Bible Birds – Pelican Introduction

American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) by AestheticPhotos

American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) by AestheticPhotos

“And the swan, and the pelican, and the gier eagle,” (Leviticus 11:18 KJV)

Bible Birds – Pelican Introduction

The Pelican is mentioned in three verses in the Bible (KJV). In Leviticus 11:18 and in Deuteronomy 14:17, the Pelican is listed as one of the “Do Not Eat” birds. The Jewish people, from God’s chosen people, were given a list of birds that they were not to eat. [My “Do Not Eat” birds]

In Psalms 102:6, it mentions the Pelican in the wilderness. That will be mentioned in a later article.

Pelicans are huge birds that are larger than swans and have a remarkably enormous bill. The lower part of the bill is like a large pouch or bag that can expand to hold quarts of water. The pelican places the fish they catch in this lower part of the bill.

Brown Pelican with fish and Laughing Gull

Brown Pelican with fish in pouch and a Laughing Gull

The White Pelican was recording holding three gallons of water in that pouch. Wow! They belong to the Pelecanidae family which is in the Pelecaniformes Order. There are eight species of Pelicans:

Mature Brown Pelican by Dan at MacDill

Mature Brown Pelican by Dan at MacDill AFB

Great White Pelican, Pink-backed Pelican, Spot-billed Pelican, Dalmatian Pelican, Australian Pelican, American White Pelican, Brown Pelican, and the Peruvian Pelican.

Singing Bird (Woodstock) and Snoopy

Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons) singing ©nebirdsplus

Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons) singing ©nebirdsplus

This time of the year, as Spring arrives, the birds like to sing. Woodstock is no different, even if he is only a cartoon bird.

Snoopy and Woodstock Singing

Even dogs like to sing:

Singing Dog Sign LPZ by Lee

Singing Dog Sign LPZ by Lee

Singing Dogs at Lowry Pk Zoo

Singing Dogs at Lowry Pk Zoo

“The flowers appear on the earth; the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land;” (Song of Solomon 2:12 KJV)

Sing, O heavens; and be joyful, O earth; and break forth into singing, O mountains: for the LORD hath comforted his people, and will have mercy upon his afflicted.” (Isaiah 49:13 KJV)

Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea) Neal Addy Gallery

Green Birds of March

“And Jesus said unto him, Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head.” (Luke 9:58 KJV)

Wordless Birds

Also see: Happy Green Day

 

An Apology, Plus Much Work At Hand

Bald Eagle Lowry Park Zoo 12-31-15 by Lee

An apology to those of our readers who have encountered a “404 Page Not Found” error. For some reason, there are many broken links on this Blog. I have been noticing them lately, especially links to photos. Yikes!! There are hundreds of them. There is no clue as to where they flew off to. Most of them are links to bird photos. The birds must have just flown the coop. :)  [Maybe Hurricane Irma blew them away.]

“And out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air; and brought them unto Adam to see what he would call them: and whatsoever Adam called every living creature, that was the name thereof.” (Genesis 2:19 KJV)

Actually, this is going to take much time working behind the scenes to replace the photos, once the broken “links” are discovered. There is a program online to scan your pages for missing links. As many of you know, we have tried to find a photo of all the living birds the Lord created. With over 10,600 birds, it has been a challenge finding these photos so that readers can click the links to see that particular bird.

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) Flying by Aesthetic Photos

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) Flying by Aesthetic Photos

That program scanned just the Accipitridae – Kites, Hawks and Eagles page and found 111 broken links. There are 256 birds in that Family. It will take hours just to fix THAT page. Pray that not every Family of birds are missing photos. Many other pages link to the same bird. The task is daunting, but, Lord Willing, the photo links can be repaired in a reasonable time period.

“Knowing this, that the trying of your faith worketh patience. But let patience have her perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing. If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him. But let him ask in faith, nothing wavering. For he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea driven with the wind and tossed.” (James 1:3-6 KJV)

*** If you encounter a “404 Page Not Found” or another type of problem, please either leave a comment on that page or post, or contact me at Lee@Leesbird.com to leave a note.***

Your help will be greatly appreciated.

