Birds Who Build Pyramids by Creation Moments

BIRDS WHO BUILD PYRAMIDS

Listen and or Watch


Job 12:7″But ask now the beasts, and they shall teach thee; and the fowls of the air, and they shall tell thee…”

Bee-eaters are birds whose way of life and behavior are both intelligent and unusual. There are 24 species of bee-eaters.
Birds Who Build Pyramids
Bee-eaters make their living catching and eating bees and wasps with stingers. The poison in many of these stinging insects is powerful enough to kill bee-eaters, but the birds are not only skilled at avoiding stings, they know how to remove the poison from the bee when they eat it. Having captured a bee or wasp, a bee-eater will take it to a branch where he will pound its head and rub its stinging end until all of the poison has been removed from the insect’s venom sac. Once the poison is removed, the bee-eater enjoys lunch.

Bee-eaters are described as lively and sociable. You seldom see one roosting all by itself. And when the weather is cool, bee-eaters huddle together to keep each other warm. There are even reports that bee-eaters will roost on each other’s backs, forming a feathered pyramid made out of birds.

Bee-eaters Huddled Together – from email

Now, it’s possible that bee-eaters figured out that they were warmer when huddled together, although even that much intelligence had to come from their Creator. But how could bee-eaters simply “discover” how to detoxify bees? If this ability evolved by trial and error, there would probably be no descendants of the first bee-eaters around today. Obviously, this dangerous behavior would not favor survival. This makes the bee-eater one of God’s own arguments against evolution!

Southern Carmine Bee-eater (Merops nubicus) by Marc at Africaddict

Southern Carmine Bee-eater (Merops nubicus) by Marc at Africaddict

Prayer: “Lord, not only does Your wisdom surround us, but You have so generously given intelligence and wisdom to so many of Your creatures. I thank You for the wonder Your handiwork inspires. In Jesus’ Name. Amen.

Notes:
Clanbake. Natural History, Mar. 1990. p. 94. Photo: A male Blue-throated Bee-eater presents his mate with a captured insect. Photo taken by Lip Kee Yap and licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Used with permission of Creation Moments

 

Most Adorable Eaglet from Decorah Eagles

“Who satisfieth thy mouth with good things; so that thy youth is renewed like the eagle’s.” (Psalms 103:5 KJV)

“Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name.” (Genesis 2:19 NKJV)

What an interesting video! Enjoy!

Bald Eagles Protecting Their Young In Snowstorm

“To the Chief Musician. Set to “Do Not Destroy.” a Michtam of David When He Fled from Saul into the Cave. Be merciful to me, O God, be merciful to me! For my soul trusts in You; And in the shadow of Your wings I will make my refuge, Until these calamities have passed by. I will cry out to God Most High, To God who performs all things for me.” (Psalms 57:1-2 NKJV)

“He shall cover you with His feathers, And under His wings you shall take refuge; His truth shall be your shield and buckler. ” (Psalms 91:4 NKJV)

Shared from the Decorah Eagles YouTube Page

“DECORAH EAGLES & EAGLETS IOWA USA 🐣🐣🐣 After spending days enduring severe, horrendous weather conditions, protecting their three precious eaglets from the gale force winds, wet and freezing cold, Mom and Dad Eagle warm our hearts with this beautiful moment… a family moment of love, care, protection and devotion in the wild ♥ amazing nature!”

Trust you enjoy this as much as I did!

Faithful Are The Wounds of a Friend

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FAITHFUL ARE THE WOUNDS

OF A FRIEND

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Faithful are the wounds of a friend, But the kisses of an enemy are deceitful.” (Proverbs 27:6 NKJV)

Sometimes our friends accidentally step on us, but we do not have to get upset.

This video was taken at Gatorland on a cold morning. They were trying to share body heat. Every time they settled down, one decided to move and then the whole pile rearranged themselves again. Not birds, but thought you might enjoy this.

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More Daily Devotionals

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Bible Birds – Great Grey Owl

This video is great. If you do not chuckle, then you should. After the video, we will share some information about this Owl.

