Woodstock’s Hairdo

Today’s Peanut’s cartoon reminds me of the birds we saw at the Jacksonville Zoo recently. It had rained before and it rained while we were visiting.

Woodstock and Rain

“Poor Woodstock.. When he gets wet, he looks like an English Sheep-Bird!” [In case you can’t read it]

“Who does great things, and unsearchable, Marvelous things without number. He gives rain on the earth, And sends waters on the fields.” (Job 5:9-10 NKJV)

In Where Am I Found? – Abdim’s Stork, the first photo showed the stork still wet. Dan just showed me his photo of the Stork, which definitely shows a wet bird hairdo.

Wet Abdim’s Ibis at Jacksonville Zoo by Dan

My photo of this wet Ibis:

Abdim’s Stork (Ciconia abdimii) -Jacksonville Zoo wet

There were a few others that were not up to their normally sleek appearance.

Another wet avian wonder was the Yellow-billed Stork. He was damp, but not as wet as the Abdim’s Stork.

Yellow-billed Stork (Mycteria ibis) Wet at Jacksonville Zoo

Are you taking a picture of me like this when I am not preened?

Yellow-billed Stork (Mycteria ibis) – Jacksonville Zoo

This is why you see so many birds preening. The Roseate Spoonbill was busy straightening and drying its feathers.

Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja) Preening – Jax Zoo

“Who covers the heavens with clouds, Who prepares rain for the earth, Who makes grass to grow on the mountains. He gives to the beast its food, And to the young ravens that cry.” (Psalms 147:8-9 NKJV)

There were a few others that were not up to their normally sleek appearance.

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Where Am I Found? – Abdim’s Stork

Some of the Other Jacksonville Zoo articles:

Jacksonville Zoo’s Noisy Stork Tree

Marabou Stork Chicks and Inca Tern at Jacksonville Zoo

Birdwatching at the Jacksonville Zoo by Dan’s Pix

Jacksonville Zoo’s Cape Thick-knee

Birds of the Bible – Black-faced Ibis at Jax Zoo by Dan

Waterman Bird Collection – Part II – Petrel & Crow

Leach’s Storm Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) BJU Bird Collection 2018

As promised, in Waterman Bird Collection – Part II, here are the last two birds from that display. The Leach’s Storm Petrel and the Crow will now be introduced. Many of you already have heard of a Crow, but how about a Storm Petrel? Let’s see what we can find out about these avian creations from the Creator.

BJU Bird Collection 2018 Bottom Shelf

The two birds today are the two right hand birds in the Display.

The Leach’s Storm Petrel [at the top] is starting to show a tiny bit of deterioration, but considering it’s over 100 years old, it’s not too much.

“The Leach’s Storm Petrel or Leach’s Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) is a small seabird of the tubenose order. It is named after the British zoologist William Elford Leach. The scientific name is derived from Ancient Greek. Oceanodroma is from okeanos, “ocean” and dromos, “runner”, and leucorhoa is from leukos, “white” and orrhos, “rump”.

“It breeds on inaccessible islands in the colder northern areas of the Atlantic and Pacific. It nests in colonies close to the sea in well concealed areas such as rock crevices, shallow burrows or even logs. It lays a single white egg which often has a faint ring of spots at the large end. This storm petrel is strictly nocturnal at the breeding sites to avoid predation by gulls and skuas, and will even avoid coming to land on clear moonlit nights. The largest colony of Leach’s storm petrels can be found on Baccalieu Island of eastern Canada, an ecological reserve with more than 3 million pairs of the bird.” [Wikipedia with editing]

Fun Fact: “Flies swiftly, erratically, buoyantly with 1 or 2 fast, powerful flaps followed by glides on wings held well above the horizontal and noticeably kinked; sudden changes of direction impart a bounding quality. Flutters less than other storm-petrels.” [Neotropical Birds]

Drinks salt water – Formed By Him – Sea Birds That Drink Seawater, is an interesting article about Tubenose birds.

American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) BJU Bird Collection 2018

The last bird in the part of the collection is a Crow. It wasn’t shown which one exactly, so we are using the American Crow.

“The American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) is a large passerine bird species of the family Corvidae. It is a common bird found throughout much of North America. American crows are the new world counterpart to the carrion crow and the hooded crow. Although the American crow and the hooded crow are very similar in size, structure and behavior, their calls are different. The American crow nevertheless occupies the same role the hooded crow does in Eurasia.”