P.S. As of last week, the Master of Christian Education [M.CEd.] degree I have been working on was finally finished!!! Yeah!! Not bad for a 74-year-old. :) The Lord is Gracious! The degree was taken online from the School of Biblical Apologetics – Institute for Creation Research. I highly recommend considering taking courses from I.C.R. More about this in another post. [I only mentioned finishing because I’ll have more time to work on these broken links.]

Stay Tuned!!

Avian Kinds on the Ark – Introduction

Ark Encounter During Construction

Ark Encounter During Construction

You shall take with you seven each of every clean animal, a male and his female; two each of animals that are unclean, a male and his female; also seven each of birds of the air, male and female, to keep the species alive on the face of all the earth. (Genesis 7:2-3 NKJV)

Today in Williamstown, Kentucky, they had the Grand Opening of the Ark Encounter. The building of the Ark Encounter was mentioned in Birds of the Bible – Foundation – The Ark. Now, it is open and we are looking forward to the opportunity to go see this modern day, full sized Ark. It’s about 900 miles from where we live, but it is definitely on my “bucket list.”

What I want to do, in a series of articles, is to introduce the Avian Kinds, Bird kinds, that are thought to be on board. An article, An Initial Estimate of Avian Ark Kinds, appeared on Nov. 27, 2013. It was written by Dr. Jean Lightner. Here is her abstract from that article.

Creationists recognize that animals were created according to their kinds, but there has been no comprehensive list of what those kinds are. As part of the Answers in Genesis Ark Encounter project, research was initiated in an attempt to more clearly identify and enumerate vertebrate kinds that were present on the Ark. In this paper, using methods previously described, 196 putative bird kinds are identified. Due to the limited information available and the fact that avian taxonomic classifications shift, this should be considered only a rough estimate.

I bolded the “196 putative bird kinds are identified” because that is what these articles are going to be about. According to I. O. C., the naming list that this site uses, there are 239 Families. On the Birds of the World family page, you will see this:

Lee’s Birds of the World, based on the IOC World Bird List 6.2 contains 10,637 extant species (and 154 extinct species)  classified in 40 Orders,  239 Families (plus 2 Incertae Sedis) and 2289 Genera and 20,490 Subspecies.

If my math is correct, 239 minus 196, equals 43. Okay, where did those 43 extra families come from? That is what this series is going to try to find out. (Not Today)

Ark Encounter - First Look, By TV station

Ark Encounter – First Look, By TV station

STAY TUNED!!

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Birds of the Bible – Foundation – The Ark

An Initial Estimate of Avian Ark Kinds

Grand Opening of the Ark Encounter

Birds of the World

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2014 in Review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 220,000 times in 2014. If it were an exhibit at the Louvre Museum, it would take about 9 days for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Thank you for all your visits to this blog during 2014. This is encouraging and keeps us motivated to “keep on keeping on.” May we all have a great 2015!

“That I may publish with the voice of thanksgiving, and tell of all thy wondrous works. (Psalms 26:7 KJV)

Lord Bless You In 2015!

Happy New Year!

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Birds – The Color That Only God Can Do

Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata) by

Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata) by Dan

Great are the works of the LORD, studied by all who delight in them. (Psalms 111:2 ESV)

Here is a neat blog worth looking at to see all the beautiful color that God put in Birds.

via Birds.

Enjoy the beauty of these birds.

Wordless Birds

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This is by N7QVC’s Christian Blog.

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Why Use The Birds of the World?

Green-billed Toucan (Ramphastos dicolorus) ©WikiC

Green-billed Toucan (Ramphastos dicolorus) ©WikiC

The list of all the Birds of the World are updated about every four months. Which we try to keep up with their (I.O.C.) newest lists.

You are probably wondering why you would need it. Let me share some things about it and then give you some ideas how it my be handy for one of your school projects.

The I.O.C. is actually the International Ornithological Committee. “Ornithological” basically means those who study birds or bird related. They maintain a list of all the birds around the world. They set standards of how to name them, what scientific classification to place the birds in, and divide them into Orders and Families, etc.

They are needed because we may call a bird by one name, yet someone in a different country or area may call it by a different name. They realize that those two names belong to the same bird. It is a very hard task to keep track of all those 10,000 plus birds, but that is what they try to do.

They give every bird an English name as a standard. Then they also want every one to spell the words the same. For instance, some people spell the “Grey” or “Gray” to mean the same color. To keep things simple, all the birds are spelled as “Grey.” That is just one example.