“The little owl, and the great owl, and the swan,” (Deuteronomy 14:16 KJV)

This Great Grey Owl is a “great owl” for sure. Love those eyes. “The Great Grey Owl or Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) is a very large owl, documented as the world’s largest species of owl by length. It is distributed across the Northern Hemisphere, and it is the only species in the Strix genus found in both Eastern and Western Hemispheres. In some areas it is also called Phantom of the North, cinereous owl, spectral owl, Lapland owl, spruce owl, bearded owl, and sooty owl.’

“Adults have a large rounded head with a grey face and yellow eyes with darker circles around them. The underparts are light with dark streaks; the upper parts are grey with pale bars. This owl does not have ear tufts and has the largest facial disc of any raptor. There is a white collar or “bow tie” just below the beak. The long tail tapers to a rounded end.”

Great Grey Owl (Strix nebulosa) WikiC

Great Grey Owl (Strix nebulosa) WikiC

“In terms of length, the great grey owl is believed to exceed the Eurasian eagle-owl and the Blakiston’s fish owl as the world’s largest owl. The great grey is outweighed by those two species as well as several others, including most of the Bubo genus. Much of its size is deceptive, since this species’ fluffy feathers, large head and the longest tail of any extant owl obscure a body lighter than that of most other large owls. The length ranges from 61 to 84 cm (24 to 33 in), averaging 72 cm (28 in) for females and 67 cm (26 in) for males. The wingspan can exceed 152 cm (5 ft 0 in), but averages 142 cm (4 ft 8 in) for females and 140 cm (4 ft 7 in) for males. The adult weight ranges from 580 to 1,900 g (1.28 to 4.19 lb), averaging 1,290 g (2.84 lb) for females and 1,000 g (2.2 lb) for males. The males are usually smaller than females, as with most owl species.”

“They breed in North America from as far east as Quebec to the Pacific coast and Alaska, and from Finland and Estonia across northern Asia. They are permanent residents, although northerly populations may move south and southeast when food is scarce. In Europe, they are found breeding in Norway and Sweden and more numerously through Finland and Russia. Even though the species occurs in Europe, the first great grey owl recognized by science was found in Canada in the late 18th century.”

Information from Wikipedia with editing. See more about them: Great Grey Owl – Wikipedia

The Video was from Paul Dinning Wildlife.

The Owl is a bird that is mentioned in the Bible 10 times. [Leviticus 11:16, 17; Deuteronomy 14:15, 16; Psalm 102:6; Isaiah 34:11, 14, 15]

See:

Wordless Toucan

Plumed (Grass) Whistling Ducks – Video

Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the LORD for ever.
(Psalms 23:6 KJV)

Bellamoonnature produced this.

What he posted:

AMAZING FAMILY OF 18 •❥ Feeling excited, the first time I noticed these ducklings cuddled together in the grass… I thought maybe there were 8 or 9 fluffy, beautiful ducklings. When they all popped up to the count of (16) I was amazed… I’d never seen so many in one clutch. They quickly trusted me, therefore becoming part of my treasured extended feathered family.

Every afternoon, I would find them huddled together under the trees, waiting for their daily delivery of wild bird mix, that I was thrilled to deliver. It was truly heartening to see them all survive, and fly around our lakes as one. Eventually, the whistler ducks leave, before returning about six months later. They have all just returned to our local lakes… I wonder if my precious ‘family of 18’ are amongst them?

♥ GRASS WHISTLING DUCK •❥ The plumed whistling duck also called the grass whistling duck, with it’s loud sibilant whistle… is one of two whistling or tree ducks found in Australia. During the day the plumed Whistling-Duck congregates in large numbers with other waterfowl, on the margins of lagoons, swamps and mangrove creeks, for preening and sleeping. At night they fly out, often quite long distances, to feed on grasslands.