Florida Fish Crow (Corvus ossifragus) at Lake Morton By Dan’sPix

“From beak to tail, an American crow measures 40–50 cm (16–20 in), almost half of which is tail. Mass varies from about 300 to 600 g (11 to 21 oz). Males tend to be larger than females. The most usual call is CaaW!-CaaW!-CaaW!.’

American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) by Ray

“The American crow is all black, with iridescent feathers. It looks much like other all-black corvids. They can be distinguished from the common raven (C. corax) because American crows are smaller and from the fish crow (C. ossifragus) because American crows do not hunch and fluff their throat feathers when they call, and from the carrion crow (C. corone) by the enunciation of their calls.” [American Crow – Wikipedia]

A Cool Fact from American Crows – All About Birds:

  • Crows sometimes make and use tools. Examples include a captive crow using a cup to carry water over to a bowl of dry mash; shaping a piece of wood and then sticking it into a hole in a fence post in search of food; and breaking off pieces of pine cone to drop on tree climbers near a nest.

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Here are the links to this Series:

Huge Bugs and Critters,

Waterman Bird Collection – Part I.

Waterman Bird Collection – Part II

 

 

 

Waterman Bird Collection – Part II

BJU Bird Collection 2018 Bottom Shelf

The next set of birds from the Waterman Bird Collection at BJU has five specimens. Four of these birds are found in or near water, but the Crow is not really known as a water bird.

This is the bottom shelf display under the Anatidae Family, just above them. That Family was covered in Waterman Bird Collection – Part I. I trust you clicked on the links provided to read more about those avian wonders.

Common Loon (Gavia immer) BJU Bird Collection 2018

Common Loon (Gavia immer) BJU Bird Collection 2018

Our big tall bird is a Common Loon. “The common loon or great northern diver (Gavia immer) is a large member of the loon, or diver, family of birds. Breeding adults have a plumage that includes a broad black head and neck with a greenish, purplish, or bluish sheen, blackish or blackish-grey upperparts, and pure white underparts except some black on the undertail coverts and vent. Non-breeding adults are brownish with a dark neck and head marked with dark grey-brown. Their upperparts are dark brownish-grey with an unclear pattern of squares on the shoulders, and the underparts, lower face, chin, and throat are whitish. The sexes look alike, though males are significantly larger and heavier than females. During the breeding season, they live on lakes and other waterways in Canada, the northern United States (including Alaska), as well as in southern parts of Greenland and Iceland. Small numbers breed on Svalbard and sporadically elsewhere in Arctic Eurasia. Common loons winter on both coasts of the US as far south as Mexico, and on the Atlantic coast of Europe.

Common Loon by Raymond Barlow

Common loons eat a wide range of animal prey including fish, crustaceans, insect larvae, mollusks, and occasionally aquatic plant life. They swallow most of their prey underwater, where it is caught, but some larger items are first brought to the surface.” Common Loon – Wikipedia

Here is just one of the Cool Facts from Common Loon – All About Birds

  • Loons are agile swimmers, but they move pretty fast in the air, too. Migrating loons have been clocked flying at speeds more than 70 mph.

Red-necked Grebe (Podiceps grisegena) BJU Bird Collection 2018

Next to the Loon is a Red-necked Grebe (Podiceps grisegena). “Like all grebes, the Red-necked is a good swimmer, a particularly swift diver, and responds to danger by diving rather than flying. The feet are positioned far back on the body, near the tail, which makes the bird ungainly on land. It dives for fish or picks insects off vegetation; it also swallows its own feathers, possibly to protect the digestive system.” Red-necked Grebes – Wikipedia

Red-necked Grebe (Podiceps grisegena) young on her wing©USFWS

Red-necked Grebe (Podiceps grisegena) young on her wing©USFWS

Here is a Cool Fact from Red-necked Grebe – All About Birds

  • The oldest recorded Red-necked Grebe was at least 11 years old when it was found in Minnesota, the same state where it had been banded.

Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps) BJU Bird Collection 2018

The smaller Grebe, next to the Red-necked Grebe, is a Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps) . They both belong to the Podicipedidae Family. Now that is a bird we see often here in Florida.