There are committees all over the world working on the birds of the area they live in, then those committees get together to combine all the list to make one big list. That is what was just updated.

On our Birds of the World section, you will find the birds listed by Orders (40 main classifications), then by Families (240 groups of closely related birds). The reason all of that is not duplicated here would be very time-consuming. There are hundreds of pages and thousands of photos on that site.

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) by Dan

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) by Dan

Projects for school or your own information:

You know the name of a bird’s name, but need to find  the Species name,  Go to the Species Index to find these choices:

If you know that it called Madagascan something, go to the First Name of Bird  index and choose the “M” page

If you know it is a Duck, go to the Last Name of Bird  index and choose the “D – Last Name” page.

The Families have four indexes to help you find the Families of birds.

When you find your bird in the right family, almost every bird has a link to a photo or video.

I will share more tips on how to use those indexes in another article.

Another reason is because we believe the Lord created all the beautiful birds and He should get all the credit.

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. (Genesis 1:1 NKJV)

So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. (Genesis 1:21 NKJV)

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Vol. 2, No. 4 – The Wood Pewee

Wood Pewee of Birds Illustrated by Color Photography, 1897

Wood Pewee of Birds Illustrated by Color Photography, 1897

Eastern Pewee’s Twilight Song (Though this bird sings throughout the day, listen for its ballads before dawn’s light and well after sunset when this activity peaks. WhatBird) by Todd Wilson – xeno-canto

From col. Chi. Acad. Sciences. Copyrighted by
Nature Study Pub. Co., 1897, Chicago.

THE WOOD PEWEE.

The listening Dryads hushed the woods;
The boughs were thick, and thin and few
The golden ribbons fluttering through;
Their sun-embroidered leafy hoods
The lindens lifted to the blue;
Only a little forest-brook
The farthest hem of silence shook;
When in the hollow shades I heard—
Was it a spirit or a bird?
Or, strayed from Eden, desolate,
Some Peri calling to her mate,
Whom nevermore her mate would cheer?
“Pe-ri! Pe-ri! Peer!”


To trace it in its green retreat
I sought among the boughs in vain;
And followed still the wandering strain
So melancholy and so sweet,
The dim-eyed violets yearned with pain.


Long drawn and clear its closes were—
As if the hand of Music through
The sombre robe of Silence drew
A thread of golden gossamer;
So pure a flute the fairy blue.
Like beggared princes of the wood,
In silver rags the birches stood;
The hemlocks, lordly counselors,
Were dumb; the sturdy servitors,
In beechen jackets patched and gray,
Seemed waiting spellbound all the day
That low, entrancing note to hear—
“Pe-wee! Pe-wee! Peer!”


“Dear bird,” I said, “what is thy name?”
And thrice the mournful answer came,
So faint and far, and yet so near,
“Pe-wee! Pe-wee! Peer!”
—J. T. Trowbridge.

Eastern Wood Pewee (Contopus virens) by Raymond Barlow

Eastern Wood Pewee (Contopus virens) by Raymond Barlow

THE WOOD PEWEE.

I am called the Wood Pewee, but I don’t always stay in the woods. If you have an orchard or a nice garden, you will hear me singing there in June.

People think I am not a happy bird, because my song seems so sad. They are very much mistaken. I am just as happy as any other little fellow dressed in feathers, and can flirt and flutter with the best of them.

Pewee! Pewee! Peer!

That is my song, and my mate thinks it is beautiful. She is never far away, and always comes at my call.

Always, did I say?

No; one day, when we were busy building our nest—which is very pretty, almost as dainty as that of our neighbor the Humming Bird—she flew away to quite a distance to find some soft lining-stuff on which to lay her eggs. I had been fetching and carrying all day the lichens to put round the nest, which was hidden among the thick leaves on the bough of a tree, and was resting by the side of it.

Pewee! Pewee! Peer!

“She will hear that,” thought I, and again I sang it as loud as I could.

“I’ll bring that fellow down, too,” said a boy, who surely had never heard anything about our happy, innocent lives, and as I peered down at him, he flung a large stone, which struck the bough on which I sat. Oh, how frightened I was, and how quickly I flew away!