Music: Arms of Heaven By Aakash Gandhi

Free to use music from the YouTube Audio Library

We have seen the Plumed Whistling Duck at Zoo Miami. Pretty birds.

Plumed Whistling Duck (Dendrocygna eytoni) by Lee Zoo Miami

Bible Birds – Black Swans by Bellamoonnature

Black Swan by Lee

Black Swan by Lee

Bellamoon sent a link to some of his videos. The one below of the Black Swans and their family is super. He previously gave me permission to use his music for videos I put together, but this is better than anything I could ever do.

Several verses came to mind about “under his wings” while watching this:

Keep me as the apple of the eye, hide me under the shadow of thy wings, (Psalms 17:8 KJV)

How excellent is thy lovingkindness, O God! therefore the children of men put their trust under the shadow of thy wings. (Psalms 36:7 KJV)

He shall cover thee with his feathers, and under his wings shalt thou trust: his truth shall be thy shield and buckler. (Psalms 91:4 KJV)

He shall cover thee with his feathers, and under his wings shalt thou trust: his truth shall be thy shield and buckler. (Psalms 91:4 KJV)

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, which killest the prophets, and stonest them that are sent unto thee; how often would I have gathered thy children together, as a hen doth gather her brood under her wings, and ye would not! (Luke 13:34 KJV)

There are verses that help us think about how kind these swans are to their young:

For thy lovingkindness is before mine eyes: and I have walked in thy truth. (Psalms 26:3 KJV)

Withhold not thou thy tender mercies from me, O LORD: let thy lovingkindness and thy truth continually preserve me. (Psalms 40:11 KJV)

Whoso is wise, and will observe these things, even they shall understand the lovingkindness of the LORD. (Psalms 107:43 KJV)

Links:

Bellamoonnature 

Bible Birds – Swans

Birds of the Bible – Swans

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Birds Vol 1 #6 – The Ruffed Grouse

Ruffed Grous for Birds Illustrated by Color Photography, 1897

Ruffed Grous for Birds Illustrated by Color Photography, 1897, From col. F. M. Woodruff

Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

Vol 1. June, 1897 No. 6

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THE RUFFED GROUSE.

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HE Ruffed Grouse, which is called Partridge in New England and Pheasant in the Middle and Southern States, is the true Grouse, while Bob White is the real Partridge. It is unfortunate that they continue to be confounded. The fine picture of his grouseship, however, which we here present should go far to make clear the difference between them.

The range of the Ruffed Grouse is eastern United States, south to North Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, and Arkansas. They hatch in April, the young immediately leaving the nest with the mother. When they hear the mother’s warning note the little ones dive under leaves and bushes, while she leads the pursuer off in an opposite direction. Building the nest and sitting upon the eggs constitute the duties of the female, the males during this interesting season keeping separate, not rejoining their mates until the young are hatched, when they begin to roam as a family.

Like the Turkey, the Ruffed Grouse has a habit of pluming and strutting, and also makes the drumming noise which has caused so much discussion. This noise “is a hollow vibrating sound, beginning softly and increasing as if a small rubber ball were dropped slowly and then rapidly bounced on a drum.” While drumming the bird contrives to make himself invisible, and if seen it is difficult to get the slightest clue to the manner in which the sound is produced. And observers say that it beats with its wings on a log, that it raises its wings and strikes their edges above its back, that it claps them against its sides like a crowing rooster, and that it beats the air. The writer has seen a grouse drum, appearing to strike its wings together over its back. But there is much difference of opinion on the subject, and young observers may settle the question for themselves. When preparing to drum he seems fidgety and nervous and his sides are inflated. Letting his wings droop, he flaps them so fast that they make one continuous humming sound. In this peculiar way he calls his mate, and while he is still drumming, the hen bird may appear, coming slyly from the leaves.

The nest is on the ground, made by the female of dry leaves and a few feathers plucked from her own breast. In this slight structure she lays ten or twelve cream-colored eggs, specked with brown.

The eyes of the Grouse are of great depth and softness, with deep expanding pupils and golden brown iris.

