee-eater will take it to a branch where he will pound its head and rub its stinging end until all of the poison has been removed from the insect’s venom sac. Once the poison is removed, the bee-eater enjoys lunch.

Bee-eaters are described as lively and sociable. You seldom see one roosting all by itself. And when the weather is cool, bee-eaters huddle together to keep each other warm. There are even reports that bee-eaters will roost on each other’s backs, forming a feathered pyramid made out of birds.

Bee-eaters Huddled Together – from email

Now, it’s possible that bee-eaters figured out that they were warmer when huddled together, although even that much intelligence had to come from their Creator. But how could bee-eaters simply “discover” how to detoxify bees? If this ability evolved by trial and error, there would probably be no descendants of the first bee-eaters around today. Obviously, this dangerous behavior would not favor survival. This makes the bee-eater one of God’s own arguments against evolution!

Southern Carmine Bee-eater (Merops nubicus) by Marc at Africaddict

Southern Carmine Bee-eater (Merops nubicus) by Marc at Africaddict

Prayer: “Lord, not only does Your wisdom surround us, but You have so generously given intelligence and wisdom to so many of Your creatures. I thank You for the wonder Your handiwork inspires. In Jesus’ Name. Amen.

Notes:
Clanbake. Natural History, Mar. 1990. p. 94. Photo: A male Blue-throated Bee-eater presents his mate with a captured insect. Photo taken by Lip Kee Yap and licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Used with permission of Creation Moments

 

Tawny Frogmouths at the Zoo

Tawny Frogmouth at Brevard Zoo 4-3-18 by Lee

At the Brevard Zoo recently, we saw two Tawny Frogmouths. They were in one of their aviaries. [An aviary is a large area where birds can fly freely.] It also makes it easier to take photos, because you are in the aviary with the birds and critters. You do not have to take the photos through cage wires, etc.

Tawny Frogmouth [either young or famale] at Brevard Zoo

“Hide not thy face from me in the day when I am in trouble; incline thine ear unto me: in the day when I call answer me speedily.” (Psalms 102:2 KJV)

The Tawny Frogmouth (Podargus strigoides) is a species of frogmouth native to and found throughout the Australian mainland and Tasmania. Tawny frogmouths are big-headed, stocky birds often mistaken for owls due to their nocturnal habits [night time] and similar coloring.

Tawny Frogmouth at Brevard Zoo 4-3-18 by Lee

Fun Fact: “Their silvery-grey plumage patterned with white, black, and brown streaks and mottles allows them to freeze into the form of a broken tree branch and become practically invisible in broad daylight.”

This one might be thinking, “What you looking at?

Tawny Frogmouth at Brevard Zoo 4-3-18 by Lee

“Watch and pray, lest you enter into temptation. The spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak.” (Matthew 26:41 NKJV)


Big Feet

Young Gallinule at Viera Wetlands

On the Fourth of July, yesterday, we were at Viera Wetlands, Viera, Florida and spotted this young Common Gallinule, depending on what they are calling it. Look at its feet. He/she has some growing to do to fit those feet.

Below is how it will look when it matures.

Common Gallinule (Gallinula chloropus) by Reinier Munguia

“I have been young, and now am old; yet have I not seen the righteous forsaken, nor his seed begging bread.” (Psalms 37:25 KJV)

Another promise our Savior and Creator has given us. Lord’s Blessings.

Common Gallinule – All About Birds

Shield of Thy Salvation

Cardinal Parents at Brevard Zoo

Cardinal Brevard Zoo

At the Brevard Zoo today, we saw some Northern Cardinals flying really close to where I was standing.

Cardinal Brevard Zoo 7-3-18

I was enjoying getting some photos, when we noticed that they were feeding a youngster who had fallen out of the nest. It had landed on a palm leaf right above the walkway where I was standing.

Cardinal Baby Brevard Zoo 7-3-18

That is when I realized the Momma Cardinal was also keeping an eye on the situation.

Momma Cardinal Brevard Zoo 7-3-1

We were quite concerned that it might fall into the walkway and someone would step on it accidentally. At the next exhibit, we told the keeper. He asked if it was the one in the palm tree. Yes. Well, he had just put it back in the next about 10 minutes before. Said he would go back and put it back in again.

We sure hope it makes it and quits getting out of the nest. It is too small to survive on its own and can’t fly yet. He also told us that there were no other little ones in the nest. I am sure that those concerned Cardinals will do their best.

“I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.” (Psalms 50:11 KJV)

I know the Lord, who Created Cardinals, knows all about the situation. If He cares about the littlest baby Cardinal, rest assured, He cares about you and I.

Photos aren’t the best, but I am writing this on my laptop and away from the editing program.

Hymns With Birds and Creation – We Sing… Verse 3

We Sing the Mighty Power of God – Verse 3

There’s not a plant or flower below but makes your glories known,

Bee – On a Flower ©WikiC

and clouds arise and tempests blow by order from your throne;

while all that borrows life from you is ever in your care,

Grey Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) Feeding at Nest WikiC

Grey Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) Feeding at Nest WikiC

and everywhere that we can be, you, God, are present there.

Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) ©WikiC

By Isaac Watts