“He has killed my little mate,” I thought. Still, I called in my plaintive way, Pewee! Pewee! Peer!

A faint, low cry led me to the foot of a large tree, and there on the ground lay my mate, struggling to rise and fly to me.

“I think my wing is broken,” she sobbed. “Oh, that wicked, wicked boy!”

I petted her with my broad, flat beak, and after a while she was able to fly with me to our nest; but it was days and days before she was out of pain. I am sure if that boy sees my story in Birds, he will never give such an innocentlittle creature misery again.

I dress plainly, in a coat of olive and brown, and they do say my manners are stiff and abrupt.

But my voice is very sweet, and there is something about it which makes people say: “Dear little bird, sad little bird! what may your name be?”

Then I answer:

Pewee! Pewee! Peer!


THE WOOD PEWEE.

LTHOUGH one of the most abundant species, common all over the United States, the retiring habits, plainness of dress, and quiet manners of this little bird have caused it to be comparatively little known. Dr. Brewer says that if noticed at all, it is generally confounded with the common Pewee, or Phoebe bird, though a little observation is sufficient to show how very distinct they are. The Wood Pewee will sit almost motionless for many minutes in an erect position, on some dead twig or other prominent perch, patiently watching for its insect prey. While its position is apparently so fixed, however, its eyes are constantly on the alert, and close watching will show that the bird now and then turns its head as its glance follows the course of some distant insect, while anon the feathers of the crown are raised, so as to form a sort of blunt pyramidal crest. This sentinel-like attitude of the Wood Pewee is in marked contrast to the restless motion of the Phoebe, who, even if perched, keeps its tail constantly in motion, while the bird itself seldom remains long in a fixed position. The notes of the two species (see August Birds) are as different as their habits, those of the Wood Pewee being peculiarly plaintive—a sort of wailing pe-e-e-e-i, wee, the first syllable emphasized and long drawn out, and the tone, a clear, plaintive, wiry whistle, strikingly different from the cheerful, emphatic notes of the true Pewee.

The Wood Pewee, like all of its family, is an expert catcher of insects, even the most minute, and has a remarkably quick perception of their near presence, even when the light of day has nearly gone and in the deep gloom of the thick woods. Dr. Brewer describes it as taking its station at the end of a low dead limb, from which it darts out in quest of insects, sometimes for a single individual, which it seizes with a sharp snap of its bill; and, frequently meeting insect after insect, it keeps up a constant snapping sound as it passes on, and finally returns to its post to resume its watch. While watching it occasionally twitters, with a quivering movement of the head and tail, uttering a feeble call-note, sounding like pee-e.

The nest of the Wood Pewee, which is always “saddled” and securely attached to a rather stout branch, usually lichen-covered, is said to be one of the most elegant examples of bird architecture. From beneath it so much resembles a natural portion of the limb, but for its betrayal by the owner, it would seldom be discovered. It is saucer-shaped, with thick walls, and the whole exterior is a beautiful “mosaic” of green, gray, and glaucous lichen. The eggs are a rich delicate cream color, ornamented by a “wreath” round the larger end of madder-brown, purple, and lilac spots.

The Wood Pewee has many admirers, a more interesting creature to watch while feeding being hard to imagine. Often you will find him in the parks. Sitting in some quiet, shady spot, if you wait, he will soon show himself as he darts from the fence post not far away, to return to it time after time with, possibly, the very insect that has been buzzing about your face and made you miserable. His movements are so quick that even the fly cannot elude him.

And to some he is pleasant as a companion. One who loves birds once saw this Flycatcher flying in a circle and repeating breathlessly his emphatic chebec. “He sang on the wing, and I have never heard notes which seemed more expressive of happiness.”

Summary:

WOOD PEWEE.Contopus Virens.

Range—Eastern North America; breeds from Florida to Newfoundland; winters in Central America.

Nest—Compact and symmetrical, of fine grasses, rootlets and moss, thickly covered with lichens, saddled on a limb, twenty to forty feet up.

Eggs—Three or four, white, with a wreath of distinct and obscure markings about the larger end.