Pied-Billed Grebe at Lake Hollingsworth, Lakeland, FL by Dan

Pied-Billed Grebe at Lake Hollingsworth, Lakeland, FL by Dan

“The Pied-billed Grebes (Podilymbus podiceps) is a species of the grebe family of water birds. Since the Atitlán grebe (Podilymbus gigas) has become extinct, it is the sole extant member of the genus Podilymbus. The pied-billed grebe is primarily found in ponds throughout the Americas. Other names of this grebe include American dabchick, dabchick, Carolina grebe, devil-diver, dive-dapper, dipper, hell-diver, pied-billed dabchick, pied-bill, thick-billed grebe, and water witch.”

Pied-billed Grebes are small, stocky, and short-necked. They are mainly brown, with a darker crown and back. Their brown color serves as camouflage in the marshes they live in. They do not have white under their wings when flying, like other grebes. Their undertail is white and they have a short, blunt chicken-like bill that is a light grey color, which in summer is encircled by a broad black band (hence the name). In the summer, its throat is black.”  Pied-billed grebe – Wikipedia [with editing]

A Cool Fact about this from Pied-billed Grebe – All About Birds

  • Pied-billed Grebe chicks typically leave the nest the first day after hatching and spend much of their first week riding around on a parent’s back. They usually spend most of their first 3 weeks on or near the nest platform.

Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps) chick ©WikiC

We will check out the other two birds in the display case next.

I trust you will enjoy meeting the various birds through this series. The links provided give much more information, and photos of these species.

“The works of the LORD are great, Studied by all who have pleasure in them.” (Psalms 111:2 NKJV)

Gaviidae – Loons – Family

Podicipedidae – Grebes – Family

 

Waterman Bird Collection – Part I

BJU Waterman Bird Collection 2018

In Huge Bugs and Critters, the Waterman Bird Collection, in the Science building, was introduced. This post will start introducing you to these wonderfully preserved specimens of birds that lived over a hundred years ago.

BJU Bird Collection 2018

At first, it bothered me about the use of birds in this manner, even though many museums have displays of birds. Yet, when you look back 100 plus years, they didn’t have the technology, nor the modern color cameras or slow motion videos to capture images of them.

How to study birds, a practical guide (1910) Black and White Photos ©WikiC

John Audubon did excellent drawings, with detailed colors. He studied live birds and specimens to discover their designs and colors.

“John James Audubon’s Birds of America is a portal into the natural world. Printed between 1827 and 1838, it contains 435 life-size watercolors of North American birds (Havell edition), all reproduced from hand-engraved plates, and is considered to be the archetype of wildlife illustration.” Birds of America

When the Lord first created the birds, there were no specimens until sin entered. How must those first birds have appeared? Photos, movies, and even specimens would have given us quite a sight. Today, we have fossils, but they do not show the beautiful feathers and features that those original avian wonders must have been adorned with.

“So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” So the evening and the morning were the fifth day.” (Genesis 1:21-23 NKJV)

Common Eider, Bufflehead, and Canada Goose

The birds in the right hand side of the display above is where we will begin. On the top shelf is an Eider, a Bufflehead and a Goose. It is nice to see them together to get a size perspective. All of these three birds are in the Anatidae Family.

Common Eider (Somateria mollissima) BJU Bird Collection 2018

The Common Eider (pronounced /ˈaɪ.dər/) (Somateria mollissima) is a large (50–71 cm (20–28 in) in body length) sea-duck that is distributed over the northern coasts of Europe, North America and eastern Siberia. It breeds in Arctic and some northern temperate regions, but winters somewhat farther south in temperate zones, when it can form large flocks on coastal waters. It can fly at speeds up to 113 km/h (70 mph) Part of the Anatidae Family. Common Eider – Wikipedia and a Cool Fact from  All About Birds

  • The oldest recorded Common Eider was a male, and at least 22 years, 7 months old, when he was found in eastern Canada.

Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola) BJU Bird Collection 2018

The Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola) is a small sea duck of the genus Bucephala, the goldeneyes. This species was first described by Linnaeus in his Systema naturae in 1758 as Anas albeola.