Coming suddenly upon a young brood squatted with their mother near a roadside in the woods, an observer first knew of their presence by the old bird flying directly in his face, and then tumbling about at his feet with frantic signs of distress and lameness. In the meantime the little ones scattered in every direction and were not to be found. As soon as the parent was satisfied of their safety, she flew a short distance and he soon heard her clucking call to them to come to her again. It was surprising how quickly they reached her side, seeming to pop up as from holes in the ground.

THE RUFFED GROUSE.

At first sight most of you will think this is a turkey. Well, it does look very much like one. He spreads his tail feathers, puffs himself up, and struts about like a turkey. You know by this time what his name is and I think you can easily see why he is called Ruffed.

This proud bird and his mate live with us during the whole year. They are found usually in grassy lands and in woods.

Here they build their rude nest of dried grass, weeds and the like. You will generally find it at the foot of a tree, or along side of an old stump in or near swampy lands.

The Ruffed Grouse has a queer way of calling his mate. He stands on a log or stump, puffed up like a turkey—just as you see him in the picture. Then he struts about for a time just as you have seen a turkey gobbler do. Soon he begins to work his wings—slowly at first, but faster and faster, until it sounds like the beating of a drum.

His mate usually answers his call by coming. They set up housekeeping and build their rude nest which holds from eight to fourteen eggs. As soon as the young are hatched they can run about and find their own food. So you see they are not much bother to their parents. When they are a week old they can fly. The young usually stay with their parents until next Spring. Then they start out and find mates for themselves.

I said at the first that the Ruffed Grouse stay with us all the year. In the winter, when it is very cold, they burrow into a snowdrift to pass the night. During the summer they always roost all night.


Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) by Kent Nickel

Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) by Kent Nickel

Lee’s Addition:

If a bird’s nest happens to be before you along the way, in any tree or on the ground, with young ones or eggs, with the mother sitting on the young or on the eggs, you shall not take the mother with the young; you shall surely let the mother go, and take the young for yourself, that it may be well with you and that you may prolong your days. (Deuteronomy 22:6-7 NKJV)

Here is another one of God’s neat birds. The Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) is a medium-sized grouse occurring in forests from the Appalachian Mountains across Canada to Alaska. It is non-migratory. The Ruffed Grouse is frequently referred to as a “partridge”. This is technically wrong—partridges are unrelated phasianids, and in hunting may lead to confusion with the Grey Partridge, it is a bird of woodlands, not open areas. It is a very popular game bird.

The Ruffed Grouse is also the state bird of Pennsylvania.

Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) by Raymond Barlow

Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) by Raymond Barlow

Ruffed Grouse look like chickens in appearance. They are medium to large with a thick body with a small crest on their head. When they fly their wings are rounded. Their coloration works very well to blend them with their habitat. The Lord has provided that protection for them. “One of the interesting ruffed grouse facts is that during winter, these birds develop a web-like structure that joins their toes, so that they can walk easily on snow.” (Buzzle.com)

The Ruffed Grouse is one of 182 members of the Phasianidae – Pheasants, Fowls and Allies Family. Other birds that are similar are found in the Galliformes Order.

Here is a video of a Ruffed Grouse drumming from YouTube from TheMusicofNature

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Birds Illustrated by Color Photograhy Vol 1 June, 1897 No 6 - Cover

Birds Illustrated by Color Photograhy Vol 1 June, 1897 No 6 – Cover

Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

The above article is an article in the monthly serial for May 1897 “designed to promote Knowledge of Bird-Live.” These include Color Photography, as they call them, today they are drawings. There are at least three Volumes that have been digitized by Project Gutenberg.

To see the whole series of – Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

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(Information from Wikipedia and other internet sources)

Next Article – The Black and White Creeping Warbler

Previous Article – The Scarlet Tanager

Wordless Birds

Links:

Ruffed Grouse – All About Birds

Ruffed Grouse Facts – Buzzle.com

Ruffed Grouse – Wikipedia

Grouse Facts

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