Western Wood Pewee (Contopus sordidulus) by Michael Woodruff

Western Wood Pewee (Contopus sordidulus) by Michael Woodruff

Western Wood Pewee by Scott Olmstead – xeno-canto

Lee’s Addition:

He who heeds the word wisely will find good, And whoever trusts in the LORD, happy is he. (Proverbs 16:20 NKJV)

Both the Eastern and Western Wood Pewee belong to the Tyrannidae – Tyrant Flycatchers Family. There are only 2 Wood Pewees and 12 Pewees in the family. If you click through their photos, you will see that they are just plain little birds, but mighty important to the Lord. Whether a Pewee or a Sparrow:

Are not two sparrows sold for a copper coin? And not one of them falls to the ground apart from your Father’s will. (Matthew 10:29 NKJV)

The Eastern Wood Pewee (Contopus virens) is a small tyrant flycatcher from North America. This bird and the Western Wood Pewee (C. sordidulus) were formerly considered to be a single species. The two species are virtually identical in appearance, and can be distinguished most easily by their calls.

The Western Wood Pewee (Contopus sordidulus) is a small tyrant flycatcher. Adults are gray-olive on the upperparts with light underparts, washed with olive on the breast. They have two wing bars and a dark bill with yellow at the base of the lower mandible. This bird is very similar in appearance to the Eastern Wood Pewee; the two birds were formerly considered to be one species. The call of C. sordidulus is a loud buzzy peeer; the song consists of three rapid descending tsees ending with a descending peeer. (Wikipedia with editing)
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Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

The above article is an article in the monthly serial for October 1897 “designed to promote Knowledge of Bird-Live.” These include Color Photography, as they call them, today they are drawings. There are at least three Volumes that have been digitized by Project Gutenberg.

To see the whole series of – Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

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(Information from Wikipedia and other internet sources)

Next Article – The Snowflake

The Previous Article – The Warbling Vireo

 

Wordless Birds

Links:

Herons – Color Key to North American Birds, by Frank M. Chapman

Herons

Color Key to North American Birds, by Frank M. Chapman, 2011

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Ardeidae – Herons, Bitterns, Egrets Family

Herons

the stork, the heron of any kind, the hoopoe, and the bat. (Leviticus 11:19 ESV)

All things were made through Him, and without Him nothing was made that was made. (John 1:3 NKJV)

Color Key To North American Birds cover

Bird Images pg_092192. Great White Heron (Ardea occidentalis). Ads. White, no “aigrette” plumes. A white Heron about the size of a Great Blue Heron. What is supposed to be a gray-blue phase of this bird has been called, a bird which resembles No. 194, but has the head and neck whitish.Range.—Southern Florida, Cuba and Jamaica.

196. American Egret (Herodias egretta). L. 41. Ads. White, about 50 straight “aigrette” plumes grow from the back between the wings; legs and feet black. Ads. when not breeding and Yng., the same, but no plumes.Range.—Tropical and temperate America; breeds north to Virginia, southern Illinois, and California; later strays to New Brunswick, Minnesota, and Oregon; winters from southern California and Gulf States southward.

197. Snowy Heron (Egretta candidissima). L. 24. Ads. White, about 50 recurved “aigrette” plumes grow from back between the wings; legs black, feet yellow. Ads. when not breeding and Yng. The same, but no plumes.Range.—Tropical and temperate America; bred formerly north to Long Island, southern Illinois and California; now very rare in eastern North America; winters from Gulf States and southern California southward.

194. Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias). L. 45; W. 18.5; B. 5.5; Tar. 7. Ads. Center of crown white, head crested; legs blackish. Yng. Similar, but no crest, crown wholly black, plumage more streaked.Range—Northern South America north to Arctic regions; breeds locally throughout most of North America range; winters from about latitude 42° southward.

194a. Northwest Coast Heron (A. h. fannini). Similar to No. 194 but much darker; upperparts bluish slate black; tarsus shorter, 5.3.Range.—Pacific coast from Vancouver to Sitka.

194b. Ward Heron (A. h. wardi). Similar to No. 194 but whiter below, neck darker; legs olive; larger, L. 52; W. 20; B. 6.5; Tar. 8.Range.—Florida; coast of Texas.

202. Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax nævius). L. 24. Ads. Crown and back greenish black lower back, wings and tail ashy; head with two or three rounded white plumes, except just after breeding season. Yng. Grayish brown streaked with white; below white streaked with blackish; outer webs of primaries, pale rufousNotes. An explosiveqûawk.Range.—Western hemisphere; breeds in North America north to New Brunswick, Quebec, Manitoba, and Oregon; winters from California and Gulf States southward.