The genus name is derived from Ancient Greek boukephalos, “bullheaded”, from bous, “bull ” and kephale, “head“, a reference to the oddly bulbous head shape of the species. The species name albeola is from Latin albus, “white”. The English name is a combination of buffalo and head, again referring to the head shape. This is most noticeable when the male puffs out the feathers on the head, thus greatly increasing the apparent size of the head. Bufflehead – Wikipedia, and a Cool Fact from Bufflehead – All About Birds

  • The Bufflehead nests almost exclusively in holes excavated by Northern Flickers and, on occasion, by Pileated Woodpeckers.

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) BJU Bird Collection 2018

The photo shows how much larger the Goose is than the Bufflehead.

The Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) is a large wild goose species with a black head and neck, white cheeks, white under its chin, and a brown body. Native to arctic and temperate regions of North America, its migration occasionally reaches northern Europe. It has been introduced to the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Argentina, Chile, and the Falkland Islands. Like most geese, the Canada goose is primarily herbivorous and normally migratory; it tends to be found on or close to fresh water. Canada Goose Canada Goose – Wikipedia and a Cool Fact from Canada Goose – All About Birds

  • The oldest known wild Canada Goose was a female, and at least 33 years, 3 months old when she was shot in Ontario in 2001. She had been banded in Ohio in 1969.

I trust you will enjoy meeting the various birds through this series. The links provided give much more information, and photos of these species.

“The works of the LORD are great, Studied by all who have pleasure in them.” (Psalms 111:2 NKJV)

 

Huge Bugs and Critters

BJU Homecoming

Dan and I rode up to Greenville, South Carolina to attend the 2018 BJU Homecoming. There were two main events that we attended. When we parked quite a way from the place we were to be, I sort of grumbled because of the long walk with my walker [The campus is on hills]. Yet, the Lord always seems to turn our upside down grumps into upright delights.

BJU Science Building

We parked down by the Science building, where Dan had taught years ago. I decided to take some photos. Thankfully, the building was open, and so began my delight. Inside we found a display of BIRDS! A lot of birds, which were from a collection of specimens that was completed before 1910. It was donated by Mr. Charles E. Waterman.

Waterman Bird Collection BJU 2018 Plaque

There were display cases filled with a Bird specimen collection that had been donated by Mr. Charles E Waterman. The collection is well over 100 years old. The birds have been well preserved, considering the age of ithe collection. My camera received a nice workout. [So did my back]

BJU BUg Collection 2018

Here are some of the Bug and Squirrel displays. Photos of the display case is to give you an idea of how big those bugs really were. Sure wouldn’t want any of them on me.

BJU BUg Collection 2018

The Harlequin Beetle (Acrocinus longimanus) tropical longhorned beetle native to the Americas, especially from southern Mexico to Brazil in South America. The harlequin beetle feeds on sap and is given this name because of its elaborate pattern of black, red and greenish yellow markings on the wing covers of both sexes. The species name longimanus is a Latin word that refers to the extremely long forelegs (manus) of the males, which are usually longer than the beetle’s entire body. As an adult, the species is very large, with a body that can measure nearly 76 mm (3 inches) in length.

Harlequin Beetle – Wikipedia

BJU BUg Collection 2018

Here are some photos of other Walking Sticks to Checkout! CLICK HERE

Other Stick Insects

BJU Squirrel Collection 2018

The squirrels look as if they were practicing for a football game. :)

God’s Creative Hand is definitely seen in all of these created critters.

“Because that which may be known of God is manifest in them; for God hath shewed it unto them. For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse: Because that, when they knew God, they glorified him not as God, neither were thankful; but became vain in their imaginations, and their foolish heart was darkened. Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools,” (Romans 1:19-22 KJV)

BJU Bird Collection Display Cases 2018

BJU Bird Collection Display Cases 2018

BJU Bird Collection Display Cases 2018

The Gospel Message

Where Am I Found? – Abdim’s Stork

Abdim’s Stork (Ciconia abdimii) Jax Zoo

“And I set my heart to seek and search out by wisdom concerning all that is done under heaven;” (Ecclesiastes 1:13a NKJV)

In the article – Where Am I Found – Tawny Frogmouth, you were to find out about the Tawny Frogmouth. Did you find out that they live in ?????. If not, go to that post and find out about this amazing Avian Wonder from the Creator.

The next amazing Avian Wonder from the Creator was the Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus). I found these at the zoo. Did you answer those questions?

