God’s Recipe for the Fiery-throated Hummingbird

Fiery-throated Hummingbird (Panterpe insignis) ©WikiC

The Fiery-throated Hummingbird (Panterpe insignis) is a medium-sized hummingbird which breeds only in the mountains of Costa Rica and western Panama. It is the only member of the genus Panterpe.

This is a common to abundant bird of montane forest canopy above 1400 m, and also occurs in scrub at the woodland edges and clearings.

This bird is 11 cm long and weighs 5.7 g. It has a straight black bill and dusky feet.

Fiery-throated Hummingbird (Panterpe insignis) by Judd Patterson

Fiery-throated Hummingbird (Panterpe insignis) by Judd Patterson

The adult fiery-throated hummingbird has shiny green body plumage, a blue tail, and a white spot behind the eye. It often looks dark, but when the light catches it at the right angle, it shows a brilliant blue crown, yellow-bordered bright orange throat, and violet-blue chest patch. The sexes are similar, but young birds have rufous fringes to the head plumage. The call is a high-pitched twittering.

Fiery-throated Hummingbird in Flight ©Raymond Barlow

The female fiery-throated hummingbird is entirely responsible for nest building and incubation. She lays two white eggs in a bulky plant-fibre cup nest 2–4 m high at the end of a descending bamboo stem or on a rootlet under a bank. Incubation takes 15–19 days, and fledging another 20-26.

Fiery-throated Hummingbird (Panterpe insignis) Little color from side ©WikiC

The food of this species is nectar, taken from a variety of small flowers, including epiphytic Ericaceae and bromeliads. Like other hummingbirds it also takes small insects as an essential source of protein. Male fiery-throated hummingbirds defend flowers and scrubs in their feeding territories, and are dominant over most other hummingbirds. They will, however, allow females to share their food resources.

“In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.” (Genesis 1:1 KJV)

God’s Good Recipe For Birds

The Family Circus Artist surely came up with a great truth in this one. God’s “recipe” was Creation. His [God’s] wisdom is evident in all of his creation, especially the birds.

“For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.” (Romans 8:22 NASB)

What would this beautiful Fiery-throated Hummer look like if it weren’t under the curse of man’s sin?


Fiery-throated Hummingbird Panterpe insignis – Internet Bird Collection

Fiery-throated Hummingbird – Wikipedia

Fiery-throated Hummingbird – Neotropical Birds

 

 

God’s Recipe for the Brown-throated Wattle-eye

Brown-throated Wattle-eye (Platysteira cyanea) Male ©WikiC

“In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.” (Genesis 1:1 KJV)

The Family Circus Artist surely came up with a great truth in this one. God’s “recipe” was Creation. His [God’s] wisdom is evident in all of his creation, especially the birds.

Family Circus – God’s good recipe

Here is the Brown-throated Wattle-eye that is a beauty.

Brown-throated Wattle-eye (Platysteira cyanea) Male ©Flickr Isidro Vila Verde

The Brown-throated Wattle-eye (Platysteira cyanea), also known as the common wattle-eye or scarlet-spectacled wattle-eye, is a small, insectivorous passerine bird. The wattle-eyes were previously classed as a subfamily of the Old World flycatcher family Muscicapidae, but are now usually separated from that group.

This species breeds in west, central and northeast tropical Africa. This common species is found in secondary forest and other woodland areas, including gardens. The eggs are laid in a small neat lichen and cobweb cup low in a tree or bush.

The adult brown-throated wattle-eye is a stout bird about 14 cm (5.5 in) long. The breeding male has glossy black upperparts, and white underparts with a neat black breast band. There is a strong white wingbar, and fleshy red wattles above the eye.

Brown-throated Wattle-eye (Platysteira cyanea) Male ©Flickr Allan Hopkins

The females are grey-black above, and also have the white wing bar and red wattles. There is a small patch of white below the bill, and the throat and breast are maroon, separated from the white belly by the black breast band. Young males are washed-out, greyer versions of the female.

Black-throated Wattle-eye (Platysteira peltata) Female ©Flickr Johann du Preez

These active insect-eating birds are found in pairs or small groups. The ringing call of the brown-throated wattle-eye is a very characteristic six note doo-dd-dum-di-do-do.

“Remember now thy Creator in the days of thy youth,” (Ecclesiastes 12:1aKJV)

*** Survey – Should this become a series to introduce some of the special Avian Wonders from the Lord? ***