203. Yellow-crowned Night Heron (Nyctanassa violaceus). L. 23. Ads. Blue-gray; crown and ear-coverts whitish, rest of head black; scapulars streaked with black; head with two or three rounded, white plumes, except just after nesting season.Yng. Crown black, streaked with whitish; primaries bluish slate, no rufous; back brownish streaked with white; below whitish streaked with blackish.

Range.—Tropical and subtropical America; breeds north to South Carolina, southern Illinois, and Lower California; strays to Massachusetts and Colorado; winters from Gulf States southward.

198. Reddish Egret (Dichromanassa rufescens). L. 29. Two color phases independent of age. Ads. Dark phase, Head and neck rufous; back slate; about 30 “aigrette” plumes. White phase. White, including plumes; tips of primaries sometimes speckled with gray. Yng. Rufous and gray, or white, without plumes.Range.—West Indies and Central America north to coasts of Gulf States, Illinois (rarely), and Lower California.

199. Louisiana Heron (Hydranassa tricolor ruficollis). L. 26. Ads. “Aigrette” plumes, short, dirty gray; rump and belly white; legs blackish. Yng. Head and neck brownish; throat and line down foreneck white; above slaty washed with brownish, rump, and belly white.Range.—West Indies and Central America north to Gulf States, casually to Long Island and Indiana.

200. Little Blue Heron (Florida cœrulea). L. 22. Ads. Head and neck maroon; rest of plumage slaty blue. Yng. White, tips of primaries bluish, legs greenish yellow.Range.—Tropical America and eastern United States; breeds north to Virginia and Illinois, later may stray north as far as Nova Scotia; winters from South Atlantic and Gulf States southward.

201. Little Green Heron (Butorides virescens). L. 17. Smallest of our Herons. Ads. Crown, glossy green-black; throat and line down foreneck buffy; rest of head and neck purplish chestnut; back green washed with bluish gray. Yng. Neck and below streaked with blackish; back-feathers not lengthened; duller. Notes. A rattling oc-oc-oc-oc-oc, a startling scow, and, more rarely, a deep, hollow groan. (Brewster.)Range.—Tropical and temperate North America; breeds from Gulf States north to Nova Scotia and Manitoba; winters from Gulf States southward to northern South America.

201a. Frazar Green Heron (B. v. frazari). Similar to No. 201, but rather larger and darker, neck more purplish, light stripings on throat and foreneck more restricted. (Brewster.)

201b. Anthony Green Heron (B. v. anthonyi). Similar to No. 201, but slightly larger, and paler, light markings of wings, neck, and throat less restricted and whiter. (Mearns.)

Range.—Arid portions of southwestern United States, south into Mexico.


Green Heron – From Color Key

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Birds of the Bible – Names of Birds II

White-tailed Hawk (Buteo albicaudatus) by Daves BirdingPix

White-tailed Hawk (Buteo albicaudatus) by Daves BirdingPix

In the first Names of Birds, I covered the English names of birds. This time the scientific names are going to be looked at, especially the second one. (The first part of the scientific name is the bird’s genus or group) “Birds normally have a scientific name and a common name. The scientific name is usually Latin-bases and is agreed upon by biologists across the world. The common name will vary by region, culture, and language.” (birding.com) No matter what the bird is called in different countries or by different ornithology groups, the scientific name refers to one specific bird. Birds do migrate many miles and spend time in many countries. This naming system helps keep from having the same bird counted numerous times in lists.

As I have worked with the list of the Birds of the World, I have observed similarities in the naming of the birds. For instance, “alba” is the second part of all of these birds–Western Great Egret, White Cockatoo, Sanderling, White Tern, White Wagtail, African Spoonbill, Phoenix Petrel, Western Barn Owl. Could you figure out what color they all are?