At the Jacksonville Zoo, October 8th, we watched a rain soaked Abdim’s Stork (Ciconia abdimii), also known as a White-bellied Stork. He, along with his zoo friends, had endured a rainstorm before we arrived. He was also rained on, along with us, later. Not one of my favorite zoo visits, but we always enjoy seeing God’s Avian Creations, whether they are wet or dry.

Abdim’s Stork (Ciconia abdimii) Jax Zoo 10-8-2018

If you wanted to watch an Abdim’s Stork, where would you go? Yes, you can find them at the Jacksonville Zoo in Melbourne, Florida. But those storks are captive.

Where are Wrinkled Hornbills found in the wild? Clue: you would need to travel to an area that gets lots of rain.

Abdim’s Stork (Ciconia abdimii) Jax Zoo

“The Abdim’s stork (Ciconia abdimii), also known as white-bellied stork, is a black stork with grey legs, ??? knees and feet, grey bill and white underparts. It has red facial skin in front of the eye and blue skin near the bill in breeding season. It is the smallest species of stork, at 73 cm (29 in) and a weight of just over 1 kg (2.2 lbs). The female lays two to three eggs and is slightly smaller than the male.

The Abdim’s stork is found in open habitats throughout ????. Its diet consists mainly of ???, ??? and other large insects, although the birds will also eat small ???????. The Abdim’s stork has escaped or been deliberately released in to Florida, USA, but there is no evidence that the population is breeding and may only persist due to continuing releases or escapes.” Abdin’s Stork – Wikipedia

So where is ?????? Your challenge is to find out by searching.

“With all my wisdom I tried to understand everything that happens here on earth. And God has made this so hard for us humans to do.” (Ecclesiastes 1:13 CEV)

I still think this verse is telling us that, God the Creator, just wants us to make an effort. Yes, it takes a little effort, but when you find the answers, your understanding has just been increased.

Also can you answer these questions?

  1. Where am I from?
  2. What color are there knees?
  3. What size am I in comparison to other storks?
  4. What are the Fun Facts in the Sea World Article?
  5. What are the nesting habits of this stork? Abdin’s or White-bellied Stork – Beauty of Birds

Search these articles:

Abdin’s Stork at Jacksonville Zoo

Abdin’s Stork – Sea World Article

Abdin’s or White-bellied Stork – Beauty of Birds

Arkive – Hornbill

Abdin’s Stork – Wikipedia

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ABC’s of the Gospel

Creation Museum’s Mastodon

Mastodon Cast Fossil Creation Museum 2018 by Dan

“Then God said, “Let the earth bring forth the living creature according to its kind: cattle and creeping thing and beast of the earth, each according to its kind”; and it was so. And God made the beast of the earth according to its kind, cattle according to its kind, and everything that creeps on the earth according to its kind. And God saw that it was good.” (Genesis 1:24-25 NKJV)
On the last visit to the Creation Museum last month, we encountered the HUGE skeleton of a Mastodon. It is known as the Burning Tree Mastodon. This fossil is actually a casting of the original fossil that was found under a golf course in Ohio. Looks and size are the same.

Mastodon – Creation Museum 2018 by Lee

We took several photos of the Mastodon to help get a perspective as to how large is really is. I would not liked to have come upon one back when they were alive on earth.

Mastodon Head and Neck – Creation Museum 2018 by Lee

Mastodon Head – Creation Museum 2018 by Lee

Here are a couple of articles, from Answers in Genesis and Institute For Creation Research, that give a more information about the Mastodon.  

Where Am I Found? – Crested Caracara

Crested Caracara – Brevard Zoo 9-22-2018 by Lee

“And I set my heart to seek and search out by wisdom concerning all that is done under heaven;” (Ecclesiastes 1:13a NKJV)

In the article – Where Am I Found – Tawny Frogmouth, you were to find out about the Tawny Frogmouth. Did you find out that they live in ?????. The next article, Where Am I Found – Wrinkled Hornbill, did you also answer those questions?

Where are Caracaras found in the wild? Clue: I wouldn’t have to travel very far at all.

Crested Caracara Brevard Zoo 9-22-2018 by Lee

This Crested Caracara has an injured wing and stays at the Brevard Zoo, yet on the way to the zoo, we find them along the way sitting on power lines. Florida is one of the two states in the United States that has Caracaras in the wild. What is the other state? What other places do Crested Caracaras live?

Your challenge is to find out by searching.

