Fish Hawk – McGuffey’s Second Grade Reader

Eastern Osprey catching fish by Ian

GRANDFATHER’S STORY.

1. “Come and sit by my knee, Jane, and grandfather will tell you a strange story.

2. “One bright Summer day, I was in a garden in a city, with a friend. “We rested underneath a fig tree. The broad leaves were green and fresh.

3. “We looked up at the ripe, purple figs. And what do you think came down through the branches of the fig tree over our heads?”

4. “Oh, a bird, grandfather, a bird!” said little Jane, clapping her hands.

5. “No, not a bird. It was a fish; a trout, my little girl.”

6. “Not a fish, grandfather! A trout come through the branches of a tree in the city’! I am sure you must be in fun.”

7. “No, Jane, I tell you the truth. My friend and I were very much surprised to see a fish falling from a fig tree.

Eastern Osprey catching fish by Ian

8. “But we ran from under the tree, and saw a fishhawk flying, and an eagle after him.

9. “The hawk had caught the fish, and was carrying it home to his nest, when the eagle saw it and wanted it.

Osprey and Eagle Fighting ©WikiC

10. “They fought for it. The fish was dropped, and they both lost it. So much for fighting!”

Western Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) dropping this fish ©Flickr Andy Morffew

Western Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) dropping this fish ©Flickr Andy Morffew

***

“Where do wars and fights come from among you? Do they not come from your desires for pleasure that war in your members?” (James 4:1 NKJV)

Both of these birds are mentioned in the Bible:


Title: McGuffey’s Second Grade Reader – Gutenberg – Author: William Holmes McGuffey

Release Date: June 29, 2005 [EBook #14668] – Language: English

Wordless Birds

What A Bird Taught – McGuffey’s Second Grade Reader

MacGillivray's Warbler

[Illustration: Bird perched on tree branch.] MacGillivray’s Warbler

LESSON XI.

twit-twee bough (bow) twit-twit top’most lock

spray mate close’ly ros’y an’swer (an’ser)

WHAT A BIRD TAUGHT.

1. Why do you come to my apple tree,
Little bird so gray?
Twit-twit, twit-twit, twit-twit-twee!
That was all he would say.

2. Why do you lock your rosy feet
So closely round the spray?
Twit-twit, twit-twit, twit-tweet!
That was all he would say.

3. Why on the topmost bough do you get,
Little bird so gray?
Twit-twit-twee! twit-twit-twit!
That was all he would say.

4. Where is your mate? come, answer me,
Little bird so gray.
Twit-twit-twit! twit-twit-twee!
That was all he would say.
Alice Cary.

***


Title: McGuffey’s Second Grade Reader – Gutenberg – Author: William Holmes McGuffey

Release Date: June 29, 2005 [EBook #14668] – Language: English

“And whoso shall receive one such little child in my name receiveth me.” (Matthew 18:5 KJV)

Wordless Birds

The Kingbird – McGuffey’s Second Grade Reader

Grey Kingbird (Tyrannus dominicensis) by Lee at Honeymoon Is SP

McGuffey Readers were a series of graded primers for grade levels 1-6. They were widely used as textbooks in American schools from the mid-19th century to the mid-20th century, and are still used today in some private schools and in homeschooling. [Posting these for young readers to enjoy and practice reading while school is out.]

Here is a story of Kingbird from the Second Grade Reader. (From Gutenberg)

McGuffey Reader Set ©WikiC

LESSON XVIII.

New Words:

ber’ries strikes rob’in ea’gle short king rid

foe dart fails sharp hawk worms ac’tive

Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) by Margaret Sloan

THE KINGBIRD.

1. The kingbird is not bigger than a robin.

2. He eats flies, and worms, and bugs, and berries.

3. He builds his nest in a tree, near some house.

4. When there are young ones in the nest, he sits on the top of a tree near them.

5. He watches to see that no bird comes to hurt them or their mother.

6. If a hawk, a crow, or even an eagle comes near, he makes a dash at it.

7. Though he is so small, he is brave, and he is also very active.

8. He never fails to drive off other birds from his nest.

9. He flies around and around the eagle, and suddenly strikes him with his sharp bill.

10. He strikes at his eye, and then darts away before the eagle can catch him.

11. Or he strikes from behind, and is off again before the eagle can turn round.

12. In a short time, the great eagle is tired of such hard blows, and flies away. He is very glad to get rid of his foe.

13. Is not the little fellow a brave bird?

14. Because he can drive off all other birds, he is called the KINGBIRD.

“Watch, stand fast in the faith, be brave, be strong.” (1 Corinthians 16:13 NKJV)

***


Title: McGuffey’s Second Grade Reader – Gutenberg – Author: William Holmes McGuffey

Release Date: June 29, 2005 [EBook #14668] – Language: English

Wordless Birds