White-throated Honeyeater (Melithreptus albogularis) by Tom Tarrant

White-throated Honeyeater (Melithreptus albogularis) by Tom Tarrant

How about “albicauda“–White-tailed Shrike-Tyrant, White-tailed Blue Flycatcher, White-tailed Lark, White-tailed Hawk? Or “albogularis“–White-throated Jacamar, Rufous-banded Honeyeater, White-throated Pewee, White-throated Canary, White-throated Laughingthrush, White-throated Screech Owl, White-throated Honeyeater, White-throated Francolin, White-throated Caracara, White-throated Treerunner, White-spotted Fantail, White-throated Seedeater, White-throated Kingbird, White-chested White-eye? That last group was not all “white-throated,” in name, but they have white throats.

We know that Adam named the birds and other critters as the Scripture tells us:

Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name. So Adam gave names to all cattle, to the birds of the air, and to every beast of the field. But for Adam there was not found a helper comparable to him. (Genesis 2:19-20 NKJV)

Blue-throated Bee-eater (Merops viridis) by Ray

Blue-throated Bee-eater (Merops viridis) by Ray

Did Adam use scientific names? I doubt it. Adam didn’t have to go though all this. Today the ornithologist (those who study birds) use this method of naming along with a common name in whatever language they speak.

Thought you might find it interesting to see some of the species’ second scientific names:
Colors:
albus/alba, white; cf albino, ater/atra, matt black, brachy-, short (Greek), brunne-, brown, caeruleus, blue, canus, grey, chloro-, green or yellow (Greek), cinerea-, grey or ash-coloured; cf cinders, crocus, cyan, blue, erythro-, red (Greek), flava, yellow, fuscus/fusca, dusky, guttatus, speckled or spotted, haema-, blood-red (Greek); cf haemoglobin, leuco-, white (Greek), lineatus, lined or striped, livia, blue-grey, longi-, long, luteus/lutea, yellow, major, greater, mega-, great (Greek), melas, black (Greek); cf melanistic, minor, lesser, niger/nigra, glossy black; cf negro, punctatus, spotted; cf punctuation, pusilla, tiny, rosea, rosy, ruber, red, rufus/rufa, red, striatus/striata, striped, versicolor, many-collored, varied, viridis, green, albogularis – White-throated
Countries:
abyssinicus, africana, americana, angolensis, antarctica,
Characteristics:
cauda, tail, –cephalus, head (Greek), –ceps, capped, headed, cilla, tail, collis, neck,  cristatus, crested, dactyl, finger or toe (Greek), frons, front, i.e. forehead, –gularis, throat, –ops, eye, –opsis, face, ptera, wing (Greek), –rhynchos, bill (Greek), –rostris, bill, torquatus, collared

Names are important and have meaning. Christ was named long before He was born. It was foretold.

Now all this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us. (Matthew 1:22-23 KJV)
After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.  (Matthew 6:9 KJV)
And in his name shall the Gentiles trust. (Matthew 12:21 KJV)
And Jesus came and spake unto them, saying, All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth. Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen.
(Matthew 28:18-20 KJV)

(Some information from Scientific bird names explained and How Do Birds Get Their Names?)
Also see: Story behind the common names of birds

Birds of the Bible – Names of Birds

Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name. So Adam gave names to all cattle, to the birds of the air, and to every beast of the field… (Genesis 2:19-20a NKJV)

Common Kingfisher by Phil Kwong

It would be nice to know which birds Adam named and what he named them. Today, the birds we see around the world are variations from those original bird kinds. The names that they now have are different, but, if Adam were to name the birds living today, do you think he might use these current names on the birds?

Below are some bird names that have caught my attention and you can almost visualize something about them:

A  – Amazon, Antbird, Antpitta, Antshrike, Antvireo, Antwren, Apostlebird, Awlbill
B  – Babbler, Bamboowren, Barbtail, Barbthroat, Bare-eye, Barwing, Baywing, Bee-eater, Bellbird, Berryeater, Berrypecker, Bird-of-paradise, Bishop, Blackbird, Blackcap, Blackeye, Black-headed, Blackstart, Blackthroat, Bleeding-heart, Bluebill, Bluewing, Bluebird, Bluebonnet, Bluetail, Bluethroat, Boatbill, Bowerbird, Brilliant, Bristlebill, Bristlebird, Broadbill, Bronzewing, Brushrunner, Bushbird, Bush-hen