“With all my wisdom I tried to understand everything that happens here on earth. And God has made this so hard for us humans to do.” (Ecclesiastes 1:13 CEV)

I think this verse is telling us that, God the Creator, just wants us to make an effort. Yes, it takes a little effort, but when you find the answers, your understanding has just been increased.

Here is a video from the Brevard Zoo:

Also can you answer these questions?

  1. Where am I from? Hint: Click here
  2. Am I active in the daytime or the nighttime?
  3. Are they birds of prey?
  4. What size am I?
  5. Where are their nest found?
  6. Who feeds the baby birds?

Search these articles:

Caracara – Brevard Zoo

Crested CaracaraAll About Birds

Crested Caracara – Audubon [They add one more state]

Crested Caracara – HBW Alive

Caracara – Wikipedia

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The Salvation Story

 

Where Am I Found? – Wrinkled Hornbill

Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus) by Lee at Brevard Zoo

Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus) by Lee at Brevard Zoo

“And I set my heart to seek and search out by wisdom concerning all that is done under heaven;” (Ecclesiastes 1:13a NKJV)

In the article – Where Am I Found – Tawny Frogmouth, you were to find out about the Tawny Frogmouth. Did you find out that they live in ?????. If not, go to that post and find out about this amazing Avian Wonder from the Creator.

Today’s amazing Avian Wonder from the Creator is the Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus). I found these at the zoo.

If you wanted to watch a Wrinkled Hornbill, where would you go? Yes, you can find them at the Brevard Zoo in Melbourne, Florida. But those Hornbills are captive.

Wrinkled Hornbill Female – Brevard Zoo by Lee

Where are Wrinkled Hornbills found in the wild? Clue: you would need to travel to an area that gets lots of rain.

“The male Sunda Wrinkled hornbill [another name for this bird] has a deep yellow bill with a ??? base, and a wrinkled ??? or ???? casque. The male’s eyes are surrounded by a rim of light ???? skin, while the sides of the head, upper breast and tail are ????, and the neck is bright ????.” What are those colors? [From Arkive – Hornbill]

So where is ?????? Your challenge is to find out by searching.

“With all my wisdom I tried to understand everything that happens here on earth. And God has made this so hard for us humans to do.” (Ecclesiastes 1:13 CEV)

I think this verse is telling us that, God the Creator, just wants us to make an effort. Yes, it takes a little effort, but when you find the answers, your understanding has just been increased.

Also can you answer these questions?

  1. Where am I from?
  2. Am I active in the daytime or the nighttime?
  3. What are the different colors on the male? HBW Alive
  4. What size am I?
  5. Where are their nest found?
  6. Are these birds monogamous? What does that term mean?

Search these articles:

Wrinkled Hornbill – Brevard Zoo

HBW Alive

Arkive – Hornbill

Wrinkled Hornbill – Wikipedia

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Wordless Woodpecker

Where Am I Found? – Tawny Frogmouth

Tawny Frogmouth at Brevard Zoo 4-3-18 by Lee

“And I set my heart to seek and search out by wisdom concerning all that is done under heaven;” (Ecclesiastes 1:13a NKJV)

If you wanted to watch a Tawny Frogmouth, where would you go? Yes, you can find two of them at the Brevard Zoo in Melbourne, Florida. But those Tawnys are captive.

Where are Tawny Frogmouths found in the wild? Clue: you would need to travel “down under.”

Tawny Frogmouth at Brevard Zoo 4-3-18 by Lee

One way you can find out is to ask “Google.” The Tawny Frogmouth (Podargus strigoides) is a species of frogmouth native to and found throughout the ????? and  ?????. Tawny frogmouths are big-headed, stocky birds often mistaken for owls due to their nocturnal habits and similar colouring. The tawny frogmouth is sometimes incorrectly referred to as “mopoke”, a common name for the southern boobook, whose call is often confused with the tawny frogmouth’s.

So where is ????? and ????? ? Your challenge is to find out by searching.

“With all my wisdom I tried to understand everything that happens here on earth. And God has made this so hard for us humans to do.” (Ecclesiastes 1:13 CEV)

I think this verse is telling us that, God the Creator, just wants us to make an effort. Yes, it takes a little effort, but when you find the answers, your understanding has just been increased.

Also can you answer these questions?