Booted Racket-tail (Ocreatus underwoodii) by Ian

Booted Racket-tail (Ocreatus underwoodii) by Ian

C  – Canvasback, Cardinal, Catbird, Chat, Chatterer, Cicadabird, Comet, Conebill, Cowbird, Creeper, Crestentchest, Crimsonwing, Crossbill, Cuckoo
D  – Darkeye, Darter, Dipper, Dollarbird, Dove
E  – Earthcreeper, Emerald
F  – Fairy, Fairy-bluebird, Fairywren, Fantail, Fieldwren, Figbird, Finfoot, Fireback, Firecrest, Firecrown, Fire-eye, Firefinch, Firetail, Firethroat, Flamecrest, Flatbill, Flicker, Flowerpecker, Flowerpiecer, Flufftail, Flycatcher, Foliage-gleaner, Forktail, Friarbird, Frigatebird, Frogmouth, Fruitcrow, Fruiteater, Fruithunter
G  – Gnatcatcher, Gnatwren, Go-away-bird, Goldcrest, Goldenback, Goldeneye, Goldenthroat, Goldfinch, Grassbird, Grassquit, Grasswren, Greytail, Groundcreeper, Groundpecker, Guineafowl

Carmine BeeEater by Marc at Africaddict

Carmine BeeEater (Merops nubicus or nubicoides) by Marc at Africaddict

H  – Hardhead, Helmetcrest, Helmetshrike, Hermit, Hillstar, Hobby, Honeybird, Honeycreeper, Honeyeater, Honeyguide, Hookbill, Hornbill, Hummingbird
J  – Jewel-babbler, Jewelfront, Junglefowl
K  – Kingbird, Kingfisher, Kite, Knot,
L  – Laughingthrush, Leafbird, Leaftosser, Longbill, Longclaw, Longtail, Lovebird
M  – Marshbird, Metaltail, Mockingbird, Monarch, Morepork, Mountaingem, Mourner, Mousebird, Mudnester
N  – Needletail, Nighthawk, Nunbird, Nutcracker, Nuthatch
O  – Oilbird, Openbill, Ovenbird, Oxpecker, Oystercatcher
P  – Palmchat, Palmcreeper, Pewee, Pilotbird, Pintail, Prickletail, Puffback, Puffbird, Puffleg
R  – Racket-tail, Rail, Razorbill, Recurvebill, Redhead, Redwing, Rockfinch, Rockfowl, Rockjumper, Rockrunner, Rockwarbler, Rockwren, Roller, Rushbird
S  – Sabrewing, Saddleback, Sanderling, Sandgrouse, Sandpiper, Sapphire, Sapphirewing, Sapsucker, Screamer, Screech, Scrubbird, Scrubfowl, Scrubtit, Scrubwren, Secretarybird, Seedcracker, Seedeater, Sheathbill, Shieldbill, Shoebill, Shortwing, Shoveler, Sicklebill, Silktail, Silverbird, Skimmer, Snowcock, Snowfinch, Softtail, Solitaire, Spadebill, Spatuletail, Spiderhunter, Spinebill, Spinetail, Spoonbill, Standardwing, Starfrontlet, Starthroat, Stilt, Stichbird, Straightbill, Streamcreeper, Streamertail, Stubtail, Sugarbird, Sunangel, Sunbeam, Sunbird, Sunbittern, Sungem, Surfbird, Swift
T  – Tailorbird, Tattler, Thicketbird, Thick-knee, Thistletail, Thornbill, Tinkerbird, Trainbearer, Treecreeper, Treehunter, Treepie, Treerunner, Treeswift, Trembler, Triller, Tropicbird, Trumpeter, Tuftedcheek, Tyrant
U  – Umbrellabird
V  – Violetear, Visorbearer
W  – Wagtail, Wallcreeper, Warbler, Waxbill, Waxwing, Weaver, Weebill, Wheatear, Whipbird, Whistler, White-eye, Whiteface, Whitethroat, Whitetip, Widowbird, Winter, Wiretail, Woodcock, Woodcreeper, Woodhen, Woodhaunter, Woodpecker, Woodstar
Y  – Yellowbrow, Yellowhammer, Yellowlegs, Yellowthroat

The slide show has just some of the Passerines (Song Birds) whose names might have been easy. I’ll save the non-Passerines for later. Tried not to use too many colors because that is also for other blogs.

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See Also:
Bird Name Challenges
Variation within Created Kinds
Species and Kinds
Explaining Diversity within Created Kinds

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