  1. Where am I from?
  2. Am I active in the daytime or the nighttime?
  3. What is the term for being able to not be seen?
  4. What do I like to eat?
  5. What size am I?

Search these articles:

Birds – Tawny Frogmouth

Tawny Frogmouth – Wikipedia

Deadly Stare – ????? Geographic

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The Wise Owl

Are You A Birdwatcher Or A Bug Watcher?

Family Circus Bug And Birdwatching ©ArcMax

When you go birdwatching, do you get side-tracked by other critters? It is easy to do. Since the Creator, the Lord Jesus Christ created all of them, they are all amazing and enjoyable to examine up close.

So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” (Genesis 1:21-22 NKJV)

Ladybug ©WikiC

Or maybe he was watching one of these:

Brevard Zoo Butterflies 4-3-2018 by Lee

Or could this be what he was looking at through his magnifying glass?

Caterpillar of the Old World Swallowtail – Size 42mm ©WikiC

“Then God said, ‘Let the earth bring forth the living creature according to its kind: cattle and creeping thing and beast of the earth, each according to its kind’; and it was so. And God made the beast of the earth according to its kind, cattle according to its kind, and everything that creeps on the earth according to its kind. And God saw that it was good.” (Genesis 1:24-25 NKJV)

Red-billed Oxpecker on equid “neighbor” (zebra), inspecting ear for bugs ©ibc.lynxeds

If you were to watch Woodstock, he would definitely entertain you.

Woodstock playing Elevator ©Arcamax

Then again, maybe Woodstock is trying to copy the behavior of the Widowbirds:

Trust you enjoy your day. A little humor helps our days be brighter.

ABC’s of the Gospel

Not The Stuff Of Legends! – Leviathan

Leviathan – Not The Stuff Of Legends Creation Museum 2018 by Lee

In the post, Behemoth – Not The Stuff Of Legends! the introductory signs were shown for Behemoth. Now, here is the information about Leviathan that is also mentioned in the Bible. Job 41.
(1) “Can you draw out Leviathan with a hook, Or snare his tongue with a line which you lower? (2) Can you put a reed through his nose, Or pierce his jaw with a hook? (9) Indeed, any hope of overcoming him is false; Shall one not be overwhelmed at the sight of him?” (Job 41:1,2,9) NKJV
(19) “Out of his mouth go burning lights; Sparks of fire shoot out. (20) Smoke goes out of his nostrils, As from a boiling pot and burning rushes. (20) Smoke goes out of his nostrils, As from a boiling pot and burning rushes. (21) His breath kindles coals, And a flame goes out of his mouth. (22) Strength dwells in his neck, And sorrow dances before him. (23) The folds of his flesh are joined together; They are firm on him and cannot be moved. (24) His heart is as hard as stone, Even as hard as the lower millstone. (25) When he raises himself up, the mighty are afraid; Because of his crashings they are beside themselves. (26) Though the sword reaches him, it cannot avail; Nor does spear, dart, or javelin. (27) He regards iron as straw, And bronze as rotten wood. (28) The arrow cannot make him flee; Slingstones become like stubble to him.” (Job 41:19-28 NKJV)
These verses definitely describe some sort of large and strong critter in the sea or a body of water. Sounds like something you wouldn’t want to “tangle” with. Webster’s Definition of Leviathan (1828 ver.) LEVI’ATHAN, n. [Heb.] 1. An aquatic animal, described in Job 41, and mentioned in other passages of Scripture. In Isaiah, it is called the crooked serpent. It is not agreed what animal is intended by the writers, whether the crocodile, the whale, or a species of serpent. 2. The whale, or a great whale. I forgot to put this is the first article: Webster’s Definition of Behemoth (1828 ver.) BE’HEMOTH, n.]Heb. a beast or brute; from an Arabic vert, which signifies, to shut, to lie hid, to be dumb. In Eth.dumb.] Authors are divided in opinion as to the animal intended in scripture by this anme; some supposing it to be an ox, others, an elephant; and Bochart labors to prove it the hippopotamus, or river horse. The latter opinion is most probably. [See Hippopotamus.] The original word in Arabic signifies a brute of beast in general, especially a quadruped. Both of these definitions have left the authors guessing, yet God, the Creator knows exactly what they were.
R A Torrey’s – Leviathan Nave’s – Leviathan Wordless Birds